Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2887273 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 19, 1959
Filing dateMar 29, 1955
Priority dateMar 29, 1955
Publication numberUS 2887273 A, US 2887273A, US-A-2887273, US2887273 A, US2887273A
InventorsJohn J Anderson, William C Harris, Thomas S Harrison
Original AssigneeJohnson & Son Inc S C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spray dispensing assembly
US 2887273 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1959 J. JfANDERsoN ETAL 2,887,273

SPRAY DISPENSING ASSEMBLY Filgd March 29, 1955 W A mm? a 2,887,273 SPRAY DISPENSING ASSEMBLY John J. Anderson, William C. Harris, and Thomas S. Harrison, Racine, Wis assignors to S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc, Racine, Wis.

Application March 29, 1955, Serial No. 497,674

4 Claims. (Cl. 239.437

This invention relates to aerosol containers, and it is concerned more particularly with an improved spray dispensing assembly for aerosol containers which will increasethe versatility of the container by adapting the container to deliver a sprayin a manner best suited for the operating conditions encountered.

Aerosol containers are currently used for dispensing insecticides, deodorants, paints, and other materials. These containers generally have a cylindrical body portion and have at one of their ends a release valve mechanism which is adapted to be moved to an open positionby the user permitting the material in the container to be discharged from the container in the form of a spray. The release valve mechanism includes a valve stem which projects outwardly from the body portion of the container and which has provided in an end portion thereof a discharge vent through which the spray is ejected. The discharge vent is connected by means of a suitable passage in the valve stem with a port at the base of the valve stem. The valve mechanism is spring biased to a closed position and is opened by depressing the valve stem inwardly toward the body portion of the container, or by casting the valve stem to one side, against the pressure of the spring biasing mechanism.

When the valve stem is actuated in this manner, the port at the base of the valve stem is opened to the interior of the container, and discharge of the material in the container takes place through the discharge vent. The spring biasing mechanism serves to return the valve stem to a closed position when the pressure on the valve stem is released. y

Aerosol containers of this kind have been widely accepted, however, it has been Ifound that in certain instances better results could be achieved if a mechanism were provided for varying the type of spray discharge from the container. For instance, when the aerosol con tainer is used with insecticides, often it is desirable that the spray pattern, spray particle size, and/or the rate of discharge be varied depending upon the conditions under which the insecticide is used. In the case of insecticides, the optimum type of spray discharge might vary depending on the movement of the air, the type of insect to be. exterminated, and the sensitivity of the surrounding plant and animal life. Similarly; when the container is used with paints, the optimum type of spray discharge would vary according to the particular painting conditions encountered.

It has also been found that considerable difliculty has been encountered in handling; aerosol containers of the type described. Since the release valve includes a valve stem which protrudes a considerable distance above the body portion of the container, and since this valve is 2,887,273 Patented May 19, 1959 i opened by depressing this valve stem, if these containers are to find maximum acceptance, means should be provided to facilitate stacking the containers and to guard against accidental discharge from the container brought about by inadvertently depressing the valve stem and consequent actuation of the release valve.

Generally, it is an object of this invention to provide an assembly for aerosol containers which will take care of the hereinbefore outlined requirements in a fully practical and satisfactory manner.

More specifically, it is an object of this invention to provide an assembly for aerosol containers which will permit the container to have a number of different types of selectively obtained spray discharge.

Still another object of this invention is to provide an assembly for aerosol containers which will facilitate the stacking and shipping of the containers; and to provide an assembly which will guardv against inadvertent discharge from the release vent of the container when the assembly is incorporated with an aerosol container.

The foregoing and other objects and inventions are attained by the. present invention, various novel features,

of which will become apparent as the following specification is read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view. of a valve member used in. the assembly;

Fig. 2 is a perspective. view of another valve member, used in the assembly; i

Fig. 3 is another perspective view, partly in section, of the valve member shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a sectional view of the valve members in 1 Figs. 1 and 2 taken along the lines 44 and 4-4 of Figs. 1 and 2, respectively, showing the members assembled with an aerosol container, and with the valve stem 1 of the container shown partly in section;

Fig. 5 is a sectional view of a valve member and a release valve mechanism showing a modified form of the herein. disclosed. invention. 1

