Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2887824 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 26, 1959
Filing dateFeb 26, 1957
Priority dateFeb 26, 1957
Publication numberUS 2887824 A, US 2887824A, US-A-2887824, US2887824 A, US2887824A
InventorsWilliam Riva
Original AssigneeWilliam Riva
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Floral receptacle pane for windows and the like
US 2887824 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 26, 1959 RNA 2,887,824

FLORAL RECEPTACLE PANE FOR wtubows AND THE LIKE -Filed Feb. 26, 1957 llll FLORAL RECEPTACLEPANE FOR wnvnows AND THE LIKE q This invention relates to glazed structural members for buildings, and more particularly to an improved ornamental pane for glazing such members.

In conventional fenestruction panes of glass are glazed into appropriate frames such 'as window frames, door frames and the like. The panes are usually clear and transparent, but in some cases may be. tinted, colored, translucent, frosted, and. inrare cases evenopaque. In an eifort to attractively ornament window areas of homes, colored glassware and the like have been disposed inside such window areas, but this necessitates elaborate shelving or hangingarrangements to support the same.

The primary object of the present invention is to generally .improve the glazing of windows, doors and the like, with a view to ornamenting the same. A more particular object is to provide one or more receptacles or vase-like elements directly on or'forming 'a part of the panes. For convenience the product may be referred to as a receptacle-pane. These may be made of colored transparent or translucent material, or a clear material may be used but the receptacle later filled with colored liquid, thus making the color changeable at will. receptacle is preferably sealed to the pane entirely around its periphery in order to minimize danger of spillageand evaporation, but one or more small holes may be provided near the top to receive the stems of flowers or like additional decorative material.

To accomplish the foregoing general objects, and other more specific objects which will hereinafter appear, my invention resides in the receptacle and pane elements, and their relation one to another and to the glazed structural member receiving the same, as are hereinafter more particularly described in the following specification. The specification is accompanied by a drawing, in which:

Fig. 1 is a front elevation of a Window having a receptacle-pane at the center to ornament the same:

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary elevation of a part of the window localized at the receptacle-pane, with the flowers removed;

Fig. 3 is a transverse section taken approximately in the plane of the line 3-3 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is an elevation, drawn to reduced scale, of a receptacle-pane of modified shape;

Fig. 5 is a transverse section somewhat like Fig. 3, but showing how the receptacle may be used with liquid alone;

Fig. 6 is a transverse section similar to Fig. 3, but showing a modification; and

Fig. 7 is a front elevation showing plied to the panes of a door.

Referring to the drawing, and more particularly to Figs. 2 and 3, I there show a receptacle-pane 12 which is glazed in a part of a window frame 14. The glazing may be done by means of glazers points, not shown, and putty indicated at 16. Any conventional method of glazing may be employed. The receptacle-pane 12 comprises a pane of appropriate glazing material having secured to one face thereof a concave-convex or blister-like rethe invention apnited States Patent 2,887,824 Patented May 26, 1959 ceptacle 18. This has a peripheral flange 20, and in Fig. 3 it will be seen that in the present and most typical case, the flange 20 is plane and is secured to a flat pane 12. The junction may be by means of an adhesive or cement, or in appropriate cases by means of a solvent or welding, but in any case the joint is preferably a sealed or liquid-tight joint, so that the receptacle 18 is adapted to hold a liquid indicated at 22.

The top part of the receptacle preferably has one or more holes 24 therein, and these are made small enough on the one hand to discourage sloshing and evaporation of liquid, but on the other hand are large enough to freely receive the stems of flowers or like decorative material. In Fig. 3 a flower 26 is shown with its stem 28 inserted through hole 24. Holes that are not being used may if desired be stoppered, as indicated at 30, and ornamental stoppers are preferably provided for this purpose.

Reverting to Fig. 1, it \m'll be seen that the pane 12 is here used at the center of a window 32, the surrounding panes being conventional. However, it will be understood that more than one receptacle-pane may be employed in a window, and indeed every pane of the window may, if desired, be made a receptacle-pane.

This is illustrated in Fig. 7 in which a door 34, hinged in a stationary door frame 36, is glazed throughout with receptacle-panes 38.

It will be understood that the configuration of the receptacle may be varied. The receptacle may be circular, or it may be slightly elliptical, as shown in Figs. 1 and 2, or it may be made elliptical with a much greater eccentricity, not shown. Moreover, the receptacle may be egg-shaped or tapered toward the bottom as shown by the receptacle 40 on pane 42 in Fig. 4. Such configuration may be preferred when it is known that the receptacle is to be used primarily as a vase or flower holder.

However, the addition of flowers is not essential, and reliance may be had on the color of the receptacle, or the color of the liquid contained therein, the effect being enhanced, of course, by the daylight illumination from outside through the window. Thus in Fig. 5 the receptacle 44 on pane 46 has a single opening which is stoppered by an ornamental stopper 48, and in this case a desired decorative effect is obtained by use of a suitable colored liquid 50 in the receptacle.

In most cases the receptacle will be located on the inside of the pane. However, if desired for some special purpose, the receptacle may be located on the outside of the pane, and this is indicated by the broken line showing at 52 in Fig. 3. It is also possible to provide matched receptacles on both the inside and the outside of the pane, the situation then being as though receptacles 18 and 52 were employed simultaneously. In such case the receptacles need not be identical, and, for example, the inside receptacle may have holes to receive flowers, while the outside receptacle may be made imperforate or may have only a single hole and a stopper for the admission or removal of a liquid.

