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Publication numberUS2888013 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 26, 1959
Filing dateNov 27, 1957
Priority dateNov 27, 1957
Publication numberUS 2888013 A, US 2888013A, US-A-2888013, US2888013 A, US2888013A
InventorsLevitt Milton R
Original AssigneeScholl Mfg Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Foot corrective pad with toe loop
US 2888013 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 26, 1959 M. R. LEVITT FOOT CORRECTIVE 'PAD WITH TOE LOOP Filed Nov. 27, 1957 3 Sheets-Sheet 1- M/l 707V A. zzr/rf May 26, 1959 M. R. LEVlTT FOOT CORRECTIVE PAD WITH TOE LOOP 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed NOV. 27, 1957 M. R. LEVlTT FOOT CORRECTIVE PAD WITH TOE LOOP May 26, 1959 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed NOV. 2'7, 1957 United States Patent 2,888,013 Patented May 26, 1959 FOOT CORRECTIVE PAD WITH TOELOQP Milton R. Levitt, New Brunswick, N.J., assignorto The Scholl Mfg. Co., Inc., Chicago, 111;, a corporation of New York Application November27, 1957, Serial.No.. 699,338

15 Claims. (Cl. 128-153) This invention relates to improvements in a foot corrective pad with a toe loop, and more particularly to a foot corrective pad having a composite. crescent-shaped bodyportion and a toe loop to hold the pad in position on the. foot, the invention being highly desirable for use in connection with corns in substantially any location on the toes, hammer toe, a plurality of cums on the same or adjacent toes, as well as for other afflictions and loca: tions, as will be apparent toone skilled in the art.

In the past, many and various types offoot corrective pads for corns and similar afllictions have been de-, veloped; but. insofar as I am aware .these pads were-not sufficiently versatile in their usage. Insomeinstances, the pads .were attached to the bodyby adhesivemeans whichiunder many circumstances is quite irritating to the user, and in other cases difiicult of application, especial- 1y between the toes and in positions where perspiration mayv tend to-loosen the pad and thus permit it toshift from its proper location. In instances where these formerly known pads had toe loopsfor :embracinga toe to holdthe pad in proper position on the foot, the pads were .somewhat limited in their application, particularly since they could not be applied in substantially any desired. position and in reference vto substantiallyany de-v sired. toe. Further, pads-of this character heretofore known .did notalleviate aplurality of afilictions at-the same time, either at the same or adjacenttoes. Inaddition, it may be mentioned that foot. corrective pads, particularly the variety carrying a toeloop; as heretofore manufactured were. objectionably expensive, and. in most casesv could not be laundered-or otherwise cleansed whenv necessary.

Withthe foregoing in mind, it is an important object of theinstant invention to provide a corrective pad highly suitablefor disposition by means .of a toe loop on sub+ stantially any toe of the foot and in substantially any location on thattoe.

Also an object of this invention is the provision of a simple form of corn pad held in position by a toe loop, and .which is capable of alleviating aplurality of corns or similar afliictions at the same time.

A further object of the instant invention resides-in the provision of a foot corrective pad which may perform any of severaldifferent functions, such as giving corrective aidandsupport to a hammer toe, or be positioned at the side of the toe and simultaneously alleviatexa corn or like affliction in that location, as .well asalleviate a corn or like affliction between that toe and the next adjacent one. A further feature of the invention resides in the provision of a foot corrective pad retained in position by a toeloop, and which may be economically and quickly manufacturedfrom a simple blank-or pattern, and which maybe made. of such material that the pad may be laundered.oraotherwis'e cleansed Whenever necessary.

It is also an object of this invention to provide a foot corrective pad that is substantially universal in its application, directly to,the.- toes of the footand more particularlyas to location onthe toe, and which pad may be applied andremoved at will, and reapplied in the sameor, a different location.

