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Publication numberUS2890497 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 16, 1959
Filing dateMar 10, 1954
Priority dateMar 10, 1954
Also published asDE1105317B, DE1159317B
Publication numberUS 2890497 A, US 2890497A, US-A-2890497, US2890497 A, US2890497A
InventorsBuresh Francis M, Castor Richard R, Langdon Howard H, Marks Robert E
Original AssigneeCurlator Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Machine for forming random fiber webs
US 2890497 A
Abstract  available in
Images(9)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 16, 1959 H. H. LANGDON ET AL 2,890,497

MACHINE FOR FORMING RANDOM FIBER WEBS Filed March 10. 1954 9 Sheets-Sheet 1 NWN Nvm

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arramver Z June 16, 1959 H. H. LANGDON T AL 2,890,497

MACHINE FOR FORMING RANDOM FIBER WEBS Filed March 10, 1954 9 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN VEN TORJ' HOWARD/i LANGDON, FRANCISMBURESl-l, mam/v0 n2 aggro/nun Ross/m5 MAR/(S I A TTORNEY June 16, 1959 H. H. LANGDON. ETAL 2,890,497

MACHINEFOR FORMINGRANDOM FIBER WEBS 9 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed March 10. 1954 Fli mmw I N V EN TOR; N615 M. BU ESH HPWARDH L BNGDON FRA RICHARD R. CASTORAK/fl ROBERT E MARKS ATTORNEY June 16, 1959 H. H. LANGDON E AL MACHINE FOR FORMING RANDOM FIBER WEBS 9 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed March 10. 1954 IN V EN T 0R3. FRAlVG/S M BURESH NGDOIV. 1%%1%% flsron ROBERTEMARKS' AND ATTORNEY 'l June 16, 1959 H, LANGDON ETAL 2,890,497

MACHINE FOR FORMING RANDOM FIBER WEBS Filed March 10. 1954 9 Sheets-Sheet 6 HOWARDHLAN lvFmfi s z fiEsn RIOHARDRCg; 4i; ROBERT .MARKS" ATTOHNEY Y June 16, 1959 H. H. LANGDON ETAL MACHINE FOR FORMING RANDOM FIBER WEBS 9 Sheets-Sheet 7 Filed March 10. 1954 NM k HOMIRD H LANGDON RICHARD R. 65

nrromsr filly June 16, 1959 H. H- LANGDON T 2,890,497

' MACHINE FOR FORMING RANDOM FIBER WEBS Filed March 10. 1954 I 9. Sheets-Sheet s HOWARD H LAN DON H6114 mam/mac ATTORNEY June 16, 1959' H. H. LAN DQN ETAL 2,890,497

MACHINE FOR FORMING RANDOM FIBER WEBS Filed March 10. 1954 9 Sheets-Sheet 9 I INVEN 01%. HOWARD]! LAN DOMFRANG/Sdgfil/ ESl-I Arr omm" i 2,890,497 Patented June 16, 1959 MA'CHINE FOR FORMING RANDOM FIBER WEBS Howard H. Langdon, Rochester, Francis M. Buresh, Brighton, Richard R. Castor, Fairport, and Robert E. Marks, Rochester, N .Y., assignors to Curlator Corporation, East Rochester, N.Y., a corporation of Delaware Application March 10, 1954, Serial No. 415,206

12 Claims. (Cl. 19156) The present invention relates to machines for forming random textile fibre webs and to feeding mechanisms for handling fibrous material, and particularly to a feeding mechanism suitable for use in feeding fibrous material to machines for forming random fibre webs. In a still more specific aspect the invention relates to an organized machine of the type disclosed in the pending patent applications of Francis M. Buresh and Howard H. Langdon, Serial Nos. 26,256 and 138,504, filed May 11, 1948, and January 13, 1950, respectively, now U.S. Patents 2,700,188 and 2,744,794, which is provided with a hopper into which stock material is dumped, means for pulling out and separating the stock material into small tufts that can be air-borne, means for creating an air stream to carry these tufts to a feeder where they are formed into a mat of substantially uniform thickness across its width, means for actuating the feeder to feed this mat to a lickerin, means for rotating the lickerin to pull fibres out of the mat, means for creating an air' stream to doif fibres from the lickerin and to carry those fibres to a moving foraminous condenser through which the air passes and upon which the fibres are deposited in ramdom fashion to form a random fibre web, and with a web roll which is mounted adjacent the condenser and under which the web passes as it is formed.

