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Publication numberUS2890496 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 16, 1959
Filing dateOct 8, 1956
Priority dateOct 8, 1956
Publication numberUS 2890496 A, US 2890496A, US-A-2890496, US2890496 A, US2890496A
InventorsWilliams Steele D
Original AssigneeWilliams Steele D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for making fiber mat
US 2890496 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 16, 1959 s. D. WILLIAMS APPARATUS FOR MAKING FIBER MAT 4 Sheets-Sheet l Filed Oct, 8, 1956 l 2 INKENTOR.

Steele D. Will/ams H/.IS` ATTORNEYS June 16, 1959 s. D. WILLIAMS APPARATUS FOR MAKING FIBER MAT Filed oct. s, 195e 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN1/ Ewan Steele 0 W//llams Hl` ATTORNEYS.

June 16, 1959 s. D. WILLIAMS APPARATUS RoR MAKING FIBER MAT 4 Sheets-Sheefl 3 Filed Oct. 8, 1956 1NV EN ToR. Slee/e Q Will/ams Bgm HIS A T TORNEYS June 16, 1959 s. D. WILLIAMS APPARATUS Foa MAKING FIBER MAT 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed oci. 8, 1956 56J g. .9 IN1/Hymn. Slee/e D. Will/ams Y BY H/S ATTORNEYS,

nited States Patent I APPARATUS FOR MAKING FIBER MAT lSteele D. Williams, Weston, W. Va.

Application October 8, 1956, Serial No. 614,581

9 Claims. (Cl. 19-155) This application is a continuation in part of the application Serial No. 531,948 filed September 1, 1955, and relating to Fiber Mat and Method of Making the Same. The invention here disclosed and defined relates to Vprocedure and apparatus for forming glass fiber mat. An

Aobject of such invention is to produce fiber mat continuously and in the form of a flexible strip having substantial tensile strength both longitudinally and transversely of the strip.

A further object is to produce procedure for forming a matted structure including in its make-up glass fibers of various lengths and extending at random in Various directions but in which such fibers are interwoven and -form a unitary structure of well defined shape which is flexible and in which substantially all the individual fibers included in the structure maintain their individual fiex- -ibility under normal conditions of use of the matted structure.

A further object is to produce effective and efficient apparatus for continuously producing a mat structure including in its make-up interwoven glass fibers of various vlengths Vand extending haphazardly in various directions,

but in which the mat constitutes a unitary structure of well defined shape and includesftwo opposed parallel substantially plane surfaces bounded by substantially straight edges which extend substantially parallel to each other.

In the apparatus illustrated and in the procedure defined for forming glass fiber mat, one or more suspended strip-like form in which'the individual fibers contained therein extend at random in various directions and to a vlarge extent retain vtheir individual flexibility, but are interwoven and interconnected in such a way as to constitute the principal elements of a continuous strip or band of well defined shape having two opposed-substantially plane surfaces located in parallel relationship and bounded by substantially straight `edges extending parallel to each other.

In carrying forward the procedure of my invention, I preferably employ means for delivering twoor more suspended streams of molten glass issuing from .delivery orifices which are submerged by hot and highly Amolten glass. While the glass of .each such stream is still in a highly molten state, yit is broken up into numerous fine fibersof various and indiscriminate lengths which are simultaneously projected into a laterally confined Vpassage so as to form therein a moving heterogeneous, ibut substantially `homogeneous `confined lmass of fibers .in which the fibers of the mass are located haphazardly yand other.

extend in different directions and are interwoven l-just sufficiently to cause different portions of 'the 1mass to at least loosely adhere to-each other. The bers received into the mass are cooled to their solidification temperatureandiare 'of such dimensions that they are-individually highly exible.

The confined mass of yfibers lis gradually compressed as the mass is moved forward and is compressed under conditions such .as to Aminimize Vfiber breakage and so=that the mass is finally formed into a structure of -interwoven and interconnected fibers extending at randomin various directions and in which the matted structure is of striplike form with opposed plane surfaces having straight bounding vedges extending substantially yparallel to each Prior to, duringor after compressing the fibers into final matted form, the fibers yare treated with ya liquid which coats them and forms `a temporary'b'inder yfor the fibers within the vmat structure and contributes to amore permanentbonding of `suchifibers in case a plastic material is applied to -the mat structure. 'The/binding liquid initially employed is such that it -wetsv the fibers, coats them and assures a bond between the coatediibers and a plastic material vwhere the mat structure is ernployed as a part of an end product which includes-a Aplastic as a constituent thereof.