While some of the more salient features, characteristics and advantages of the instant invention have been above pointed out, others will become apparent from the following disclosures, taken in conjunction with-the accompanying drawing, in which Fig. l is a fragmentary diagrammatic view of the human foot showing. a foot corrective pad in operative position on the foot, and which pad embodies principles of the instant invention;

Fig. 2. is a greatly enlarged front, end view of the pad of Fig. 1, looking at the pad from the lefthand side of Fig. 1;

Fig.3 is a central vertical sectional view through the pad taken substantially as indicated by the line Ill-lll ofFig. 2, looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig, 4 is a top plan view of the blank or pattern from which the corrective pad of Figs. 1, land 3 is shaped;

Fig. 5 is a view similar in character to Fig. 1 showing a foot corrective pad of somewhat different construction, but also embodying principles of the instant invention, applied to the,- human foot in operative posit-ion;

Fig-. 6 is a greatly enlarged front end elevational view ofthe pad itself removed from the foot;

Fig. 7 is a transverse vertical sectional view taken substantially as indicated by theline VII-V-II of Fig. 6;

Fig. 8. is atop plan view of the blank or pattern from whichr;the pad;.of Figs. 5,v 6 and 711's formed;

Fig. ,9 istaaview similar in character-to Figs. 1 and 5, showing another form of foot corrective pad embodying principles Of';th instant, inventionproper-ly applied to. a humanifoot;

Fig. 1-0,is,-,azfr ont1 endv'elevational view, greatly en-, larged, Ofithepad -of Fig.;9 removed from the;foot;'

Fig: 11 'is,.a bottom-"plan:,sectionabviewv taken sub stantially asindicated-by the line. Xl-XI of Fig, 19;

Fig;v 12 isaa; plan view of a.;blank or; pattern-from which; thepadof: Figs. 9,; l0 and '1 1 may be shaped;

Fig. 13 is a front end elevational view of a pad-of a stillt' different; construction; but; embodying principles of the instant, invention;-

Fig. l4iis a central vertical sectional viewtaken substantially as; indicated: by the line XIVXIV of Fig. 13;

Fig;;,15 :is. a; top plan viewof ;a blank.- or pattern from which 'the. pad of Figs, 13;and l4'may be shaped; and

Fig;; l6';is,- a-.top; pl'an view ofa foot-corrective pad made of diiferent material;

As shownyon the drawings:

With; reference-now to..Fig s-.- l to 4 inclusive, it will be seen that one use -for =the, first illustrated, embodiment of theinstant; 'iHYfifltiOIlgjS the. alleviation of an affliction ,such as hammer toe, with-'theremoval of shoe pressure from: thehigh; point of the toe which is subject to extreme; irritation even; if :a cornhas, notv developed. I at that point, as frequently happens.- In this instance, the pad is shown mounted in. operativeupositionon they human foot 1,, engaged aroundythesecondtoeZ? of the foot, the pad being, generally indicated-by numeral 3. This pad may beeasily shaped from; a'blank' or patter-not materialysuchas'is shown -in--Fig.=; 4. The.-material,utilizedxis preferably cushioning material and ,it-m-ay be a foam material, suchas foamwlatex, or a; chemicaldoam of the character of polyurethanefoamy polyvinyl'chlo ride foam, or'the equivalent; Preferably, the foam material has intercommunicating cells" so that it can breathe by pumping air-during successive applications of pressure and release thereofwwhile in use. Also preferably, when the pad' is made of foam material as-illustrated, it is provided with a slick thin cover designated 4 in Fig. 2 so as to eliminate any drag on wearing apparel such as stockings when the same is pulled on or off the foot, and this thin cover may be a slick surfaced fabric, a thin plastic film or the equivalent, and it is preferably provided with numerous perforations 5.