Referring to Fig. 4, a specific embodiment, of this invention is shown in conjunction with. a conventional aerosol container generally indicated at 10. The container 10 may be constructed of a cylindrical body por- 7 tion 11 which has its top end covered and tightly sealed by a convex lid member llwhose peripheral edge is interfolded with the circumferential edge of body portion 11 to form an annular ridge 13. The bottom end of body portion 11 is similarly sealed by a conventional concave bottom member (not shown) forming an annular ridge at the base of the container having the same dimensions as ridge 13. The center of lid member 12 is provided with a valve cup 14 which is crimped in a circular opening in the center of lid member 12 and which has its peripheral edge rolled over an annular bead 16 presented by lid member 12, forming a shoulder 17. Projecting outwardly from the center of valve cup 14 is a tubular valve stem 18. Valve stem 18 is provided at an outer endrportion with a discharge vent 19, which isconnected by a passage; 21 with a valve mechanism located within the container under valve cup 14.. This valve mechal nism may be. of any conventional design such as the one illustrated in Fig. 5 generally indicated at 22. In the I structure shown in Fig. 5., the center of valve cup 14 is 3 pression coil spring 26 is positioned within the space bounded by insert 23 and has its upper end bearing against a washer 27 seated on the lower side of a base portion 28 of the valve stem. Under the pressure of spring 26, base portion 28 is thrust in fluid tight relation against a pair of gasket members 29 seated on the upper surface of base portion 28. A small orifice 31 connects passage 21 in the valve stem with an annular trough 32 formed in the upper surface of the base portion. When the valve stem is depressed orcanted to one side against the bias of spring 26, the pressure within the aerosol container forces material from the bottom of the container through a dip tube connected to the dip tube receiver portion into the space bounded by the insert 23. Thence the material flows around the base portion of the valve stem to annular trough 32, orifice 31 and passage 21. The valve stem is held against rotation relative to the container by the friction created by coil spring 26 thrusting base portion 28 against gasket members 29.

In the embodiment shown in Figs. 1, 2, 3, and 4, the spray assembly consists in general of an inner valve member 33 adapted to be secured to the top end of an aerosol container, and a relatively rotatable outer valve member 34. Inner valve member 33 includes a ring portion 36, a sleeve or coupling portion 37, and a valve spindle 38. Sleeve portion 37 and valve spindle 38 are supported centrally within ring portion 36 by a flexible wall portion 39.

As shown in Fig. 4, sleeve portion 37 is adapted to fit snugly over and be received by valve stem 18 when inner valve member 33 is assembled with the aerosol container. A series of lugs 40 projecting radially inward from the inner surface of ring portion 36, together with an annular groove 41, are provided to seat the inner valve member on shoulder 17 of the aerosol container when the inner valve member is in this assembled posi- As can best be seen in Fig. l, a discharge passage 52 is provided in valve cap 48 which is movable by rotating the valve cap into register with either control passage 43 or control passage 44. When passage 52 is in registry with control passage 43, control passage 44 will be closed by the inner wall surface of valve cap- 48. Any material ejected from vent 19 is collected in chamber 46 and exhausted through the single control passage 43. When the valve cap is rotated so that passage 52 is in registry with control passage 44, fluid exhaust will take place through passage 44. Valve cap 48 is rotatable to a position intermediate these two positions where both passages are closed by the inner wall surface of valve cap 48, and in this position, no fluid discharge will take place through valve spindle 38.

As can be seen in Fig. 4, control passages 43 and 44 are each provided with a constriction which serves to control the flow of material through each passage. Each constriction is designed to give a certain type of spray discharge, and in the embodiment shown, the discharge through passage 43 will be somewhat less than the discharge through passage 44, since the constriction in passage 43 is greater than the constriction in passage 44. These passages could be designed to control the type of discharge from the container in a variety of other ways, as for instance, to control the pattern of the spray and/ or the particle size of the spray ejected'from the aerosol container.

H inside diameter of ridge 13. This facilitates stacking a tion. To nonrotatably secure inner valve member 33 in a seated position on shoulder 17, a series of flange segments 42' extending radially inward from the bottom end of ring portion 36 have been provided so as to grip the under side of shoulder 17 when inner valve member 33 is seated thereon. Flange segments 42 are flexibly secured to ring portion 36, and will give slightly as the inner valve member 33 is snapped into position on shoulder 17. When it is desired to actuate the release valve by depressing the valve stem 18, flexible wall 39 permits sleeve portion 37 and valve spindle 38 to be depressed together with valve stem 18, and independently of ring portion 36 and flange segments 42 which fasten the inner valve member to the aerosol container.