One difliculty with machines of the character described as heretofore built has been the problem of securing uniform deposit of the fibres over the full width of the condenser in order to obtain uniform-thickness of the deposited random fibre web across its whole width. Another difliculty has been that in previous machines the web roll was driven by friction of the web itself. On thick webs this caused surface irregularity. Another difficulty with prior machines of the type described has been the catching of dust or greasy fibres in the air duct or between the dotfing bar and the side walls of the air duct on which other fibres build up until a rope of fibres is formed which is finally broken by the force of the air stream and carried to the condenser forming a blemish in the web. This building up of a rope of fibres and forming of blemishes repeat until the machine is cleaned. Still another difliculty with random fibre web machines of previous constructions has been that the condenser has been driven at one end only. The undriven end in practice eventually becomes fibre or dirt bound; and as a consequence the condenser screen is twisted and the condenser destroyed.

One object of the invention is to provide a machine for forming random fibre webs which will produce a web of uniform thickness from edge to edge.

Another object of the invention is to provide a machine producing a Web with an improved surface finish.

Another object of the invention is to provide a machine of the character described which will have an improved condenser, one which can readily be cleaned, and one which will not twist out of shape.

Another object of the invention is to provide a feed mechanism for random fibre web machines and for cardweb roll drive;

ing, picking, garnetting, and other types of textile machines which will feed fibrous material into a machine at an even rate and uniformly across the width of the operating section of the machine.

Another object of the invention is to provide a more efiicient feed mechanism that can be constructed at a lower cost.

Another object of the invention is to provide a feed mechanism that may be used in blending lines where large hopper capacity is particularly desirable,

Another object of the invention is to provide a feed mechanism for fibrous material which will operate to open up the fibres and separate the trash therefrom.

Another object of the invention is to provide a feed mechanism which will open up the fibres more gently and yet quite thoroughly.

Other objects of the invention will be apparent hereinonganized machine for forming random fibre webs built according to one embodiment of this invention and provided with a feeder mechanism built according to one embodiment of this invention;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary vertical section on an enlarged scale through the left hand end of the webbing portion of the machine, and showing one of the partitions and the cooperating adjustable venturi device of the air duct, and the means for adjusting the venturi device to control the speed of air flow in the corresponding section of the air duct;

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary horizontal section taken approximately on the line 3--3 of Fig. 2 looking in the direction of the arrows, and showing the partitioned formation of the air duct and illustrating how through adjustment of the venturi devices, the velocity of the air stream at different points across the width of the air duct can be varied, thereby to control the thickness of the random fibre web produced in the machine across the whole width of the web.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary vertical section on an enlarged scale showing the lickerin, the condenser, the dofiin-g bar and its support, and cooperating parts including part of the removable saber;

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary plan view of the saber;

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary broken-away view showing one end of the doffing bar and its mounting, and showing the means for rotating the same;

Fig. 7 is a vertical section on an enlarged scale showing the condenser of the machine;

Fig. 10 is a fragmentary section taken on the line 10'10 of Fig. 9 looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 11 is a side elevation of one of the two side plates which support the dofiing bar and the duct cover;

Fig. 12 is a fragmentary vertical longitudinal section on an enlarged scale through the hopper and showing a portion of the feed mechanism including the condenser roll of the feed box;

Fig. 13 is a fragmentary side elevation on an enlarged scale showing the drive to the lower conveyer belt or apron of the feed mechanism;

Fig. 14 is a fragmentary vertical longitudinal section through the hopper and showing further details of the construction of the feed mechanism; and I Fig. 15 is a somewhat diagrammatic longitudinal ver- L tical section through the webbing portion of a machine as oh 3 built according to a somewhat different embodiment of thinfififiim a Referring now to the drawings by numerals of reference, and first to the embodiment of the invention shown in Figsfl to 15 inclusive, 20. denotes the feed section and 21 the Webbing section ofa machine built according to one'embodiment of this invention.

