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Publication numberUS2888062 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 26, 1959
Filing dateSep 5, 1957
Priority dateSep 5, 1957
Publication numberUS 2888062 A, US 2888062A, US-A-2888062, US2888062 A, US2888062A
InventorsLockwood William H
Original AssigneeLockwood William H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Convertible article of furniture
US 2888062 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

- May 26, 1959 w. H. LOCKWOOD CONVERTIBLE ARTICLE OF FURNITURE Filed Sept. 5, 1957 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. W/LLMM H. LCM/(W000 y 1959 w. H. LOCKWOOD CONVERTIBLE ARTICLE OF FURNITURE 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Sept. 5-, 1957 INVENTOR. W/LL/A/W H. LOCK WOOD ATT RNEYS May 26, 195 w. HJLOCKWOOD CONVERTIBLE ARTICLE OF FURNITURE 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed-Sept. 5, 1957 m mw K NC m0 ATTORNEYS United States Patent CONVERTIBLE ARTICLE OF FURNITURE William H. Lockwood, Brightwaters, N.Y.

Application September 5, 1957, Serial No. 682,185

4 Claims. (Cl. 155-42) The present invention relates to an article of furniture convertible for different uses, and in particular to a chair or chair-ladder combination convertible to use as an ironing board. The chair can also be used as a highchair, and the highchair attachment can be used to add to the length of the ironing board or can be used independently as a bed tray or the like.

Multi-purpose articles of furniture have long been in demand, particularly by apartment dwellers who have but a minimal amount of storage space available to them. The need for such products has been greatly accentuated in recent years because the greatly increased cost of living accommodations has caused people to take apartments or houses with a fewer number of rooms than was formerly the case, thus requiring that a given room serve a multiplicity of purposes. For example, it is quite common for the kitchen to double as a laundry room.

An ironing board is virtually a necessity in any well run household. It must necessarily be of appreciable size if it is to be effective, and consequently it presents an appreciable storage problem. Moreover, it is often no mean task for the average housewife to lift an ironing board and carry it to its assigned storage space. Chairs, and preferably ones which can be climbed upon safely so as to permit access to high kitchen shelves, are also a necessity. It is therefore not surprising that there have in the past been many proposals for the construction of combined chairs (and ladders) with ironing boards. These prior art structures have, however, suffered from the drawback that the effectiveness of the ironing board had to be sacrificed to the effectiveness of the chair, or vice versa. This is particularly the case insofar as the height of the ironing board above the floor is concerned. Either the chair was too high or the ironing board was too low. Moreover, and this is symptomatic even of ironing boards per se, the ironing surface is usually at a fixed height above the floor, which is appropriate for a person of a standard height but which is inappropriate and often most uncomfortable for persons either taller or shorter than that standard height.

Accordingly the ironing board-chair combination of the present invention has been so designed that the height of the ironing board above the floor can be adjusted to fit the needs of the particular person utilizing the same, while at the same time the ironing board can be folded up to an unobstrusive position in which it constitutes an operative part of a chair. Insofar as the combinative aspects of this structure are concerned, this permits the seat of the chair to be positioned at optimum height above the floor without in any way restricting or limiting the height of the ironing board.

An additional virtue of the construction in question resides in the fact that the same mechanism which permits the ironing board height to be adjusted also permits adjustment of the depth of the chair seat, that is to say,

port, thus permitting the chair to be accommodated to 1C6 2,888,062 Patented May 26, 1959 the size or preferences of the particular person sitting in it.

Optionally, a tray assembly is detachably associated with the chair so as to convert the ladder, when desired, into a highchair, the tray assembly itself, when detached from the chair, being useable as a bed tray. The tray assembly comprises a tray and a frame which are also separable from one another, and the tray, considered individually, is adapted to be attached to the ironing board so as to constitute a prolongation thereof, thereby either providing additional ironing surface or a support for the iron when the latter is not in use.

To the accomplishment of the above, and to such other objects as may hereinafter appear, the present invention relates to the structure of a convertible item of furniture as defined in the appended claims and as described in this specification, taken together with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a three-quarter perspective view of the chair and tray assembly with the ironing board parts folded to inoperative position;

Fig. 2 is a similar view but with the tray assembly detached, the ironing board folded to operative position, and the tray portion of the tray assembly attached to the ironing board;

Fig. 3 is a cross sectional view taken along the line 3-3 of Fig. 2 and showing one way in which the tray may be attached to the ironing board;

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary top plan view of the structure shown in Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary top plan view of a portion of the tray showing the manner in which the tray frame is releasably attached thereto; 1

Fig. 6 is a cross sectional view, taken along the line 66 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 7 is a front elevational view of the chair in the condition shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 8 is a side elevational view thereof;

Fig. 9 is a side elevational view of the article of furniture in the position shown in Fig. 2;

Fig. 10 is an elevational and partly cross sectioned view taken along the line 10-10 of Fig. 9;

Fig. 11 is a side elevational view of the structure shown in Fig. 10; v

Fig. 12 is a cross sectional view taken along the line 12--12 of Fig. 10;

Fig. 13 is a cross sectional view taken along the line 13-13 of Fig. 9; and

Fig. 14 is a detailed top plan view of the hinge between the ironing board sections.