' Referring again to Fig. 4, valve spindle 38 is integrally formed with sleeve portion 37 and has provided at its upper end a pair of fluid control passages 43 and 44 spaced on opposite sides of valve spindle 38. Passages 43 and 44 communicate at their inner ends with a col lection chamber 46 formed at the center of the valve spindle. When the inner valve member 33 is assembled with an aerosol container, chamber 46 will communicate with discharge vent 19 in valve stem 18 so that material discharged from vent 19 will collect in chamber 46.

Outer valve member 34 includes an annular support collar 47 and a centrally disposed valve cap 48 connected to support collar 47 by means of a flexible arm 49. The lower edge of support collar 47 has a groove 51 formed therein which is adapted to rest on ridge 13 when the parts are assembled with a container as shown in Fig. 4. In this condition of the parts, valve cap 48 is mounted about valve spindle 38, and support collar 47 and valve cap 48 are free to rotate with respect to inner valve member 33 and the aerosol container 10. Flexible arm 49 permits valve cap 48 to be depressed inwardly independently of support collar 47 when it is desired to actuate the release valve by depressing valve stem 18.

number of the containers since the ridge at the base of each container, which is the same size as ridge 13 as previously explained, will fit about the outer edge of support shoulder 53. Also, since the bottom member of each container is concave, the top surface of the outer valve member 34 will clear the bottom surface of each container when the containers are stacked.

Extending downwardly from the inner edge of support shoulder 53 is a flexible, serrated wall 54. With the 'parts assembled as in Fig. 4, serrated wall 54 substantially surrounds the outer surface of ring portion 36 of the inner valve member save for a portion under flexible arm 49 which has been omitted to permit flexure of arm 49. A series of radially inwardly projecting ridge segments 56 are provided at the lower edge of serrated wall 54. When the valve members are assembled as in Fig. 4, ridge segments 56 will snap into an annular groove 57 formed in the outer surface of ring portion 36, fixing outer valve member 34 against axial displacement away from inner valve member 33.

As an aid to positioning the two valve members in different adjusted positions, i.e., positions where either control passage 43 or control passage 44 is in registry with discharge passage 52, or where both passages are closed by the inner wall surface of valve cap 48, cooperating protruding means are provided between the inner and outer valve members. Referring to Figs. 2 and 3, projecting downwardly from support shoulder 53 of the outer valve member is a finger portion 58. In each of the adjusted positions of the inner and outer valve members, finger portion 58 will snap between a corresponding pair of lugs 59 projecting radially outwardly from the outer surface of ring portion 36. An arrow together with suitable markings are provided on the visible portions of the inner and outer valve members to assist the user in selecting the type of spray desired.

Fig. 5 shows a modified form of the herein described invention. In the embodiment shown in Fig. 5, a valve stem 61 has a discharge vent 62 which extends radially outwardly to one side of the valve stem, and the top of the valve stem is sealed shut. Rotatably mounted about valve stem 61 is an outer valve member 63. Two fluid control passages 64 and 66 are provided in valve member 63 on opposite sides of the valve member. These control passages are designed to control the type of discharge from container 11 in the same manner as passages 43 and 44 in inner valve member 33. Outer valve member 63 may be adjusted so that either control passage 64 or control passage 66 is in registry with discharge vent 62, or to an intermediate positionwhere both passages are closed by the inner wall surface of valve member 63.

From the foregoing, it is apparent that a very simple but practical means has been provided which will increase the utility of aerosol containers and which will facilitate the handling of these containers. When valve members 33 and 34 are mounted on a container as described hereinbefore, the fluid discharge mechanism, comprising the inner valve member 33 and valve stem 18, together with the associated release valve mechanism, presents a nozzle member, comprising a valve spindle 38, having a plurality of fluid control passages adapted to be opened to the interior of the aerosol container when the nozzle member is depressed. A selector member, comprising the outer valve member 34, may be rotated so that discharge passage 52 is in registry selectively with either control passage 43 or control passage 44 in the nozzle member of the fluid discharge mechanism, or so that both passages are closed. Another mode of applying the principle of the invention is illustrated in the modified form of this invention shown in Fig. 5. In this instance, the nozzle member comprising valve stem 61, is provided with a single discharge passage, and the selector member, comprising outer valve member 63, has a plurality of control passages which are movable selectively into registry with the discharge passage. In both forms of the invention when the release valve mechanism is actuated by depressing the valve nozzle, the manner in which the material is ejected from the container will depend upon the adjusted position of the selector member. When the selector member is positioned so that both control passages are closed, accidental discharge is effectively guarded against since no material discharge can take place through the valve nozzle member.