The feed section comprises a fabricated hopper 25 that is or otherwise fastened to the fabricated webbing section 21 and that is'supported upon rollers 22 (Figs. 1 and 14) that roll upon guide rails 23. The hopper 25 has an openingor mouth at2'6 into which the textile or o ther s'tock material, which is to be used in the hhs is h h d in the base of the hopper. 25. is an endless floor apron or conveyor belt 27 on which are secured a plurhlity elf PIf reblywoodens1ats 28. This conveyor belt is mounted tov travel over. pulleys 29.. and 3Qwhich are journaled' in the' frame of the hopper. The upper reach of this floor apron or conveyor belt is guided and supported horizontal angle iro'ns 32 of which only one is shown, which are bolted 'by means of bolts 33 (Fig. 14) to opposite sides of the hopper 25 The slats 28 have their tops slanted as denoted at 34 so that these bars are of greater height at their front ends, that is, in the, direction of travel of the belt, than at their rear ends.

The floor spa ie conveyor 27 carries, the stock material from adjacent opening 26 to an elevating apron or conveyor (1}) (Figs 1, 12 and 14) which is mounted to trayel over, pulleys 41 and 42. This apron is provided witha plurality of straps 44 which are embedded pins 45 These pins are inclined in the direction of travel of the, belt; The belt 40. is inolined upwardly and. its forward reach is supported along a portion of its length by angle irons 46, of which one is shown, which are. bolted by b ts 1 o the i hsq the p The pins, 4 piclc up bunches of the stock material, ith h'c r h f e e at n hhh fl r 27; and they can thesebunches upwardly toward the. top. of the hopper as the belt 40 travels upwardly.

Mpunted' in the upper portion of the hopper to co.- operate, with the elevating apron 40 is astripping apron Q; (B a 1 and; 2).- ih s 21951. he ehshs s. halt. which travels over three pulleys 5 1 '52 and 53 which causethe, stripping apron to travel in a generally. trin u ar. pat 9 ha 1Q h m h ss h ex t h w ht. he upper limit. o r r h t hP hh hd, then diverges from that apron. The stripping. apron carries a plurality of straps 54 in. which. are embedded pins 55.; The pins 55 extend outwardly substantially perp nd c r to pt h- The purpose of the stripping apron is. to, reduce the tufts of material, which are carried upwardly by thepins 45 of the elevating apron, to a size suitable for. use in the. manufacture of the, random fibre web, and. second to re move excess material from the elevating, apron, and. to move this material totheloading endofthe hopper 2 5 Thestripping apron removes excessive fibre from thepins 45 of the elevating apron 40, leaving only small-bunches 6'3; The, headfeh of the arm, 63 .is keyed a e outer member of ac'onvent io nal one way, which; drives e het R'= 1 .P: F h yhl t of h ha 8 T efqhhh stih e ween e; link? e rh z; the arm 63 is justabl o, qhtwh hh enthii;53% nc f eflqor: p on. 27 i h. ac e ol ti n; o h shaftASr; For the-purpose of; this adjustmentthe.

4 member 62 is connected to the arm 63 by a 'bolt 65 and slot 66, the slot 66 being provided in the arm 63.

The tufts carried by the pins 45 are stripped from these pins by suction. A suction fan 70 (Fig. l) is mounted on the top plate 71 of the hopper 25. This fan is driven by a motor 72, also mounted on the top plate 71, through pulleys 73 and 74 and the connecting belt 75. Pulley 73 may be a conventional variable pitch pulley; and the meter 72 ma he, nth ted n n na fashion on an adjustable base, which along with the variable pitch pulley 73, may be used to control the spee of fan 70. The hh 7 th atm ph through outlet pipe 76 Its intake is through a conduit 77 that is connected with an upright duct 78'. The lower end of this duct 78 is secured to a screen box 80 which is bolted to the feed section 20 of the machine.