In the drawings accompanying and forming a fpart hereof- Figure 1 is a fragmental plan `view of a mat forming machine embodying one aspect of my `invention and so formed and constructed that it is capable of carrying forward the procedure which forms the principal feature of my invention;

Figure 2 is a Ifragmental side elevation of the machine shown in Figure l;

Figure 3 is a fragmental sectional View of Iaportion of the mat making machine illustrated .in Figures 1 and `2, together with a plan `View of a mechanism for forming fiber glass and delivering same to the 4mat making machine;

Figure 4 is a side elevation of a portion ofthe apparatus shown in 'Figure 3;

yFigure 5 is a fragmental ydiagrammatic/viewof means employed in connection with mechanism shown AiniFigure 3 for delivering molten glass to such `mechanism and shown in connection with the sectional viewf-ofthemechanism illustrated vin Figure 4;

Figure is a sectional view -of apparatus such as is shown in Figure 2 in which portions thereof lare shown inverted for convenience of operation;

`Figure 7 v'is a sectional View along the line yVlI---VII of Figure 6;

Figure -8 is a fragmental sectional view of la portion of the operating apparatus; and

Figure 9 is an enlarged sectional view taken -along `the line IX--IX of Figure 2.

In VFigure 3 I have shown in section a portion .of a converging passage 36 into which the glass fibers V`are projected at a rate which substantially fills the delivery end of thepassage with a mass of such fibers. The fibers are formed by means of apparatus illustrated in Figures 3, 4 and 5 of the drawings and which Will be 'later described. The passage 36 is located and arranged to -deliver vthe fibers received by it to a mat forming machine such as shown in Figures 1 and 2. The converging 'end of the passage 86 communicates with the receiving end of the mat forming machine andas noted, fibers -are delivered to the passage 36 at a rate and under conditions such as to keep the delivery end of the passage lled with a mass of such fibers as `the forward portion of `the mass moves into the mat forming machine.

The massof vfibersinitially formed in the receiving end of the :passage A36 is .loosely integrated. As ,the 1112185 Patented June 1 6, 1959 y members which converge from the` receiving end of the machine to the delivery end thereof and which are so located as to receive the interwoven mass of bers issuing from the passage 36. The machine gradually and gently compresses the mass of bers so received to final mat form.

One of the two movable elements included in the machine is illustrated in Figure 2 as a rack which includes a plurality of bars 47 mounted on a plate 48. The bars extend parallel to each otherin the direction of the movement imparted to the fiber mass by the cooperation of the two movable members. The edge of each bar 47 which contacts the mass of fibers is shown as provided with a corrugated surface 47a, so formed that the peaks of the corrugations are well rounded and the valleys are shallow so that each bar presents an undulating surface to the mass of fibers entering and located within the mat forming machine. In addition, the corrugated surfaces of the rack bars are so formed and the bars so located on their mounting plate 48 that the peaks of the corrugations of adjacent bars are aligned transversely of the bars.

The other movable element of the mat forming machine is illustrated as an endless belt 49 located between and surrounding spaced pulleys StL-50. The pulleys are so positioned relatively to each other that the belt is held taut between them. As shown in Figure 2, the bars 47 project upwardly through parallel slots formed in a base plate 51 which in fact forms the bottom of a converging passage located between it and the lower reach of the belt 49. The belt and the plate S1 are so positioned relatively to each other that the receiving end of the converging passage between them in effect forms a continuation of the converging top and bottom walls of the passage 36. The rack bars 47 and the belt 49 are arranged to move in unison with each other so that as the bars move upwardly and forwardly (to the left in Figure 2), the lower reach of the belt also moves forwardly. As shown in Figures 1 and 2, the mat forming machine is supported on four uprights 52 which are arranged to provide corner supports for a frame which includes two end members 53a and two side members 53h. The plate 51 is shown as located between and secured to the uprights 52 and extending lengthwise of the machine.