While we have described only two particular embodiments of this invention, it should be understood that we do not wish to be restricted thereto, and that we intend to cover all modifications of the invention which would be apparent to one skilled in the art and which come within the scope of the appended claims.

We claim:

1. In a combination with a container for confining fluids under pressure, said container having a cylindrical body portion and two end portions, a depressably actuable valve stem axially projecting from and attached to one end of said body portion, said valve stem having a disr charge vent therein for releasing said fluids from said container; a variable spray assembly comprising an inner valve member and a rotatable outer valve member, said inner valve member including a coupling sleeve portion received by said valve stem in a fluid tight relationship, a valve spindle having internal surface portions defining with said valve stem an expansion chamber communicating with said discharge vent, skirt fastening means securing said inner valve member to said one end of said body portion, and flexible webbing extending from said skirt fastening means to said sleeve portion and valve spindle permitting said sleeve and spindle to be depressed with said valve stem independently of said skirt fastening means; said outer valve member having a valve cap rotatably mounted on said valve spindle; exhaust conduit means for selectively establishing a fluid exhaust connection with said expansion chamber and closing the same, said exhaust conduit means including a plurality of fluid control passages, each having a distinctive configuration, formed in one of said valve members and a discharge passage formed in the other of said valve members, said discharge passage being selectively registrable with each of said fluid control passages on rotation of said outer valve member, whereby fluid emitted from said container may egress from said expansion chamber, upon depression of said valve stem and spindle.

2. In combination with a container for confining fluids under pressure, said container having a cylindrical body portion and two end portions, a depressably actuable valve stem axially projecting from and attached to one end of said body portion, said valve stem having a discharge vent therein for releasing said fluids from said container; a variable spray assembly comprising a pair of interfitted relatively rotatable inner and outer valve members, one of said valve members having a coupling portion received by said valve stem in a fluid tight relationship; skirt fastening means securing said inner valve member to said one end of said body portion, said inner and outer valve members having internal surface portions defining exhaust conduit means for selectively closing said discharge vent or establishing a fluid exhaust connection with said discharge vent, said exhaust conduit means including a closure wall and a plurality of fluid control passages each of a different configuration formed in one of said valve members and a discharge passage formed in the other of said valve members, said discharge passage being selectively registrable with said closure wall and with each of said fluid control passages on relative rotation of said inner and outer valve members to selectively close said discharge vent or establish said fluid exhaust connection through one of said fluid control passages.

3. In combination with a container for confining fluids under pressure, said container having a cylindrical body portion and two end portions, a depressably actuable valve stem axially projecting from and attached to one end of said body portion, and valve stem having a discharge vent therein for releasing said fluids from said container; a variable spray assembly comprising an inner valve member having a coupling portion received by said valve stem in a fluid tight relationship; skirt fastening means securing said inner valve member to said one end of said body portion, an outer valve member mounted on said inner valve member for relative rotation thereto, said inner and outer valve members having internal surface portions tiefining exhaust conduit means for selectively closing said discharge vent or establishing a fluid exhaust connection with said discharge vent, said exhaust conduit means including a closure wall and a plurality of fluid control passages each of different configuration formed in one of said valve members and a discharge passage formed in the other of said valve members; said discharge passage being movable selectively into registering position with said closure Wall and with each of said fluid control passages by relative rotation of said valve members to selectively close said discharge vent or establish said fluid exhaust connection, said inner and outer valve members including protruding means operatively interposed between said members for positioning said members in said registering positions.

4. In combination with a container for confining fluids under pressure, said container having a cylindrical body portion and two end portions, a depressably actuable valve stem axially projecting from and attached to one end of said body portion, said valve stem having a discharge vent therein for releasing said fluids from said container; a variable spray assembly comprising a pair of interfitted relatively rotatable in er and. outer valve members, said inner valve member including a coupling portion received by said valve stem in a fluid tight relationship, fastening means securing said inner valve member to said one end of said body portion, and means flexibly connecting said coupling portion and fastening means permitting said coupling portion to be depressed with said valve stem independently of said fastening means, said inner and outer valve members having internal surface portions definin'g exhaust conduit means for selectively establishing a fluid exhaust connection with said discharge vent, said exhaust conduit means including a plurality of fluid control passages each of different con- I figuration formed in one of said valve members and a 5 discharge passage formed in the other of said valve members; said discharge passage being selectively registrable with each of said fluid control passages on relative rotation of said inner and outer valve members to selectively establish said fluid exhaust connection through one of 10 said fluid control passages.