Journaled in this screen box is a rotary condenser which may be identical construction with the condenser of the web forming section oi the machine and which will he described in detail hereinafter. This condenser com- PF S S. o ax all pa ed. e na a Such h gear 17,0fs hown in Fig 8, and two coaxial cylindrical screens 6. and-.81, g. lse t s ho n t 6 an 167 in F-i g. 7 The inner screen. 87 is of coarse mesh and heavy wi je for supporting purposes; and the outer screen 86 is h hars tq Prop r a atio The t ternal gears are disposed at opposite ends, respectively, of the condenses. The screens are secured to the gears by retainer rin s such as ring 168 (Fig. 8). A duct 89 (EigflZ) extends transyersely diametrically through the condenser 85 and is bounded by duct spacers 90 and 91, similar to 'duct spacers 180, 181 (Fig. 7). The duct spacers 9.0, 91 are secured at opposite ends to the oppoadapted to be driven from the drive motor of the feed mechanism. The shaft. is journaled at opposite ends on double seal anti-friction. bearings, such as bearing 173 (Big 8), carried by the sides of the screen box and held in 'aixial, position by collars, such as collar 174 (Fig. 8), he i a s uch. as e p ha e belted to outer end, Plates, such as plate. 177 (Fig, 8), on

which theinternal gears, such as gear 170 (Fig. 8), are journaled. A pair of cone-point set screws, such as screw 197 (Fig. 8), serve-to adjustand lock the outer end plates'ontheir supports.

Adjacenttothe condenser and below it is the roll carriage (Fig. 12.) in which are journaled four driven rdilsllll, 102; 103, and 104. and two idler rolls 105. andlflfi. The roll carriage is connected to thehopper 25' by a .plate which is made of sheet metal and which isjbcltedat'oneend toan angle iron 111 by bolts 112. The angle iron is welded or otherwise secured to. the framing structure 113 of the hopper. The plate 110. is also sccuredto a rod 114 that is" mounted in the screen box 80; an d it extends into contact with the roller 101; T ej ht llh achs th es he we surface of a duct ihh hr h ihh. h rid e w n. h h pp n the screen 'box. The upper side of this duct is bounded by.

we r ?-1,P. 9; ,5. 1 iQh s, l ed to e screen The lowe r e'rid pf this seal plate is curled about a rod 117'that supports aleather seal 118. Seal 118 contacts the periphery o f the outer screenfifi of the condenser to rriakeaic tightconncction therewith. Rod 117 is secured at oppos te ends in theside plates of the screen box. Asealing strip-1 24, that is secured. to a plate 125, contaets the periphery.of thecondenser 85 at a point approxi;

mately diametrically opposite seal .-11 8-to seal the con: 9 s-q n i islet. Rhbh eal t ips. r

s en dstq the-side. pla e 1 of h o a r age. .9;

to prevent fibres from getting caught between the rolls 101, 102, 103, 104, 105 and 106 and the end plates of the carriage.

The roller 103 may be the drive roller and may be connected through chains or belts, or suitable gearing, with the driven rollers 101 and 102. The rollers 105 and 106 are simply rotatably mounted in the carriage to be driven by friction of the web being formed. The roller 104 is a fluted roller and is also driven from roller 103. Its diameter is sufficient for it to have contact with the outer screen 86 of the condenser. Roller 103 may be driven from condenser 85.

The side plates 122 of the carriage 100 may be formed with ears that are hinged on a hinge rod 120 to permit access to the condenser.

The roller 103 is closer radially to the axis 121 of the condenser than is the roller 106 or the roller 102. In fact, the distance of the several rollers 101, 105, 102, 106 and 103 from the axis 121 of the condenser gradually decreases so that the fibres carried through the air bridge to the condenser by suction are compacted between the rotating condenser and the rollers to form a mat; and as the condenser rotates, this mat is fed forward. It passes through the space denoted at 119 between the rollers 103 and 104 downwardly onto the feed plate 130 of the machine as will further be described hereinafter.

In operation, air is drawn by the fan 70 through the hopper opening 26 (Fig. 1) over the pins 55 of the stripping apron, over the tops of the pins 45 of the elevating apron 40, between the bridge plate 110 and the seal plate 115, through the duct 89 in the condenser 85, into the duct '78. Air is also drawn by the fan through the spaces between the rolls 105, 102, 106, and 103, through the condenser, and the duct 89 into the duct 78. The air stream passing over the upper end of the apron 40 and the plate 110 constitutes an air bridge, and determines the weight of the tufts of material carried into the feed opening formed between the rollers 105, 102, 106, 103 and the bottom of the condenser 85. Tufts heavier and larger than desirable are not picked off pins 45 by the air stream but return to the hopper to be opened further.