As disclosed in Figure 2, the rack bars and the rack plate are actuated by a motor 54 through the medium of a speed reducing mechanism 55 which is operatively coupled to a shaft S6 by a sprocket and chain connection. The shaft 56 constitutes the operating shaft of the mat producing machine and extends transversely of the plate 48 and the rack bars 47. It is journaled in bearings which, in the machine illustrated, may be mounted on the two uprights 52 located at the receiving end of the machine. A shaft 56a similar to the shaft 56 and extending parallel thereto is supported in suitable journals which, as shown, may be mounted on the uprights 52 located at the delivery end of the machine. A separate eccentric 57 is secured to each of the shafts 56 and 56a. These eccentrics are operatively connected by a connecting rod 58 so that the two shafts 56 and 56a operate together and in phase with each other (see Figures 2 and 8).

It is noted that the now preferred embodiment of the machine is illustrated in Figures 6 and 7 of the drawings. As there shown, the rack bars 47 and their mounting plate 48 are located above the continuous belt 49.

The reason for this is thatduring the operation of the 4 machine as shown in Figures 1 and 2, siftings tended to plug the slots in the base plate 51 through which the rack bars 47 project. With the inverted arrangement, the upper reach of the belt 49 forms a support for the mass of glass fibers moving through the machine and with this arrangement objectionable sifting is avoided. Reference is made to Figures 6 and 7 in the further description of the invention, since except for the reversal of the part noted, the structure is substantially the same as that disclosed in said application Serial No. 531,948.

As indicated in Figures 6 and 7, the shaft 56 is provided with two eccentric rings 59 which in the original disclosure are located between the supports 52, one such ring being located adjacent one such support and the other adjacent the oppositely located support. The rings are secured to the shaft 56 so that they are located eccentrically thereof, and similar rings are located on and secured in corresponding positions to the shaft 56a (Figure 6). A separate slip ring 60 surrounds and is journaled on the external surface of each of the rings 59. The rings 60 are rigidly secured to a bar 61, shown in Figure 7 as a channel member which extends transversely across the rack plate 48 and is secured thereto. A similar bar 61a is rigidly secured to the slip rings 60 carried by the eccentric rings 59 secured to the shaft 56a (see Figure 6). The two bars 61 and 61a extend in parallel relationship and each is operatively secured to the plate 48. As a result, rotation of the shafts 56 and 56a imparts reciprocating motion to the plate 48 and the rack bars 47. This motion contributes to the compression of the relatively loose fiber mass delivered to the machine and contributes to the forward movement and the further compression of the fiber mass.

lIn Figure 8 I have diagrammatically illustrated the positions occupied by the eccentrics 59 and consequently by the slip rings 60 as the shaft 56 rotates. The four positions illustrated make it apparent that the attached bar 61 rises and falls during the rotation of the shaft and also moves forward and back as the eccentric actuated rings 60 complete a cycle. It is therefore apparent that the two shafts 56 and 56a move together and through exactly similar cycles and that during each such cycle raise and then lower the rack plate 48 and consequently the rack bars 47 secured to the plate. Figure 8 also makes it apparent that as the plate 48 is .moved upwardly it first moves rearwardly and then forwardly (to the left in Figure 8) and as the plate moves downwardly it continues its forward movement, but before reaching the bottom of its stroke moves rearwardly and is so moving at the bottom of the stroke.

A reference to the diagram in Figure 8 discloses the relative position of the rack bars 47 as the eccentric rings move through four points of a complete cycle. In the diagram I have illustrated in full lines one of the eccentric rings 59 and its associated slip ring in the highest position, i.e., the position in which the rack plate 48 and the bars 47 are raised to their highest position. This position of the rings and the bars is designated in Figure 8 as the #l position. The arrow associated with the sectional View of the shaft 56 designates the direction of rotation of the shaft and consequently indicates that the eccentric ring 59 moves to the left in Figure 8 in passing from the #l to the #2 position. During this movement, the rack bars 47 continue their forward movement as they start their downward movement. As the eccentric rings move from the #2 position to the #3 position, the plate 48 and bars 47 are moved to their lowermost position and during this movement they also move rearwardly (to the right in Figure 8). This rearward motion of the plate 48 and bars 47 continues as the eccentric rings move from the #3 to the #4 position. During this portion of the cycle, the plate 48 and the rings 47 start their upward movement. In moving from #4 to #l positiom sconce the eccentric rings move the plate 48 and rack bars 47 forward and to their highest position.