The blank or pattern, which is one piece of material, comprises a pair of opposed broad crescent-shaped body portions 6 and 7 each of which has substantially straight side edges, but complemental arcuate end edges. These body portions are connected by a relatively narrow neck 8 disposed at right angles to the axis of each body member, and connecting the body members at adjacent ends where the edge is concave. Extending from the opposite side of the neck from that of the body members is an auxiliary pad 9 of the same general shape as each body member but in reverse position, so that the con cave or notched end 10 of the pad 9 is, in eifect, a hollow portion in the neck 8 itself. In most cases, the auxiliary pad 9 will extend from the center of the neck 8, although this is not essential. However, with a hammer toe or where treatment is to be made on the opposite side of a toe at the same time, such location spaces the auxiliary pad circumferentially from the body parts 6 and 7 the proper distance.

In forming the pad from the blank of Fig. 4, it is a simple expedient to rotate the body portion 7 a complete revolution and bring it underneath the body portion 6, whereupon the two body portions are secured together in face-to-face relationship by any suitable means, such as a cementitious material. It is not essential that that particular movement be adopted in superposing the body parts 6 and 7 in the manner to cause the neck 8 to form a toe loop, but any motion or conjoint pair of motions that accomplishes that result is satisfactory. The foam pad, therefore, has the slick covering on the outside of the auxiliary pad 9, and on the bottom side of the composite body part where the slick surface will contact articles of apparel, while the naked foam surface of the body part 6 and also of the auxiliary pad 9 will directly contact the toe of the foot and provide a soft clinging action on the skin which augments the function of the toe loop 8 in holding the pad positively in position on the foot against shifting during usage.

In the case of a hammer toe, the pad may he slipped over the toe into the position seen in Fig. 1, with the auxiliary pad 9 overlying the top rearward portion of the toe, and the high point of the toe may be received within the arcuately notched forward edge 10 of the auxiliary pad 9, whereby pressure of the shoe is transferred to healthy tissue adjacent the painful high spot of the toe. At the same time, the conjoint body part made up of the portions 6 and 7 underlies the forward end of the toe, so as to relieve irritation resulting from the unnatural contact of the forward end of the toe against the insole of the shoe, and at the same time lend aid for the straightening of the hammer toe. While I have illustrated the pad mounted on the toe with the single thickness auxiliary pad portion 9 at the top of the toe, it will be understood that the double thickness composite body part of the pad may be placed on top of the toe with the auxiliary pad portion 9 underlying the forward edge of the toe, should occasion indicate.

Now if desired, the same identical pad might be utilized on another toe and for a difierent purpose. For example, the pad might be disposed so that the body part or auxiliary pad as the occasion may dictate, may overlie the wide part of the foot adjacent a terminal metatarsal head, while the other part of the pad may extend between the terminal and next adjacent toe to alleviate some addiction in that location.

Thus, it will be noted that the pad is not only extremely simple in construction, economical to manufacture and readily cleansable whenever desired, but it is also universal in its application and may be eifectively utilized for the alleviation of a number of afilictions of diiferent character. In certain instances of its use, it will also alleviate a plurality of aiiiictions in diiferent locations simultaneously.

In Figs. 5 to 8 inclusive, I have illustrated a slightly 'diiferent form of corrective pad, highly desirable for the alleviation of pressure on hard corns and the like on the tops of the toes and on the outer side of the terminal toes, although it may be used to alleviate mild callosities or similar afllictions on the underface of any toe. In this instance, the pad is formed of the same material as above described, and is made from a blank or pattern similar to that seen in Fig. 4, but wherein the auxiliary pad portion 9 has been eliminated. In this instance, the pattern comprises merely a pair of spaced broad crescent-shaped body parts 11 and 12 each of which has a relatively deep notch or arcuate edge formation 13 at the end portion joined by a substantially straight and relatively narrow neck 14. The blank is shaped into the finished corrective pad as described above, by superposing the body parts 11 and 12 in a manner to cause the neck 14 to form a toe loop. Of course, in so superposing the body parts, the slick covering on the foam material is disposed on the outside of the toe loop and on the outer surface of the uppermost body part 11, so as to contact the wearing apparel and prevent drag thereon.