The balance between the movement of the stock material by the floor apron 27 toward the elevating apron 40, and the return of the excess material to the loading end of the hopper controls the quality of opening. For instance, if the floor apron moves the stock forward rapidly, it is caught on the pins 45 of the elevating apron, and stripped off by the stripping apron; and the material in excess of the amount of fibre being removed to make the product lap is returned to the loading end of the hopper. This action also has a rotating effect on the stock in the hopper, and has a desirable opening action. The operator can change the speed of the variable drive of the floor apron to gain more or less of this rotational action with attendant opening action.

To prevent stock from being picked up by the pins 55 of the stripping apron 50, a baffle plate 127 is mounted as shown in Fig. 1 beneath the lower reach of stripping apron 50 to extend close to the ascending reach of elevating apron 40 and to be sufficiently above floor apron 27 to avoid interference with the rotating effect of the several aprons while maintaining the stock material out of contact with the pins 55 on the lower reach of apron 50.

A damper 135 is pivotally mounted upon a rod 136 in the duct 77 to control the rate of flow of air through the feed box and thereby the thickness of the mat laid on the condenser 85. Ordinarily the rate of flow from the feeder is controlled by varying the speed of the condenser screen 85 and the carriage rolls 101, 102, 103, 104, in cooperative action. When using the feeder as a blending feeder, however, it may be necessary to provide a constant speed for the screen and the carriage rolls and to vary the weight of the mat by means of the damper. On the shaft of this damper a lever and a weight pan may be hung. By varying the weight on the pan the mat Will be more or less tightly packed in the air bridge throat, thus changing the weight of the mat by means of pressure drops in the controlled air flow. Another method of controlling the output of fibre is to vary the speed of fan 70 (Fig. 1), thus changing the packing of fibre in the wedge-like throat between the condenser and the carriage rolls.

The double drive condenser in the screen box has the advantage of simplicity. As already described, the mat is moved downward away from the condenser in the nip between the last two rolls 103 and 104 of the roll carriage. This action pulls fibres out of the screen mesh of the condenser, particularly when operating on hog hair and other bristly or stiff fibres.

Access may be had to the floor apron through a hinged door (Fig. 14) which is hinged at 141 in the feed frame and which is normally held closed by a weight 142 which is adjustable upon an arm 143. This arm is welded or otherwise secured to the door. Stops 144 are secured at opposite ends of the door to limit inward closing movement of the door. A leather seal strip 145 is secured to the door to engage the strips of the floor apron, and effects sealing at the point of passage of the floor apron past the door.

The web forming section 21 of the machine is made of fabricated steel or other suitable material with suitable reinforcements and is generally rectangular in shape. The feed plate 130 (Figs. 1 and 2) is secured to the upper face of the web section. This plate is a flat horizontally disposed plate having a smooth upper surface and is formed at its right hand end according to conventional practice with a nose or riser 151. Mounted above the bed plate and very close thereto is the feed roll 152. This is suitably journaled at its opposite ends in the frame of the web-forming section on bearings (not shown) which are adjustable in conventional manner to regulate the feed pressure. The mounting may be similar to that of the feed roll of the machine of the Buresh Patent No. 2,451,915, granted October 19, 1948. The upper side of the nose portion 151 is curved in close conformity to the curvature of the adjacent part of the periphery of the feed roll 152 for the purpose of disposing the stock material to the action of the lickerin in such way that the teeth of the lickerin will comb and draw out of the stock individual fibres.

The lickerin, which is shown at 155, may be constructed like the lickerin of the Buresh patent. It is provided with a plurality of peripheral teeth which may be similar to saw teeth. These teeth are shown in Fig. 1 but are omitted from the other figures. The lickerin may be journaled in the frame of the machine in a manner similar to the lickerin of the Buresh patent and may be driven from the motor 156 (Figs. 1 and 2). The armature shaft of this'motor carries the pulley 157, which drives the pulley 1 58, that is attached to the lickerin shaft, through the belt 159. The feed roll 152 is positively driven and may be driven from the lickerin shaft through pulleys and a belt, or through suitable gearing according to conventional practice.