'Ille diagram of ligure 8 also discloses that during each cycle of the eccentric rings 59 the rack bars are firs/t fully withdrawn from the space between the plate 51 and the lower reach of the belt 49, but during the major portion 'of withdrawal they are also moving forwardly. As the peaks of the corrugated surfaces of the bars 47 are moving out of the space between plate 51 and belt 49, the bars are moving rearwardly. This rearward motion continues until the peaks of the corrugated surfaces project through slots in the plate 51. However, the bars 47 are moving rearwardly throughout the major portion of their movement during the period that the corrugated surfaces are below the base plate 51.

As a result of the movement of the rack bars positioned as shown in Figures 1, 2 and 8, it is apparent that these bars perform a double function in that they aid in propelling the mass of bers forwardly and also gradually compress the mass into mat formation. That is to say, the ber mass issuing from the passage 36 and entering the space between the upper reach of the belt 49 and the plate 51, is propelled forwardly and at the same time is compressed into mat formation by reason of the fact that the rack bars converge toward the belt 49 and also because as the rack bars are raised to their highest position, their left handends (Figure 2) are located immediately adjacent the lower reach of the belt 49 and therefore exert the final mat forming pressure on the fiber mass as they and the lower reach of the belt move forwardly.

In the illustrated embodiment of the invention, the belt pulleys 50 and 51 are so driven that the belt moves periodically so that the lower reach thereof as shown in Figures 2 and 8, moves forwardly as the rack bars move forwardly. In order to accomplish this, I provide means actuated by the shaft 56 for advancing the lower reach of the belt in a step by step movement and so that each such movement takes place as the rack bars move upwardly and forwardly as shown in Figures 2 and 8. The shaft 56 is provided near one end with a crank 62 which carries a roller cam 62a. This cam engages and actuates a rocker bar 63 (Figure 2). The rocker bar 63 is fulcrumed on a pin `63a carried by a side member 53b of the frame of the machine and actuates a shaft 64 through the agency of a pawl 63b and ratchet wheel 64a. The Iwheel 64a is mounted on the shaft 64. The pulley 50 is mounted on the shaft 64. The pawl 63b is pivotally connected to the upper end of the bar 63 and as sho-wn in Figure 2 of the drawings is so located that it engages and actuates the wheel 64a as the bar moves back and forth about its fulcrum pin 63a in response to the operation of the roller cam 62a.

As shown in Figure 2, the movement of the bar 63 in one direction is limited by an adjustable stop 66 carried by a bracket mounted on one of the side members 53b of the frame. The movement toward the stop 66 of the portion of the bar 63 above the fulcrum pin 63a is impelled by a spring 65 which is shown in Figure 2 as acting between the upper end of the rocker bar and a `pin carried bythe side member 53b. The cam roller 62a engages the lower end of the rocker bar during each rotation of the shaft 56 and turns the bar about its fulcrum pin in opposition to the pull of spring 65. Thus, the cam roller moves the pawl to advance the ratchet wheel through a portion of a revolution during each revolution ofthe shaft 56, consequently the pulley 50 moves through a portion of a revolution and the lower reach of the belt 49 a short distance during each such revolution.

The position of the crank arm 62 on the shaft 56 is such that the lower reach of belt 49 moves forwardly as the -rack bars 47 move upwardly and forwardly. The position of the stop 66 is so adjusted that the pawl 63b engages a ratchet of the wheel 64a each time the bar 63 is -actuated yby the cam roller 62a`and, therefore, advances the lower reach of the belt 49 in a step by step movement,

the arrangement being such that the belt and the rack bars 47 cooperate in imparting forward movement to the portion of the iiber mass located between the lower reach of the belt and the base plate 51. In Figure 2 I have illustrated the completed mat in the form of a continuous strip which is designated -by the numeral 67.

From the foregoing it will be apparent that the procedure here defined involves the projection of libers of indiscriminate length and form into a coniining passage so as to form a loosely consolidated heterogeneous mass, but at the same time a substantially uniform mass of fibers which in moving or being moved through the conning passage are partially compressed and then delivered to a passageway located between -two moving parts of lthe mat forming machine. As previously described, the moving parts involve a periodically moving belt and a vcyclically moving rack plate 48 which is provided with a plurality of parallel rack bars 47.

