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Publication numberUS2887794 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 26, 1959
Filing dateFeb 6, 1956
Priority dateFeb 7, 1955
Publication numberUS 2887794 A, US 2887794A, US-A-2887794, US2887794 A, US2887794A
InventorsMasera Giovanni
Original AssigneeMasera Giovanni
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe made of thermo-plastic or thermosetting material or the like
US 2887794 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 26, 1959 2,887,794

G.MASERA SHOE MADE OF THERMO-PLASTIC OR THERMO-SETTING MATERIAL OR THE LIKE I Filed Feb. 6. 195a INVENTOR Y GIOVANNI MASERA- Y GMWAW ATTORNEY! United States Patent SHOE MADE OF THERMO-PLASTIC QR THERMU- SETTING MATERIAL OR THE LIKE Giovanni Masera, Piacenza, Italy Application February 6, 1956, Serial No. 563,756

Claims priority, application Italy February 7, 1955 2 Claims. (CI. 36-25) This invention relates to a shoe made at least in part from a thermo-setting or thermo-plastic material or the like.

An object of the present invention is to provide a novel shoe for men and women which is lighter, more resistant, and more durable than ordinary shoes.

The objects of the present invention may be realized through the provision of a shoe wherein the sole and the heel constitute a single member, so that the heel is integral with the sole, the member consisting of a thermo-plastic or thermo-setting material or the like, and having upon its bottom surface a central depression enclosed by ribs forming a channel and constituting the ground engaging portion of the shoe.

The invention will appear more clearly from the following description when taken in connection with the accompanying drawing, showing by way of example only a preferred embodiment of the inventive idea.

In the drawing:

Figure 1 is a central section through a shoe and illustrates the sole and the heel constituting the subject of the present invention.

Figure 2 is a bottom view of the article shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a top view of the article shown in Fig. 1.

Figure 4 is a section along the line IV-IV of Fig. 1.

The shoe shown in the drawing has a sole A and a heel B which is integral with the sole A, so that the sole and the heel constitute a single member made of a thermoplastic material.

The bottom surface of the sole A has a central depression 1. Border ribs 2 enclose the central depression 1 and converge substantially at the ball line to form two integral shank ribs 6, which extend through the shank portion of the sole. The ribs 2 form a continuous channel 3 located in the ball portion of the sole. A

i atented May 26, 1959 resilient member 6 may be inserted into the channel 3 so as to form the ground engaging portion of the shoe. This will make the use of the shoe more comfortable and will reduce wear upon the sole.

As shown in Fig. 2, the central depression 1 is provided with a central projection '7 and cross-ribs 3, located within the depression 1 and merging into the central projection 7. The cross-ribs 8 extend toward the parallel border ribs 2.

The heel B has a hollow interior 4 so as to make it lighter. The interior 4 of the heel B may be closed by a plate 5 which may be made of the same material as the member A, B. The described shoe has a greater resistance than ordinary shoes, and it is noiseless and more comfortable in use. The shoe can be made of any color or shape or of a transparent material or the like.

While the drawing illustrates a womens shoe, it is apparent that the same structure can be used for mens shoes and that changes may be made in the illustrated construction within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A shoe having a sole and a heel integral therewith, said sole and said heel consisting of a thermoplastic material, said sole having upon its bottom surface a central depression within the ball portion of the sole, continuous projecting parallel border ribs forming a channel therebetween and enclosing said central depression, said parallel border ribs converging substantially at the ball line to form two integral shank ribs extending through the shank portion of the sole, a ct ntral projection within said depression, and cross ribs within said depression merging into said central projection and extending toward said parallel border ribs.

2. A shoe in accordance with claim 1, having a resilient insert in said channel.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1118954 *May 11, 1914Dec 1, 1914Isidore ShapiroRubber sole.
US1486630 *Apr 2, 1923Mar 11, 1924Burnett George TBathhouse shoe
US1808063 *Jul 16, 1929Jun 2, 1931Converse Rubber CompanyFootwear
US2065856 *Feb 28, 1936Dec 29, 1936Leonard GroverSole and heel structure
US2267125 *Jan 31, 1940Dec 23, 1941Joseph K MolnarShoe
US2281390 *Oct 5, 1939Apr 28, 1942Isidore Simon CyComposition shoe heel
US2402227 *Nov 17, 1944Jun 18, 1946Orden E IhleMolded plastic shoe
DE319644C *Mar 16, 1919Mar 12, 1920Adolf HagenGelenksandale mit Fussbefestigungsstrippen
FR584489A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3012340 *Jan 14, 1960Dec 12, 1961Catherine B ReinhartShoe having interchangeable members
US4041620 *Aug 27, 1976Aug 16, 1977Shell Oil CompanyIntegrated shoe sole and heel
US4629583 *Jun 11, 1985Dec 16, 1986Jones And Vining, IncorporatedPhosphorescent polymer-containing compositions and articles made therefrom
US5005299 *Feb 12, 1990Apr 9, 1991Whatley Ian HShock absorbing outsole for footwear
US5224279 *Jun 17, 1991Jul 6, 1993James AgnewAthletic shoe sole design and construction
US5440826 *Mar 18, 1994Aug 15, 1995Whatley; Ian H.Shock absorbing outsole for footwear
WO1991011926A1 *Feb 11, 1991Aug 13, 1991Ian H WhatleyShock absorbing outsole for footwear
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/25.00R, 36/DIG.200
International ClassificationA43B23/22, A43B13/24
Cooperative ClassificationY10S36/02, A43B13/24, A43B1/0072, A43B23/22
European ClassificationA43B1/00T, A43B13/24, A43B23/22