As the lickerin revolves its teeth pick fibres from the mat being fed to it by the feed roll. These teeth carry these fibres around into an air duct 160 into which the lickerin extends at its bottom. A high velocity air stream circulates in this air duct through operation of a blower, as will be described hereinafter. Hence, the fibres are doffed from the lickerin by the suction of this air stream and by the centrifugal force created by the high speed rotation of the lickerin itself. The air stream travels in a direction substantially tangential to the lickerin at a point approximately 90 from the point at which the fibres are picked up by the lickerin teeth.

The fibres carried in the air stream are delivered to a rotary condenser 165. This condenser comprises an out;

assu es? side cylindrical screen 166 (Figs. 7 and 8) and a coaxial inside Cylindrical screen 167. As in the case of the condenser (Fig. 1), the inner screen 167 is of coarse mesh and heavy wire for supporting purposes, while the outer screen 166. is of fine wire for proper web formation. The two screens are secured at opposite lateral ends by identical retainer ring-s 168 and screws 169 .to. identical internal gears 170. The internal gears aredriven by two identical pinions 171 which are keyed adjacent opposite lateral ends of a shaft 172. This shaft is journaled adjacent opposite lateral ends on identical anti'frict-ion bearings 173 that are held in place by identicalcollars 174. and identical end caps 175. The end caps are secured by screws 17.6-to the identical outer end plates 177 of the condenser. The collars 174 are secured by set screws 179 to the shaft 172. The shaft 172 is driven as will be described hereinafter.

The internal gears and the screens 166 and 167 fixed thereto rotate relative to two hollow duct spacers 180 and 181 which together bound the duct 185 that extends transversely through the condenser in alignment and operative connection with the air duct 160. The ductspacer 18.0 is welded or otherwise fastened at opposite ends to. identical end plates 186; and the duct spacer 181 is welded or otherwise fastened at opposite ends to identical end plates 187. The end plates 186 are secured by screws 188- to identical inner end plates 190. The inner plates 190 are secured by screws 19-1 to the outer end plates 177. Grease seals 192 and 193 are mounted in grooves in the end faces of the internal gears 170 to seal against grease leakage along the outer and inner end plates 190 and 177. Each outer end plate 177 is secured to a support 195 by bolts (not shown). Cone point set screws 197, which engage against beveled surfaces 1990f the recesses 198 in the outer end plates 177, serve to adjust and lock the condenser bodily to properly align itwith reference to duct 185.

A catcher 200 is riveted to the lower duct spacer 181 to catchany fibres thatmight be drawn through the screen of the condenser.

Seals 205 are mounted in the frame of the machine to engage the condenser adjacent opposite ends of the duct 185 to effect sealing about the condenser. These seals are secured to the frame of the machine by screws 206'.

The fibre is deposited in random fashion .on the forarninouscondenser 165 by the high velocity air stream flowing through the condenser, and is pressed thereagainst by a web roll 215 which is driven in time with the rotation of the condenser. In the present machine the web roll is driven at a little higher surface speed than the condenser screen. This improves the surface ofthe web materially.