The operation of the machine is such that the ber mass delivered to it is moved forwardly in a step by step movement and at the same time is gently compressed so as to combine the mass of fibers into a consolidated mass which is eventually delivered from the machine in the form of a continuous strip having opposed parallel plane faces which are bounded by spaced edges which extend substantially parallel to each other.

During the forward movement of the fiber mass it is wetted by a binder liquid of such form `and consistency that it wets and adheres to the individual fibers of the mass and functions as a binding agent in holding the fibers in iixed positions relatively to each other. As previously noted, the binding liquid 'is such as to form a permanent bond between the individual fibers and a plastic material where such a material is employed in the formation of the mat structure.

Various means may be employed for forming the glass bers going into the make-up of the mat structure and for projecting the r'ibers as formed into a confining passage- Way. As illustrated in Figures 3, 4 and 5, one or more streams of molten glass issue from orices located in the bottom of a forehearth or other container which includes highly molten glass above the orillce. As indicated `in Figure 3, the apparatus illustrated functions in connection with two such streams 29b of molten glass in the formation of ibers of indiscriminate size and shape. As shown in Figure 3 and as described in the above mentioned parent application, each of the pipes 32 illustrated in lthe drawings communicates with a source of high pressure superlreated steam through a llexible connection 32a. Each pipe 32 is so associated with one of the streams 29h that it oscillates While delivering an expanding jet of steam to, and through lthe stream of molten glass and oscillates in such a way that the jet of steam issuing is always in contact with the stream of molten glass.

In Figure 5 the nozzle 33 forming a part of one of the pipes 32, is shown projecting through an L-shaped bracket 37, one leg of which is pivotally connected to a support by means of a pivot bolt 38. The fulcrum point about which the bracket 37 pivots is in the axial 'line of ow of the associated stream of molten glass 29h. The oscillating means for each pipe 32 is such that the center of oscillation of each pipe is located in the axis of flow of one or the other of the streams 2911. The actuating ,mechanism for both pipes includes a motor 39 operatively coupled to a speed change gear 40 provided with a y wheel or rotating disc 40a. The disc is provided with an eccentric pin 40h which is -operatively connected to a pitman rod 41. The rod 41 is pivotally connected to a connecting rod 42 which reciprocates in a cross head guide 43 and functions as a cross head in that it actuates Vtwo bell cranks 44. Eachbell crank-is pivotally mounted on a separate fulcrum pin 45 and its free arm is pivotally ,secured to a link 46. Each link is in turn operatively coupled to one of the steam delivery pipes 32 so that during the lrotation yof the disc .40a the `tWO Pipes 32 Aare wheel 64a.

moved in opposite directions, each pipe being moved away from and then toward the axis of the cross head `guide43 so that it oscillates about the axial ow line of the suspended glass stream with which the pipe is associated.

In this way each stream of molten glass is broken up into separate fibers and the fibers so formed are projected at a relatively high velocity and at a high temperature into the receiving end of the confining passageway 36.

As previously noted, the now preferred arrangement of the operating parts of the mat forming machine is shown in Figures 6 and 7. In Figure 6 the endless belt 49 extends around the belt supporting pulleys 50a and 50b, each of which is mounted on one of the shafts 64. The so-called base plate 51 shown in Figure 2 is replaced by the upper reach of the belt 49', and a plate 51 is located above the belt and is so arranged with side panels 51a that it provides, with the belt, a converging passageway from the inlet end to the delivery end of the machine proper. The rack plate 48 is located above the plate 51 and the rack bars 47 secured thereto, project through parallel apertures 51b formed in the plate 51'. With such an arrangement the actuating mechanism of the rack plate 48 is located above that plate and consists of the shafts 56 and 56a which are operatively connected together by means of crank arms 57 and a connecting rod 58 and each of which is provided with an eccentric ring 59. Each ring supports a slip ring 60 which is welded to or otherwise operatively secured to a channel bar located above and secured to the rack plate 48. One ring 60 is shown secured to the bar 61 and the other ring is shown secured to the bar 61a. The two channel bars 6l and 61a extend in spaced, parallel relation to each other and each is secured to the rack plate 48. The shaft 56 is driven by apparatus such as illustrated in Figure 2, i.e., by a motor 54, a reducing mechanism 55 and Aa chain and sprocket mechanism, the sprocket 56' being mounted on the shaft 56.