This particular foot corrective pad may be utilized in substantially any desirous location on any toe of the foot. In the illustrated embodiment, Fig. 5, it is shown in position to alleviate pressure on a corn on the top of the toe, the affliction being received in the arcuate end 13 of the composite body part of the pad. The toe loop 14 being substantially at right angles to the body portion of the pad permits positive securement of the pad on a toe, and particularly an intermediate toe.

In Figs. 9, 10, 11 and 12, I have shown a still different form of foot corrective pad, and in this instance the pad is substantially the same as that of Figs. 5 to 8 inclusive, except it is provided with an auxiliary pad for the alleviation of an additional affliction. This pad is highly desirable for the relief of a corn or the like on the side of a toe, and the simultaneous relief of a corn or the like between that toe and the next adjacent toe.

The pad structure shown in Figs. 9 to 12 inclusive embodies the same opposed body parts 11 and 12 with the arcuate edge indentation l3, and the same neck 14 disposed in the same location between the body parts, as above described in connection with Figs. 5 to 8 inclusive. In this instance, however, an auxiliary pad portion 15 is carried by the neck 14, this pad portion having substantially straight sides with a rounded projecting end, and extends farther from the neck in the direction of the concave edges 13 of the body parts 11 and 12 than it does in the opposite direction. The auxiliary pad portion is provided with an affliction receiving aperture 16. On the opposite side of the neck 14, the auxiliary pad projects slightly and is provided with a curvate concave edge as indicated at 17.

This form of the invention is quite desirable for disposition around substantially any toe of the foot, and in Fig. 9 it is illustrated around the small or fifth toe, with the composite body part made up of the superposed parts 11 and 12 on the outside of the toe in position to relieve pressure from a corn on the outer side of the toe. At the same time, the auxiliary pad 15 is disposed between the fourth and fifth toes to relieve pressure from a corn on either of these toes, such corn being received in the aperture 16 of the auxiliary pad 15. It is well known that the webs of the foot between adjacent toes are not in a straight transverse line across the foot, but the Web between the second and third toe is farther forward than the web between the third and fourth toe, which is farther forward than the webs between either the first and second toes or the fourth and fifth toes. With the auxiliary pad .15 placed between the toes, the concave curvate edge17 will intimately fit the web, while the composite body portion of the appliance may be disposed farther rearwardly. As seen in Fig. 9, the concave edge 17 intimately fits the web between the fourth and fifth toes, but the composite body part 11--12 extends farther toward the rear of the foot than that edge 17 and the pad is held firmly and comfortably in position against accidental shifting.

In Figs. 13, 14 and 15, I have illustrated a'still different structure of the instant invention, inthis case the pad being somewhat similar to that shown in Figs. 5 to 8 inelusive, but the neck is disposed in a diiferent location between the body parts, andeachbody part is provided with an afiiiction receiving aperture. The pattern'for this form of the invention is seen in Fig. 15 This form of the invention includes a pair of spaced'body parts 18 and 19,

each of which has straight-side edges, and complementally curvate edges with one of the end edges being concave as indicated at 20, and each body piece has an afiliction receiving aperture 2.1 therein. Thebody pieces are connected by a relatively narrow neck 22 which joins the body parts nearer the convex ends than the concave ends thereof. The body parts 18-and-19 are superpos'edand secured together in the manner above described, and a foot corrective appliance or pad is produced which is highly suitable for the alleviationof more than'one corn or the like on the same toe, or where corns and the like are in very close proximity to each other, as is frequently the case. The device may be looped over the toe with the arcuate edge 20 of the composite body toward the end of the toe or toward the base of the toe, as the case may indicate, and one afiliction may be received in the aligned aper tures 21 of the body parts, while pressure from another adjacent afiiiction may be eliminated by the composite body with the afiliction shielded by the arcuate edge 20. The pad can be mounted between adjacent toes and relieve a corn or similar affiiction on each of the toes at the same time, and the appliance may be mounted in substantially any desired position of angular adjustment as to any toe.

