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Publication numberUS2889445 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 2, 1959
Filing dateMar 28, 1955
Priority dateMar 28, 1955
Publication numberUS 2889445 A, US 2889445A, US-A-2889445, US2889445 A, US2889445A
InventorsHerman B Wolf
Original AssigneeHerman B Wolf
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electrically heated mat
US 2889445 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 2, 1959 H. B. WOLF 2,839,445A

ELECTRICALLY HEATED MAT Filed March 28. 1955 HERMAN B. WOLF,

INVENTOR.

ATTORNEYS.

United States Patent O ELECTRICALLY HEATED MAT Herman B. Wolf, "Charlotte, N.C.

Application March 28, 1955, Serial No. 497,007

3 Claims. (Cl. 219--46) This invention generally relates to lloor coverings and, more especially, to an improved rug or carpet warming or heating mat or pad for disposition beneath the rug, carpet or the like for transmitting heat thereto.

Heretofore, various attempts have been made to develop a heating pad suitable for underlining oor coverings, such as rugs, carpets and the like, which would give even heating of the upper surface of the heating pad and a low temperature gradient between the heat source and the surface of the pad. However, all attempts in this direction have met with failure.

It is therefore the primary object of this invention to provide an improved heating pad or mat having a construction which results in even heating of the upper surface of the pad and a low temperature gradient between the heat source and the surface of the pad without sacrificing the desired resiliency and thinness of the pad. This construction also prevents localized hot spots under flat pieces of furniture or other ilat objects that might be placed on the heating pad since the heat conducting metal and material in the pad conduct the heat evenly throughout the pad.

It is another object of the invention to construct a heating pad wherein heat is conducted readily to the upper surface of the pad by a thin metal sheet positioned above and in contact with the heating conductors and through heat conducting material placed on each side of the electrical conducting means and in contact with the thin metal sheet thereabove.

It is also an object to prevent a downward dissipation of heat in the pad by placing a thin metal sheet in spaced relationship to the underside of the heat generating means to reect the heat upward to the top surface of the pad.

4It is a further object to provide a multi-ply heating pad or mat wherein the cement means for bonding together the various plies is a heat conducting cement which facilitates the obtaining of an even temperature on the upper surface of the mat.

This application is a continuation-in-part of application, Serial Number 397,906, which is now Patent Number 2,783,358.

Some of the objects of the invention having been stated, other objects will appear as the description proceeds, when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which- Figure l is a plan view of the improved electrically heated pad or mat showing a corner of the uppermost ply thereof rolled upon itself with others of the ply and portions of the coils of the heating element being broken away for purposes of clarity;

Figure 2 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical section through the improved pad or mat taken along line 2-2 of Figure l Figure 3 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical section through the improved pad or mat taken along line 3-3 in Figure 1 showing the manner in which the corner portions of the pad or mat are secured.

Referring more specifically to the drawings, the impaper, plastic, rubber or other resilient web material isv proved rug pad or mat is broadly designated at 10 and comprises a iirst outer or bottom cover or ply 11 formed from tough, glass reinforced paper, plastic, rubber or other resilient web material. Positioned upon the ply 11 is a thin layer or ply 12 of heat conducting metal such as aluminum foil. As is well known, foil is generally of substantially the same thickness as writing paper and the thickness thereof is proportionately exaggerated in Figure 2 for purposes of clarity.

Above the thin layer or ply 12 of heat conducting metal is placed a thin iibrous sheet or ply 13 which prevents a suitably insulated electrical conductive means or heating element 14 from engaging the metal ply 12.

Between the closely spaced parallel runs or coils of the electrical conductive means 14 is placed a high thermal conducting material or ply 15 in the form of saturated felt impregnated with asphalt, matted aluminum, steel wool or the like. t

An upper layer or ply 16 of heat conducting metal such as aluminum foil is in direct contact with the electrical conductive means 14 and the heat conducting material 15. It should be noted that the spaced parallel runs or coils of the conductive means 14 are in continuous uninternlpted contact with the metallic ply 16 to permit the ply to receive the maximum amount of heat by conduction. A resilient ply 17 formed from tough, glass reinforced positioned upon the conducting metal 16 to comprise the outer or top cover portion of the pad or mat 10.

All the plies in the entire assembly are cemented t0-r gether under heat and pressure by means of a high thermal conducting cement such Aas asphalt cement or asphalt cement to which metal powder, such as aluminum or.

bronze, has been added to increase the conductivity.

Asphalt cement is dark colored and substantially black,

and when the foil sheet 16 is coated with it to secure the sheet to the heating element 14 and the heat conducting material 15 between the parallel runs of the heating element 14, the foil sheet loses its reiiecting value and becomes a heat conducting sheet. However, the foil sheet n 12 is preferably secured to the iibrous ply 13 by the l asphalt cement at spaced areas to permit the foil sheet to maintain to a considerable degree its heat reflecting quality.