The belt supporting pulleys 50a and 50b as shown in Figures 6 and 7 are so driven that the belt 49 moves periodically in such a way that the upper reach thereof moves forwardly as the rack bars 47 move `downwardly and forwardly. The operating mechanism for the shaft 64 on which the pulley 50a is mounted, is similar to that illustrated in Figures 2 and 9 of the drawings and includes a crank 62 which carries a roller cam 62a. The crank 62 is mounted on the shaft 56 and the cam 62a engages `and actuates a rocker bar 63 fulcrumed on a pin 63a. The rocker bar is similar to the bar 63 of Figure 2 and actuates the shaft 64 on which the pulley 50a is mounted, through the agency of a pawl 6317 and ratchet The wheel 64a is mounted on `the shaft 64 and the pawl 63h is pivotally connected to the upper end of the rocker bar 63 and is so located that it engages and actuates the ratchet wheel 64a as the bar moves back and forth about its fulcrum point in response to the operation of the roller cam 62a. In other words, while the operating parts shown in Figures 6 and 7 occupy relative positions the reverse of those shown in Figures 2 and 9, the operating devices therefor are in many respects the same as those illustrated in Figures 2 and 9 and are designated by the same reference characters.

While I have described but two embodiments of the invention, one of which is illustrated and described in the parent application, it will be apparent that changes, additions, omissions and modifications may be made in the apparatus illustrated without departing from the spirit and scope of my invention.

What I claim is:

l. A machine for compressing a mass of fibers into mat formation, including in combination an elongated base plate; an elongated top member located above and extending along said plate and located in converging relationship therewith; a rack plate located below said base plate and movable toward and from said base plate; rack rack plate toward and away from said base plate and said bars into and out of the space between said base plate and said top member.

2. In a machine for compressing a mass of glass fibers into mat formation, an elongated top member; an elongated base plate located below said member extending longitudinaly therealong and converging toward said member; a rack plate located below and movable toward and away from said base plate; parallel rack bars mounted on said rack plate each extending longitudinally thereof and each movable through a separate elongated slot formed in said base plate and into and out of the space between said base plate and said member; and means for periodically moving said rack plate toward and away from said base plate and simultaneously in first one direction and then the other longitudinally of said base plate.

3. A machine for compressing a mass of glass fibers into strip formation, comprising in combination a longitudinally extending top member; an elongated base plate located beneath and extending longitudinally of, and in converging relationship to said member; a rack plate movable toward and away from said base plate and for- Vward and back longitudinally thereof; a plurality of rack bars mounted in parallel relationship on said rack plate,

'each such bar movable into and out of the space between said member and said base plate through an elongated slot formed in said base plate 4and extending longitudinally thereof; means for periodically moving said rack plate toward andraway from and forward and back longitudinally thereof to thereby cause said bars to move into and out of the space between said member and said base plate and to simultaneously move first in one direction and then in the other longitudinally of said base plate; means for moving said member longitudinally of said base plate as said bars move within the space between said member and said base plate; and means for deliverving a mass of glass fibers into the space between said base plate and said member.

4. In Ia machine for compressing a mass of fibers into strip formation including a longitudinally extending top member and a longitudinally extending base plate located beneath said member and extending along said member in converging relationship thereto; means for delivering a mass of fibers into the larger end of the converging passage between said member and said plate; means including a plurality of parallel rack bars for compressing the mass of fibers within such passage and for moving such mass toward and through the converging end of such passage; means for moving said rack bars toward and away from said member and simultaneously rst in one direction and then the other longitudinally of said plate and said member; and means for periodically moving said member longitudinally and toward the converging end of said passage.

5. A machine for compressing a mass of fibrous material into mat formation, including an elongated stationary plate; an elongated movable member extending along said plate and located in converging relationship thereto and forming therewith a converging open-ended passage; a rack plate extending along and located adjacent to said stationary plate on the side thereof remote from said passage; rack bars mounted on said rack plate and extending in parallel relationship longitudinally thereof and each movable into and out of said passage through a separate longitudinally extending slot formed in said stationary plate; and means for periodically moving said rack plate toward and away from said stationary plate and said bars into and out of said passage.