The device of the present invention includes a support comprising legs 2 secured to a chair seat generally designated 4. As may best be seen in Figs. 2 and 8, each pair of legs 2 at each side of the device are connected by a forwardly extending crosspiece 6. If desired, steps 10 may be fastened in any appropriate manner between the front legs 2 so that the device can be used as a step ladder when desired.

The seat 4- comprises a front part 12 which is fixed to the crosspiece 6 by means of nuts and bolts 8 and a rear'part 14 which is pivotally connected to the front part 12 in any appropriate manner, as by means of the hinge 16, so as to be movable between the horizontal position shown in Figs. 1, 7 and 8, then constituting a rearward extension of the forward part 12, and a raised position shown in Figs. 2, 9 and 11. Cushions '18 may, if desired, be secured to the upper surfaces of the seat parts 12 and 14 in any appropriate manner, as is conventional. A rim 20 extends around the front and side surfaces of the seat 4, including the side surfaces of the "rear seat portion 14 when the ladder is in horizontal position, and a side portion of that rim, designated 20,is pivotally connected to the front seat portion 12 at 22 and is movable between the horizontal position shown in Fig. l and the raised position shown in Fig. 2, the lower edge thereof adjacent its free end being notched at 24 so as to engage with a pin 26 extending from the side of the rear seat portion 14 when the latter is in raised position, thereby serving to retain the rear seat portion 14 in that raised position.

The back of the chair is defined by a panel 28 which also constitutes one of the sections of the ironing board portion of the device. Another section of the ironing board is defined by the panel 30 connected to one end of the panel 28 by means of leaf 32 which is hinged to the panels 28 and 30 (see Fig. 14). That surface of the panel 28 which is visible in Fig. 1 may, if desired, he upholstered similarly to the upper surfaces of the seat parts 12 and 14. The other surface of the panel 28, and the facing surface of the panel 30, are provided with pads 34 in conventional ironing board manner. These pads 34 are surrounded, on the sides and the unconnected ends of the panels 28 and 30, by metallic rims 36. The rim portion 36 at the unconnected end of the panel 28 is preferably spaced from the corresponding end of the pad 34, as may be seen in Fig. 4, for a purpose hereinafter set forth.

Secured to that surface of the panel 28 facing forwardly in Fig. 1 are a pair of arms 40 spaced laterally from one another and provided with gear teeth 42 on their facing edges, those gear teeth defining racks. The lower surface of the rear seat part 14 is provided with brackets 43 which define channels within which the arms 40 are slidably received. Between the arms 40 a pair of pinions 44 are mounted on the undersurface of the seat part 14 so as to mesh with the racks 42 and rotate with shafts 46, these shafts being elongated and carrying additional pinions 48 rotatable therewith but spaced from the pinions 44. A bracket 50 secured to the undersurface of the seat part 14 carries a rotatably mounted worm 52 which meshes with the pinions 48, the shaft 54 of the worm 52 extending out beyond the bracket 50 and terminating in an actuating handle 56.

Thus it will be seen that the panel 28 is directly secured to the rear seat part 14 by means of the arms 40, that the panel 30 is secured to the seat 4 by means of the panel 28, and that rotation of the handle 56 will, through rotation of the worm 52 and the pinions 48 and 44, cause the arms 49 to slide inwardly and outwardly relative to the undersurface of the seat part 14, thus causing the panel 28, and with it, the panel 36, to move toward or away from the end of the seat part 14. It will further be noted that the panel 28 is oriented substantially perpendicular to the seat part 14.

The free end of the panel 30 has an arm 58 pivotally secured thereto at 60, and that arm is adapted to telescope within a tube 62 pivotally secured between the rear legs 2 on the crosspiece 64. A thumb screw 66 is provided for engaging the arm 58 and holding it in desired telescoped position within the tube 62.

By reason of the above described structure, when the seat part 14 is in horizontal position, as it will be when the chair is to he sat or climbed upon, the panel 28 will be in substantially vertical position and will define the back support portion of the chair. Its distance from the front edge of the seat 4 can be adjusted by rotating the crank handle 56, so that the depth of the chair can be varied to suit individual requirements or preferences. The panel 30 will, as is clearly shown in Fig. 8, fold up behind the panel 28, and the linkage 58, 62 will be positioned behind the panel 30.