Around the edge of the mat 10 is placed a water proof sealing tape 20 which provides a trim edge and a means for firmly securing an attachment cord having leads 21, 22 by being wrapped therearound as shown at the lower corner portion of Figure 1. By securing the leads 21, 22 to the mat corner the spaced parallel runs of the electrical conducting means 14 are prevented from being pulled out of the mat or pad by any jerk or pull on the attachment cord.

Suitably insulated lead wires 21 and 22 are connected to opposite ends of the heating element 14 adjacent a corner portion of the mat or pad 10 and are provided with a suitable plug 23 which is adapted to be connected to a suitable source of electrical energy.

In operation the heat generated in the electrically insulated coiled conductive member 14 of the pad is transmitted in three directions as follows:

To the upper thin metal sheet 16 by conduction since the upper sheet is in contact with it; to the heat conducting material 15 on each side of the electrical conductive means 14 and thence to the upper thin metal sheet 16 which is in direct contact with conductive material 15; through the lower brous sheet 13 to the lower thin metal sheet 12 where a large portion of the heat is reflected upwardly and the remainder conducted downward to the floor or surface upon which the mat may be used.

Accordingly, it will be understood that heat generated in the conductive means 14 is conducted readily to the upper surface of the mat both through direct contact of the conductive means 14 with the upper thin metal sheet 16 and also to the upper metal sheet 16 through the heat conducting material 15 on each side of the electrical conducting means 14. This results in even heating of the upper surface of the mat or pad 10 and a low temperature gradient between the heat source and the surface of the mat. This construction also prevents localized hot spots under at pieces of furniture or other at objects as the heat conducting metal 16 and heat conducting material 15 conduct the heat evenly throughout the mat.

The employment of a heat conducting cement for bonding the various plies together aids in obtaining a uniformly heated upper pad surface.

It is thus seen that there is provided a novel floor covering, a preferred form of which may be in the nature of the rug mat or pad for disposition beneath the decorated oor covering and which is arranged to effectively accommodate and conceal both from sight and feel, electrical resistance means or heating element coils, and means for diffusing heat uniformly throughout the rug or mat without sacrificing the resiliency of the rug pad and, further, being so arranged and constructed as to effectively radiate the heat upwardly or away from the floor so that substantially all the heat is effectively utilized and not dissipated or conducted away by the floor.

It is also contemplated that the improved heating pad or mat construction may, in itself, constitute a suitable ooring covering and serve as a visible covering member.

In the drawings and specification there has been set forth a preferred embodiment of the invention and, although specic terms are employed, they are used in a generic and descriptive sense only, and not for purposes of limitation, the scope of the invention being dened in the claims.

I claim:

1. A heat radiating pad comprising a pair of spaced plies of non-metallic material, a heating element having spaced runs, a pair of metallic plies on the interior surfaces of said plies, said heating element arranged between said pair of metallic plies, one of said metallic plies being in continuous uninterrupted engagement with the surface of said heating element throughout its length, a ply of nonmetallic material separating said other metallic sheet from said heating element, high thermal conducting material 4 v positioned between said spaced runs, and heat conducting cement connecting all the plies together, said cement containing metallic powder to increase the conductivity of the cement.

2. A heat radiating pad comprising a pair of opposing resilient covers, a heating element having spaced runs arranged between said opposing covers, heat conducting material positioned between said spaced runs of said heating element, a sheet of heat conducting metal positioned on the inner surface of one of said covers and being in engagement with said heat conducting material positioned between the spaced runs and being in continuous uninterrupted engagement with one surace of said heating element, another sheet of heat conducting metal, a nonmetallic ply separating said latter sheet of metal from said heating element and confining the latter metal sheet between itself and one of said covers, a sealing tape covering all the edges of the pad, an attachment cord connected to said heating element and portions of said sealing tape irrily securing said attachment cord to an edge of the pa 3. A heat radiating pad comprising a pair of opposing covers, a heating element having spaced runs arranged between opposing covers, asphalt saturated felt heat conducting material position in direct contact with said heating element, and a sheet of heat conducting metal positioned on the inner surface of one of said covers and being in engagement with said asphalt saturated felt and said heating element.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNTTED STATES PATENTS 1,521,241 Hale Dec. 30, 1924 1,860,934 Malone May 31, 1932 2,057,124 Van Gessel et al Oct. 13, 1936 2,084,468 Wach s- June 22, 1937 2,138,217 Sutter Nov. 29, 1938 2,152,934 Trent Apr. 4, 1939 2,575,987 York et al Nov. 20, 1951 2,617,916 Neidnig Nov. l1, 1952 2,702,334 Kleist Feb. 15, 1955 2,737,571 Eisler Mar. 6, 1956 2,781,439 Lane Feb. 12, 1957 2,783,358 Wolf Feb. 26, 1957