6. A machine for compressing a mass of fibrous material into mat formation, including an elongated member;

an elongated stationary plate extending longitudinally of and converging toward said member and forming therewith an open-ended, converging passage; a rack plate extending along and located adjacent to said stationary plate on the side thereof remote from said passage; parallel rack bars mounted on said rack plate each extending longitudinally thereof and each movable into and out of said passage through a separate elongated slot formed in said stationary plate; means for periodically moving said rack plate toward and away from said base plate and simultaneously in one direction and then the other longitudinally of said -base plate; and means for moving said member longitudinally of said stationary plate and toward the small end of said converging passage.

7. A machine as defined in claim 6 in which the free, longitudinal edge of each of said bars is corrugated.

8. A machine for compressing a mass of glass ber into strip formation including Ian elongated stationary plate; a movable member extending longitudinally of said plate and in converging relationship thereto and forming therewith an open-ended converging passage; a rack plate adjacent said stationary plate on the side thereof remote from said passage and movable toward and from said stationary plate and simultaneously forward and back longitudinally thereof; a plurality of parallel, spaced rack bars mounted on said rack plate, each movable into and out of said passage through a separate elongated slot formed in said stationary plate and extending longitudinally thereof; means for periodically moving said rack plate toward and away from and simultaneously forward and back longitudinally of said stationary plate to thereby move said bars into and out of said passage; means for moving said member longitudinally of said stationary plate and toward the small end of said passage as said bars move into said passage; and means for delivering glass bers into the large end of said passage.

9. A machine for compressing a mass of brous material into strip formation, comprising in combination an elongated, longitudinally extending, movable member; a stationary plate spaced from` and extending longitudinally of said member in converging relationship thereto and forming therewith a converging, open-ended passage; a rack plate adjacent said stationary plate on the side thereof remote from said passa-ge; spaced, parallel rack bars mounted side by side on, and extending longitudinally of said rack plate and each movable into and out of said passage through a separate elongated slot formed in said stationary plate; means for periodically moving said rack plate toward and away from said stationary plate and simultaneously longitudinally `thereof to cause said bars to move into and out of said passage and in one direction and then the other relatively to said stationary plate; means for moving said member longitudinally of said stationary plate and in a direction toward the small open end of said converging passage; and means for delivering fibrous material into the large open end of said passage.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,638,981 Columbro Aug. 16, 1927 1,834,309 Harney Dec. l, 1931 2,113,514 Molins Apr. 5, 1938 2,155,875 Stemper Apr. 25, 1939 2,281,860 Renault May 5, 1942 2,571,334 Browne Oct. 16, 1951 2,635,301 Schubert et a1. Apr. 21, 1953

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1638981 *Mar 20, 1926Aug 16, 1927Angelo ColumbroContinuous press
US1834309 *Feb 8, 1930Dec 1, 1931Upson CoMachine for making insulating bats
US2113514 *Jun 3, 1937Apr 5, 1938Molins Machine Co LtdTobacco feeding apparatus
US2155875 *Mar 25, 1936Apr 25, 1939Murray CorpMethod of preparing padding for inner trim panels
US2281860 *May 27, 1939May 5, 1942Renault Jean CContinuous feed and pressure press
US2571334 *Aug 30, 1946Oct 16, 1951Houdaille Hershey CorpMethod of making resilient batts
US2635301 *Sep 30, 1948Apr 21, 1953Plywood Res FoundationWeb or mat forming device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2974394 *Nov 22, 1957Mar 14, 1961Walton Richard RMachine for processing fibrous materials
US3506521 *Jan 17, 1966Apr 14, 1970Niederrheinsche Mas Fab BeckerPress for chip panels having a plurality of steps along the wedge edge of the press
US4896476 *Sep 16, 1988Jan 30, 1990Owens-Corning Fiberglas CorporationApparatus for packaging insulation material
Classifications
U.S. Classification28/139, 100/154, 19/81
International ClassificationD04H1/70, D04H1/72
Cooperative ClassificationD04H1/72
European ClassificationD04H1/72