In Fig. 16, as a means of illustrating that the instant invention in any of its illustrated forms may be made of a fabric material such as felt, or similar cushioning material, I have shown a pad which, in the illustrated instance is of the character of the pads seen in Figs. 13 to 15 inclusive, but which as stated above is merely exemplary of the fact that any of the illustrated forms of the instant invention may be made of different material than the foam material shown. Wherever a pad is made of a fabric such as felt, the overlapping body portions may be secured together by lines of stitching as indicated at 23 and 24- in Fig. 16. Preferably, this stitching does not extend transversely of the pad in the intermediate portion thereof, but only at a bounding edge, so as to eliminate any points of undue stiffness or rigidity in the body of the pad.

From the foregoing, it is apparent that I have provided a simple form of foot corrective appliance or pad which may be made in a variety of shapes and sizes for the alleviation of various types and locations of come and other similar affiictions. The pad is applicable to the toes in substantially any desired location, capable of alleviating a plurality of afllictions at the same time, and capable of alleviating other types of afilictions such as hammer toe for example.

It will be understood that modifications and variations may be efiected without departing from the scope of the novel concepts of the present invention.

I claim as my invention:

1. A foot corrective appliance comprising a pair of like body parts, an integral and relatively narrow neck connecting said body parts, said body parts being secured together in superposed relationship and said neck forming a toe loop, each body part having the contour of a broad crescent.

2. A foot corrective appliance comprising a pair of like body parts, an integral and relatively narrow neck connecting said body parts, said body parts being secured together in superposed relationship and said neck forming a toe loop, eachbody part having the contour of a broad crescent and said neck connecting parallel side edges of said body parts.

3; A foot corrective appliance comprising a pair of like body parts, an integral and relatively narrow neck connectingsaid body parts, said body parts being secured together in superposed'relationship and said neck forming a toe loop, each body part having the contour of a broad crescent, and an auxiliary pad part carried by said neck and disposed at right angles thereto, said auxiliary part having a concave arcuate edge at the end thereof nearer the neck.

4. A foot corrective appliance comprising a pair of like body parts, an integral and relatively narrow neck connecting said body parts, said body parts being secured together in superposed relationship and said neck forming a toe loop, each body part having the contour of a broad crescent, and an auxiliary pad part carried by said neck and disposed at right angles thereto, said body parts being solid, and said auxiliary part having an affliction receiving aperture therein.

5. A foot corrective appliance comprising a pair of like body parts, an integral and relatively narrow neck connecting said body parts, said body parts being secured together in superposed relationship and said neck forming a toe loop, each body part having straight side edges and complemental arcuate end edges with the neck connecting side edges of the body parts.

6. In a foot corrective appliance, a pair of body parts superposed and secured together, a relatively narrow neck joining said body parts and forming a toe loop, each of said body parts extending away from said neck farther to one side than the other and the long axes of the body parts being at right angles to the neck, each body part having a concave recessed end edge near the neck.

7. In a foot corrective appliance, a pair of body parts superposed and secured together, a relatively narrow neck joining said body parts and forming a toe loop, each of said body parts extending away from said neck farther to one side than the other and the long axes of the body parts being at right angles to the neck, each body part having a rounded convex end edge and a recessed concave end edge nearer the neck than the convex edge.

8. In a foot corrective appliance, a pair of body parts superimposed and secured together, a relatively narrow neck joining said body parts and forming a toe loop, each of said body parts extending away from said neck farther to one side than the other and the long axes of the body parts being at right angles to the neck, each body part having a rounded convex end edge and a recessed concave end edge nearer the neck than the convex edge, and an auxiliary pad part of similar shape to said body parts but oppositely disposed and carried by said neck intermediate the ends thereof.