ReferencesCited in the file of this patent V UNITED STATES PATENTS Schlosser Nov. 22, 1938 Svendsen Oct. 30, 1951 Tuttle Dec. 4, 1951 Green May 24, 1955 FOREIGN PATENTS Switzerland J an. 21, 1921 Australia Feb. 12, 1931

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2137786 *Apr 9, 1936Nov 22, 1938Lectrolite CorpSpray oiler
US2573624 *Jul 13, 1950Oct 30, 1951Robert W SvendsenCap for aerosol bomb
US2577245 *Nov 2, 1949Dec 4, 1951Tuttle WainwrightShielded operator assembly for valved nozzles
US2709111 *Nov 22, 1952May 24, 1955Aerosol Res CompanySpraying devices
AU69931A * Title not available
CH93531A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2996258 *Sep 11, 1958Aug 15, 1961Standard Container IncSpraying apparatus
US2997243 *Aug 27, 1958Aug 22, 1961George E KolbAerosol container
US3062411 *May 29, 1959Nov 6, 1962Colgate Pahnolive CompanyDispensing valve actuator
US3075709 *Mar 30, 1961Jan 29, 1963Newman Green IncSpray head and guide assembly for aerosols
US3083872 *Jan 2, 1959Apr 2, 1963Meshberg PhilipSelective dispensing nozzle
US3104034 *Oct 24, 1960Sep 17, 1963Vca IncCap construction for aerosol devices
US3107033 *Oct 27, 1960Oct 15, 1963Sanborn Phillip DAerosol cap and button
US3144175 *Nov 21, 1962Aug 11, 1964Valve Corp Of AmericaAerosol actuator cap construction
US3149757 *Oct 10, 1961Sep 22, 1964Gillette CoMeans locking valve actuating mechanism against accidental operation
US3174694 *Sep 29, 1961Mar 23, 1965Seiichi KitabayashiAerosol dispenser push button having a side slit
US3176888 *Jan 4, 1963Apr 6, 1965Precision Valve CorpValve operating buttons for aerosol dispensers
US3180536 *Apr 8, 1963Apr 27, 1965Meshberg PhilipSelective dispensing means
US3225966 *Aug 20, 1963Dec 28, 1965Valve Corp Of AmericaActuator cap construction for aerosol devices
US3246850 *May 20, 1964Apr 19, 1966Corn Products CoDual spray head
US3258208 *May 7, 1964Jun 28, 1966Seaquist Valve CoAerosol valve
US3260416 *Jul 19, 1962Jul 12, 1966Precision Valve CorpDispensing cap for an aerosol container
US3269614 *Jul 30, 1963Aug 30, 1966Henry Abplanalp RobertDispensing cap for an aerosol container
US3276641 *Oct 23, 1964Oct 4, 1966Valve Corp Of AmericaActuator for dispensing pump
US3313458 *Aug 9, 1965Apr 11, 1967Braun Arthur RToggle link actuator for axially reciprocable aerosol valve
US3342382 *Oct 22, 1965Sep 19, 1967Clayton Corp Of DelawarePressured dispenser spout having plurality of decorator orifices
US3347423 *Jul 7, 1966Oct 17, 1967Wallace & Tiernan IncContainer and its components for aerosol product
US3363968 *Apr 6, 1965Jan 16, 1968Roger K. WilliamsAerosol dispenser
US3433419 *Sep 13, 1965Mar 18, 1969Pittsburgh Railways CoAerosol valve having swirl chamber
US3608791 *Oct 15, 1968Sep 28, 1971Union Carbide CorpAerosol actuator assembly
US3703994 *Jul 6, 1971Nov 28, 1972Gillette CoAdjustable spray rate actuator
US3711030 *Jun 22, 1971Jan 16, 1973Imp Oil LtdMulti-pattern spraying apparatus
US3915345 *May 24, 1974Oct 28, 1975Feldman Jeffrey MAerosol can for dispensing materials in fixed volumetric ratio
US4277004 *Oct 15, 1979Jul 7, 1981Barlics John JCover and aerosol activator for aerosol spray can
US4418842 *Mar 31, 1981Dec 6, 1983Precision Valve CorporationChild resistant closure
US4690312 *May 15, 1986Sep 1, 1987S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Dual function cap