As so fardescribed the blister-like receptacle has been localized in area to the receptacle itself, except for a peripheral flange. This is not essential, however, and in Fig. 6 I show a modified form of the invention in which the receptacle '60 is a convexed part of a supplemental pane 62 which is co-extensive in area with the main pane 64. The panes 62 and 64 are secured together, and the edges of both are together glazed in the window or door frame 66 receiving the same. However, the glazing alone preferably is not relied on as the liquid seal, and instead the panes 62 and 64 are secured to one another as described for Fig. 3, and act as a single unit, even before being glazed into the frame. As before the receptacle 60 may be provided with holes 68 and ornamental stoppers for the same (not shown in Fig. 6), the holes being used, when desired, for flowers or equivalent decoration.

In a typical case the pane is made of glass, while the receptacle is molded out of a suitable plastics material. However, it will be understood that the pane may be made of a plastics material instead of glass, and, conversely, that the receptacle may be made of glass instead of a plastics material. I prefer to employ materials which are either transparent or translucent, and such materials are referred to later as being at least translucent. That expression, when it is used, is intended to exclude opaque materials, but it will be understood that in certain special cases either the pane or the receptacle, or both, may be made opaque. The materials may be clear, or tinted, or colored, and they may be either transparent or translucent, and they may be smooth or frosted. Commercial examples of usable transparent plastics are Plexiglas and Lucite.

It is believed that the construction and method of use of my invention, as Well as the advantages thereof, will be apparent from the foregoing detailed description. It will also be apparent that while I have shown and described the invcntion in several preferred forms, changes may be made in the structures shown, without departing from the scope of the invention, as sought to be defined in the foliowing claims.

I claim:

1. A receptacle-pane intended to be glazed in a door or window or lilac, said r ceptacle-pane comprising a fiat pane of appropriate glazing material which is at least translucent, said pane having secured to one face thereof a concavo-convex or blister-like receptacle made of a material which is at least translucent, the attachment of the receptacle to,the pane extending entirely around the periphery of the receptacle and being sealed or liquid-tight so that the receptacle is adapted to hold a liquid, the top part of said receptacle having one or more holes therein dimensioned to freely receive the stems of flowers or like ornaments.

2. A receptacle-pane as defined in claim 1, in which the holes of said receptacle are provided with ornamental stoppers removably received therein.

3. A receptacle-pane as defined in claim 1, in which the rim of the receptacle has a peripheral flange which is plane and which is cemented to the pane.

4. A receptacle-pane as defined in claim 1, in which the receptacle is a convexed part of a relatively thin supplemental pane which is coextensive in area with the main pane, said panes being secured together, and the edges of both being adapted to be glazed together in the window or door frame receiving the same.

5. A receptacle-pane intended to be glazed in a door or window or the like, said receptacle-pane comprising a flat glass pane which is at least translucent, said pane having secured to one face thereof a concavo-convex or blister-like receptacle made of a plastics material which is at least translucent, the attachment of the receptacle to the pane extending entirely around the periphery of the receptacle and being sealed or liquid-tight so that the receptacle is adapted to hold a liquid, the top part of said receptacle having one or more holes therein dimensioned to freely receive the stems of flowers or like ornaments.

6. A receptacle-pane as defined in claim 5, in which the holes of said receptacle are provided with ornamental stoppers removably received therein.

7. A receptacle-pane as defined in claim 5, in which the rim of the receptacle has a peripheral flange which is plane and which is cemented to the pane.

8. A receptacle-pane as defined in claim 5, in which the receptacle is a convexed part of a relatively thin supplemental pane which is coextensive in area with the main pane, said panes being secured together, and the edges of both being adapted to be glazed together in the window or door frame receiving the same.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 660,782 Strumpell Oct. 30, 1900 684,738 Adams Oct. 15, 1901 FOREIGN PATENTS 808,385 France Nov. 14, 1936

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US660782 *Jan 21, 1899Oct 30, 1900William A SchmidtMount for natural-history specimens.
US684738 *May 8, 1900Oct 15, 1901George Henry AdamsCase for stuffed birds or animals.
FR808385A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3141547 *Dec 20, 1962Jul 21, 1964Newby Chester ACombination container and microscope slide structure
US3861529 *Feb 12, 1973Jan 21, 1975Picker CorpPackage and method of making
US3879891 *Jul 27, 1973Apr 29, 1975Jones Iii John BWindow planter
US3888349 *Sep 18, 1972Jun 10, 1975Jr Raymond W MacfarlandDisplay package
US4149339 *Nov 19, 1976Apr 17, 1979Basic Designs, Inc.Hanging plant holder
US4828209 *Apr 13, 1988May 9, 1989Modern Display PlasticsDisplay vase form
US5085002 *Sep 24, 1990Feb 4, 1992Lee Jer Shyang JPortable art object wall decoration
US5301463 *Feb 1, 1993Apr 12, 1994Domurat Kevin XMutliple orientation floral stand
US6409569 *Apr 3, 2001Jun 25, 2002Stephen D. BooneContainer for liquid dissolvable capsules containing compressed, expandable toy figures
DE10107356C2 *Feb 8, 2001Jun 26, 2003Yigal Bar-YoavBildartig gestaltetes Behältnis
WO1994017655A1 *Mar 22, 1993Aug 18, 1994Kevin X DomuratFloral stand
Classifications
U.S. Classification47/41.1, 206/423, 206/216, 206/461
International ClassificationE06B7/00, A47G7/00, E06B7/28, A47G7/06
Cooperative ClassificationA47G7/06, E06B7/28
European ClassificationA47G7/06, E06B7/28