When the device is to be used as an ironing board the rear seat portion 14 is swung to its substantially vertical position shown in Figs. 2 and 911. The engagement between the notch 24 on the movable seat rim portion 20' and the pin 26 on the rear seat portion 14 will retain the ladder in that position. The panel 28 will thus be moved to substantially horizontal position and with its padded ironing board surface uppermost, and the panel 30 will swing to a position in line therewith, as clearly shown in Figs. 2 and 9, the leaf hinge 32 permitting accurate alignment of the panels 28 and 30 despite the fact that they carry comparatively thick pads 34. Alignment between the panels 28 and 3t! is further facilitated by means of the angle iron 68 secured to the underside of the panel 30* and extending beyond its hinged end so that, when the panels 28 and 30 are in their position shown in Fig. 9, the tips of the angle irons 68 engage the underside of the panel 28. The arm 58 will, of course, be free to telescope with respect to the tube 62 to permit the attainment of this position. Thereafter, by rotating the crank handle 56 exposed on the rear surface of the seat part 14, the height of the panel 28 above the ground can be adjusted, the panel 30 will move along therewith, and after the desired height has been achieved a tightening of the thumb screw 66 against the arm 58 will firmly and reliably support the free end of the panel 30 at the desired height.

For purposes of utilizing the chair as a highchair for children, a highchair tray assembly generally designated '70 is provided. It comprises a tray proper 72 and a frame generally designated 74. As here disclosed the frame is constituted by arm portions 76, rear leg portrons '78 and forward leg portions 30. The frames 74 are secured to the tray 72 by reason of the fact that the arm portions 76 have forwardly projecting parts 82 frictionally or otherwise detachably received within sleeves 84 forming a part of the tray 72. The tray assembly 70 is therefore capable of independent use as a unit in the manner of a bed tray or the like. It is, furthermore, attachable to the previously described chair, as by havng its rear leg portions '78 received within apertures 86 in the rear legs 2 of the chair, there to be retained by any suitable catch mechanism 83, and by having the tips 90 of the forward legs received within apertures in the front seat part 12.

The tray proper 72 may have its surface visible in Fig. 1 formed of formica or the like and surrounded by a raised rim 94 so as to function efficiently as a highchair eating surface. The inner end of the tray 72 is preferably curved in a manner conforming to the curvature of the free end of the panel 28, and the rim 94 at that inner surface may be provided with an upturned rim portion 94. Hence if the tray proper 7?. is detached from the frames 74 and is inverted it can be attached to the end of the ironing board panel 28, its rim portion 94 (now down turned because of the inversion of the tray proper 72) fitting over the rim portion 36' of the panel 28 and into the space between that rim portion 36 and the pad 34 carried by the ironing board surface of the panel 28, all as may be seen in Figs. 2, 3 and 4. The thus exposed surface of the tray 72 may be provided with a pad 34', the tray 72 thus constituting an extension or prolongation of the ironing board when the ladder is in operative position, providing additional ironing surface and also conveniently functioning as a stand for the iron when the ladder is not in use.

From the above it will be seen that the device of the present invention has numerous advantages. Considered solely as an ironing board, it provides for adjustment of the height of the ironing board surface. Considered solely as a chair it provides for adjustment of the depth of the seat. From a combinative point of view it permits the chair to be designed for optimum comfort and sittability without having to take into account the necessity that the ironing board he a predetermined height above the floor when in operative position. The chair can be used either for normal sitting or as a highchair for infants, the highchair attachment is independently useable, and the tray portion thereof can be used in conjunction with the ironing board to provide for additional ironing board surface. All of these desirable results are achieved by means of a simple and sturdy structure which requires no high degree of precision in manufacture, which may be readily assembled, and which produces a sturdy device well capable of withstanding the forces to which it may be subjected in any of its various modes of use.

While but a single embodiment of the present invention has been here disclosed it will be apparent that many variations may be made therein, all within the scope of the present invention as defined in the following claims.

I claim:

1. An ironing board-chair combination comprising a frame including a seat and legs, panel-mounting means carried by said frame and articulately mounted relative to said legs, a panel, an element fixed to said panel and extending therefrom substantially at right angles thereto for an appreciable distance, said element overlapping said panel-mounting means and being movable relative thereto in a direction substantially perpendicular to the plane of said panel, means on said panel-mounting means for engaging said element and selectively retaining it in a desired one of a plurality of positions relative to said panelmounting means, said element constituting substantially the sole means of attachment of said panel to said frame, said panel and panel-mounting means being movable between a first operative position in which said panel is substantially vertical and located completely behind said seat, thereby defining at least in part the back of said chair, and a second operative position in which said panel is in a substantially horizontal position above and overlying said seat, thereby serving as an ironing board, adjustment of the position of said element relative to said panel-mounting means when said panel is in said second operative position resulting in adjustment of the height of said ironing board, and means for retaining said panel in said second operative position.