US4805839 *May 11, 1988Feb 21, 1989S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Tilt-spray aerosol actuator button and dies
US4863074 *Dec 7, 1987Sep 5, 1989Ams PackagingDistributor cap assembly for a pressurized container
US5018647 *Jul 3, 1990May 28, 1991Abplanalf Robert HDispensing cap for use with pressurized container
US5027982 *Mar 29, 1990Jul 2, 1991S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Aerosol actuator and overcap assembly
US5105989 *Sep 4, 1990Apr 21, 1992S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Modular non-aerosol dispensing overcap
US5385303 *Oct 12, 1993Jan 31, 1995The Procter & Gamble CompanyAdjustable aerosol spray package
US5649645 *Feb 15, 1995Jul 22, 1997S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.For use with a conventional aerosol can
US6302302 *Feb 11, 2000Oct 16, 2001L'orealLockable dispensing head and dispenser equipped therewith
US6742717 *Jul 29, 2002Jun 1, 2004S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Actuator cap for radially locating a can in a holding device
US6820821Nov 16, 2001Nov 23, 2004S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Automated cleansing sprayer
US7017785Jul 25, 2003Mar 28, 2006L'orealProduct dispensing head and packaging with variable flow
US7611032Jan 27, 2005Nov 3, 2009L'orealLockable dispensing head
US7775458Sep 24, 2004Aug 17, 2010S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Automated cleansing sprayer
US7854353 *Sep 22, 2005Dec 21, 2010Seaquest Perfect Dispensing GmbHDevice for dispensing, especially atomizing, a preferably cosmetic liquid
US7861894 *Aug 22, 2007Jan 4, 2011Seaquistperfect Dispensing L.L.C.Lockable dispenser
US8127968 *Apr 1, 2008Mar 6, 2012Aptar Group, Inc.Aerosol actuator
US8333304Feb 1, 2011Dec 18, 2012Haage Gregory ASelect-a-spray
US8418892 *Aug 17, 2006Apr 16, 2013Coster Tecnologie Speciali S.P.A.Lockable spray cap
US8800824Feb 29, 2012Aug 12, 2014Alfonso M. Gañan-CalvoSequential delivery valve apparatus and methods
US20120012675 *Feb 2, 2007Jan 19, 2012Coty S.A.S.Enclosure for a pressurized spray container
DE1425867B1 *Jul 30, 1964Aug 12, 1971Green Edward HowardVentilanordnung fuer Aerosol-Spruehdosen
DE10002088A1 *Jan 19, 2000Aug 2, 2001Seaquist Perfect DispensingVerriegelbare Betätigungsvorrichtung für eine Abgabevorrichtung eines Flüssigkeitsbehälters
DE10002088B4 *Jan 19, 2000Sep 29, 2005Seaquist Perfect Dispensing GmbhVerriegelbare Betätigungsvorrichtung für eine Abgabevorrichtung eines Flüssigkeitsbehälters
DE10042302A1 *Aug 29, 2000Apr 4, 2002Thomas GmbhAerosol can, e.g. for shoe polish, has spray head which rotates until lugs on it fit into slots in central ring, allowing it to be operated, mounting ring outside central ring carrying flexible radial strips which fit against can collar
DE10042302B4 *Aug 29, 2000Aug 18, 2005Thomas GmbhSprühdose
EP1384688A1Jul 1, 2003Jan 28, 2004L'orealDispensing head as well as storage and dispensing device for product with variable discharge rate
EP1793936A1 *Sep 22, 2005Jun 13, 2007Seaquist Perfect Dispensing GmbHDevice for dispensing, especially atomizing, a preferably cosmetic liquid
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/337, 222/402.17, 251/208, 222/402.11, 222/402.13, 239/446, 239/581.1, D09/448
International ClassificationB01F5/04, B65D83/14
Cooperative ClassificationB05B1/1645, B65D83/206, B01F5/0496, B65D83/44
European ClassificationB65D83/44, B05B1/16B3B, B65D83/20C2, B01F5/04C18