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1521241 *Jun 3, 1920Dec 30, 1924Willis W HaleElectrical insulating medium
US1860934 *Mar 26, 1930May 31, 1932Julian Y MaloneElectric heater
US2057124 *May 2, 1934Oct 13, 1936Rca CorpIndirectly heated cathode for discharge tubes
US2084468 *Oct 4, 1935Jun 22, 1937Wach Edward FThermoradiant heating unit
US2138217 *Dec 24, 1935Nov 29, 1938Sutter Roser BElectrical heating system
US2152934 *Jun 21, 1934Apr 4, 1939Harold E TrentHeat transmitting surface
US2575987 *Aug 29, 1947Nov 20, 1951Rca CorpConducting rubber heating element
US2617916 *Nov 22, 1950Nov 11, 1952Richard J NeidnigHeating pad in a sleeve form
US2702334 *Jan 22, 1952Feb 15, 1955Dole Refrigerating CoPlate heater
US2737571 *Jul 29, 1953Mar 6, 1956Technograph Printed Circuits LElectric resistance heating device
US2781439 *Sep 2, 1953Feb 12, 1957Thomas D LaneUnderfoot foot warmer
US2783358 *Dec 14, 1953Feb 26, 1957Herman B WolfElectrically heated pad
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3043943 *Dec 24, 1959Jul 10, 1962Cornwall CorpFood warmer
US3084241 *Feb 8, 1961Apr 2, 1963Genevieve C CarronaElectrically heated garment
US3103219 *Jul 27, 1961Sep 10, 1963Chadner Richard TSleep inducing heating pad
US3139517 *Mar 29, 1962Jun 30, 1964De Verter Walton GeorgeElectric heating units
US3153140 *Sep 12, 1961Oct 13, 1964Electric Parts CorpRadiant heating panel
US3173419 *Jul 10, 1962Mar 16, 1965Edna G CottonRelaxer device
US3178561 *Jan 8, 1962Apr 13, 1965Herman B WolfHeating pad
US3393297 *Jan 14, 1966Jul 16, 1968Oliver M. HartCombined heating and insulating means for heat-treating objects
US3422244 *May 10, 1965Jan 14, 1969Peter LauckElectric blanket with a temperature responsive control circuit
US3427431 *Dec 13, 1966Feb 11, 1969Raphael Joseph CostanzoSleeping bag and heater therefor
US3564207 *Jul 24, 1969Feb 16, 1971Infra Red Systems IncElectric infrared heater
US4220848 *Oct 25, 1978Sep 2, 1980Mcmullan James PWater bed heater
US4310745 *Nov 26, 1979Jan 12, 1982Huebner Bros. Of Canada Ltd.Heating assemblies
US4321459 *Mar 7, 1980Mar 23, 1982Nichias CorporationElectrical heating molded-element comprising inorganic fibers
US4665308 *Nov 25, 1985May 12, 1987Lange International S.A.Electrical heating element intended to be incorporated in an inner lining of an item of clothing or accessory intended to be placed against a part of the human body
US5408068 *Apr 29, 1993Apr 18, 1995Ng; Wai-ManElectric heater for use in vehicle
US5605418 *Sep 20, 1993Feb 25, 1997Taisei Home Engineering Kabushiki KaishaRoad snow melting system using a surface heating element
US7329843Jun 19, 2003Feb 12, 2008Http-Hypothermia Therapy Ltd.Electrical heating device particularly for heating a patient body
US7709770 *Mar 28, 2001May 4, 2010HTTP—Hypothermia Therapy Ltd.Heating device for heating a patient's body
US9380649 *Apr 6, 2011Jun 28, 2016Nichias CorporationJacket heater and method for attaching same
US9538581Sep 7, 2012Jan 3, 2017417 and 7/8 LLCHeating unit for warming fluid conduits
US20040026409 *Mar 28, 2001Feb 12, 2004David BikhovskyHeating device for heating a patient's body
US20060206177 *Jun 19, 2003Sep 14, 2006David BikhovskyElectrical heating device particularyly for heating a patient body
US20090056244 *Sep 17, 2008Mar 5, 2009Flatwork Technologies, LlcGrounded modular heated cover
US20130062338 *Apr 6, 2011Mar 14, 2013Kenji IidaJacket heater and method for attaching same
EP2557894A4 *Apr 6, 2011Mar 16, 2016Nichias CorpJacket heater and method for attaching same
Classifications
U.S. Classification392/435, 338/212, 219/530, 219/549
International ClassificationH05B3/34
Cooperative ClassificationH05B2203/017, H05B2203/014, H05B3/342, H05B2203/003, H05B2203/032, H05B2203/026
European ClassificationH05B3/34B