9. A foot corrective appliance comprising a pair of like body parts superposed and secured together in faceto-face relationship, each body part having straight side edges and arcuate end edges one concave and one convex, and a relatively narrow neck joining side edges of said body parts and forming a toe loop, said body parts having affliction receiving apertures therein.

10. A foot corrective appliance comprising a pair of like body parts superposed and secured together in faceto-face relationship, each body part having straight side edges and arcuate end edges one concave and one convex, and a relatively narrow neck joining side edges of said body parts and forming a toe loop, said body parts having affliction receiving apertures therein, said neck being connected to said body parts nearer the convex edges than the concave edges.

11. A foot corrective appliance comprising a pair of like body parts superposed and secured together in faceto-face relationship, each body part having straight side edges and arcuate end edges one concave and one convex, and a relatively narrow neck joining side edges of said body parts and forming a toe loop, said neck being connected to said body parts nearer the concave edges than the convex edges.

12. A foot corrective appliance comprising a pair of like body parts superposed and secured together in faceto-face relationship, each body part having straight side edges and arcuate end edges one concave and one convex, and a relatively narrow neck joining side edges of said body parts and forming a toe loop, and an auxiliary pad part of similar shape to said body parts but in reverse disposition carried by said neck intermediate the ends thereof.

13. A foot corrective appliance comprising a pair of like body parts superposed and secured together in faceto-face relationship, each body part having straight side edges and arcuate end edges one concave and one convex, and a relatively narrow neck joining side edges of said body parts and forming a toe loop, and an auxiliary pad part of similar shape to said body parts but in reverse disposition carried by said neck intermediate the ends thereof, said neck being joined to said body parts and 8 said auxiliary part nearer the concave end of each than the convex end.

14. A foot corrective appliance comprising a pair of like body parts superposed and secured together in faceto-face relationship, each body part having straight side edges and arcuate end edges one concave and one convex, a relatively narrow neck joining side edges of said body parts and forming a toe loop, an auxiliary pad part of similar shape to said body parts but in reverse disposition carried by said neck intermediate the ends thereof, and said body parts and said auxiliary part being solid.

15. A foot corrective appliance comprising a pair of like body parts superposed and secured together in faceto-face relationship, each body part having straight side edges and arcuate end edges one concave and one convex, a relatively narrow neck joining side edges of said body parts and forming a toe loop, and an auxiliary pad part of similar shape to said body parts but in reverse disposition carried by said neck intermediate the ends thereof, said body parts being solid and said auxiliary part having an afiiiction receiving aperture therein.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 895,145 Bauer Aug. 4, 1908

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US895145 *Mar 1, 1907Aug 4, 1908Bauer & BlackCorn and bunion plaster.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3036571 *Jul 13, 1960May 29, 1962Scholl William MSurgical pad
US3088461 *Apr 3, 1961May 7, 1963Scholl Mfg Co IncSurgical pad with digit loop
US3088860 *Jun 24, 1959May 7, 1963William M SchollMethod of making a surgical pad
US3113568 *Dec 26, 1961Dec 10, 1963Eric K ErskineStyptic bandage
US3157178 *Dec 14, 1961Nov 17, 1964Oneida LtdDressing
US3209750 *Mar 31, 1961Oct 5, 1965Scholl Mfg Co IncDigit embracing surgical pads
US4940046 *Nov 14, 1983Jul 10, 1990Jacoby Richard PPost-operative bunion splint
US7849610 *Mar 3, 2006Dec 14, 2010Clough James GOrthopedic shoe appliance and method
US20070204487 *Mar 3, 2006Sep 6, 2007Clough James GOrthopedic shoe appliance and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification128/894, 602/62
International ClassificationA61F5/01
Cooperative ClassificationA61F5/019
European ClassificationA61F5/01E