2. An ironing board-chair combination comprising a frame including a seat and legs, said seat having a part articulately mounted on the remainder of said frame so as to be movable between substantially horizontal and substantially vertical positions, panel mounting means carried by said movable seat part and movable therewith between said horizontal and vertical positions, a panel, an element fixed to said panel and extending therefrom substantially at right angles thereto for an appreciable distance, said element overlapping said panel-mounting means and being movable relative thereto in a direction substantially perpendicular to the plane of said panel, means on said panel-mounting means for engaging said element and selectively retaining it in a desired one of a plurality of positions relative to said panel-mounting means, said element constituting substantially the sole means of attachment of said panel to said frame, movement of said seat part to its substantially horizontal position moving said panel to a first operative position in which said panel is substantially vertical and located completely behind said seat, thereby defining at least in part the back of said chair, movement of said seat part to its substantially vertical position moving said panel to a second operative position in which said panel is in a substantially horizontal position above and overlying said seat, thereby serving as an ironing board, adjustment of the position of said element relative to said panel-mounting means when said panel is in said second operative position resulting in adjustment of the height of said ironing board, and means forretaining said panel in said second operative position.

3. An ironing board-chair combination comprising a frame including a seat and legs, a panel carried by said frame and articulately mounted relative to said legs, said panel being movable between a first operative position in which said panel is substantially vertical and located adjacent the rear of said seat to serve as a back therefor and a second operative position in which said panel is in a substantially horizontal position above said seat, thereby serving as an ironing board, a tray assembly comprising a tray detachably connected to a tray frame, said tray frame being detachably connected to said chair frame I and effective to position said tray in highchair relation to said seat and panel, said ironing board panel at one end thereof and said tray having interengageable parts for supporting said tray on said end of said ironing board panel, whereby said tray constitutes a prolongation of said ironing board, and means for retaining said panel in said second operative position.

4. The combination of claim 3, in which said ironing board panel comprises a rim surrounding a pad and having a rim portion spaced from said pad adjacent said end of said ironing board panel, said tray comprising a rim having a portion shaped similarly to said ironing board panel rim at said end of said ironing board panel, said tray rim having a downturned rim portion adapted to be received between said ironing board panel rim portion and said pad, said ironing board panel rim portion and said dOWIliILlIIlBd rim portion of said tray comprising said interengageable parts.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 264,397 Woodward Sept. 12, 1882 858,969 French July 2, 1907 967,903 Haas Aug. 23, 1910 971,857 Lilly et a1 Oct. 4, 1910 1,671,013 Conners May 22, 1928 1,776,995 Cliff Sept. 30, 1930 2,024,960 Allerding Dec. 17, 1935 2,606,596 Ziv Aug. 12, 1952 2,619,152 Lane Nov. 25, 1952 2,666,999 Brandt Jan. 26, 1954

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US264397 *Nov 18, 1881Sep 12, 1882 Vestal w
US858969 *Sep 8, 1906Jul 2, 1907Albert Edward FrenchIroning-table.
US967903 *Dec 2, 1908Aug 23, 1910Joseph HaasFurniture.
US971857 *Sep 1, 1909Oct 4, 1910George E LillyIroning-board.
US1671013 *Aug 29, 1927May 22, 1928Frank & Son IncStool
US1776995 *Oct 31, 1927Sep 30, 1930Winifred Cliff KatePortable ironing board
US2024960 *Jun 5, 1933Dec 17, 1935Allerding Cletus NConvertible furniture
US2606596 *Nov 10, 1947Aug 12, 1952Ziv Seymour RChair having adjustable back rest, footrest, armrest, and tray
US2619152 *Aug 17, 1948Nov 25, 1952Stanley S LaneCombined stool, ladder, and high chair
US2666999 *Nov 17, 1950Jan 26, 1954Brandt Cornelius KExtensible iron stand
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2957514 *Jun 26, 1958Oct 25, 1960Lockwood William HConvertible article of furniture
US7025415 *Oct 21, 2004Apr 11, 2006Chieh-Ming WuMultifunctional chair
US7207623 *Jan 23, 2003Apr 24, 2007Jrt Joint-Stock CompanyItem of transformable furniture
US8720989 *Nov 2, 2006May 13, 2014Brian JurcicConvertible chair
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/122, 297/153, 297/411.27
International ClassificationA47B85/00, A47C13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47C13/00, A47B85/00
European ClassificationA47C13/00, A47B85/00