The drive tothe condenser and the web roll is shown in Figs. 9 and 10. The drive is from a motor 210 (Fig.1). This motor drives the shaft 221 (Fig. 9) which may be coupled directly to it, or which may be connected to it by a belt and pulleys or other suitable drive. Shaft 221 carries a sprocket 225 which drives a sprocket 226 (Fig. 9-) on the shaft 227 of conveyor roll 341 (Fig. 1) which will hereinafter be described. Shaft 227 is journaled inthe upper portion of the frame of the machine. The drive chain 228' passes from sprocket- 225 over sprocket 226 and around a sprocket 229 (Figs. 9 and 8) which is secured to the shaft '172 of the condenser drive pinions 17-1. The chain 228: thence'passes around an idler sprocket 230, down around an eccentric idler sprocket 231, up overa sprocket 232, and back down around the sprocket 225. A guard 233 coversthe whole of this drive mechanism and is, held in place by two levers 234 and 2 35 which are-rotatableon cap screws 2'36 and 237 which engage overlugs 238 and 239 formed on the guard. The sprocket 2-30-'is carriedby an'arrn 240 which is adjustable radially ofthe sprocket to take 'up slack in the chain. To this end the arm is provided with a slot 241 which receives. a dowel pin 242 and is secured .in position by a bolt 24.3 which passes through a slot 244 in the arm. The sprocket 231 is mounted eccentrically' upon a block 245. so as to permit adjustment for take-up of the chain. The sprocket 232 is rotatably mounted on a shaft 246 (Fig. 9) and is secured to a spur pinion 247. This pinion meshes with a spur gear 248; (Fig. 10) which is secured to a shaft 249 to which the web. roll 215 is secured. The shaft 249 is carried by a. yoke. member 250 which is secured to the shaft 246. Anadjusting screw 252', which threads. through yoke member 250 and which seats at its inner end against an angle plate 253 on the machine, permits of adjusting the web roll shaft 2.49 about the shaft 246 to adjust the position of the web roll relative to the con-. denser 165.

The duct 185 through the condenser can be closed at opposite ends by end plates. 260 which are frictionally held therein and which can be removed by handles 261 when it is desired to. clean out the condenser. These allow of complete access to. the inside of the condenser.

The air system of the machine is a closed, recirculat-. ing system such as disclosed in prior application Serial No. 26,256. of Buresh and Langdon, above mentioned.

. The circulation is produced by a blower or fan 222 (Fig. 1) driven by a motor 211 (Figs. 1 and 2). This motor is supported by brackets 216 from bars 217 that are suspended by brackets 218. and angle irons 219 from the frame of the machine. The armature shaft 220 of this. motor drives a shaft 264 through a belt 223 and pulleys 224 and 224'. Pulley 224. may be a conventional variable pitch pulley and .the motor 211 may be mounted on a conventional adjustable motor base to permit ad-. justrnent of the fan speed. The inlet side of the fan connects with a duct section 260 that in turn communicates with a vertical duct section 261 which extends across, the. full width of the frame of the machine at one end thereof. This duct is formed between the right hand wall of the machine and the duct plate 262. This vertical duct section is rounded at its upper end and connects with the duct section 263 which is aligned with the passageway 185 through the condenser and constitutes a continuation thereof.

The blower housing is connected at its pressure side with a duct section 265 which is connected in turn with a duct section 266, that communicates at its left hand end with a vertical duct section 267 which extends across the full width of the frame of the machine and which is formed between the left hand end wall of the machine anda duct plate 268. The duct section 267 is curved at its upper end and joins the duct section 269. The duct section 269 extends substantially across the full internal width of the frame and at one side of the lickerin 1-55 is formed between the upper wall of the l frame of the machine and the plate 270. At the opposite side of the lickerin it is formed between the plate 271 and an adjustable duct cover 275 (Fig. 4).

This duct cover is a sheet of clear plastic such as Plexiglas. It is secured at one end by screws 272 to a cross bar 277 and at its opposite end by screws 273 to an angle iron bar 274 that extends transversely of the web-forming portion of the machine parallel to bar 277. The bars 274- and 277 are welded to two parallel bars 281 which are disposed adjacent opposite lateral sides of the Plexiglas cover 275. The cover is supported at one end by a rubber seal 276, which is secured at one end between bar 277 and cover 275 by screws 27.2, and which passes over a seal rod 278 and is secured around a rod 279. The seal rod 278 is slidable in a diagonal slot 280 in the sides of the machine.

Mounted adj-acent and in operative relation to the lickerin 155- is atubular dofling bar 292. The doffing bar 292 has discs 297 (Fig. 6') secured in it adjacent its opposite ends. Each of these discs has a screw'287 Q threaded in it which has a head with a hexagonal or other polygonal shaped recess. There is a hollow bolt 285 mounted in each side of the machine. A removable manually-operable handle 302 may be pushed through the bore of the bolt 285 to engage in the recess of either screw 287 to rotate the doffing bar.

The dofiing bar 292 is a polished stainless steel tube dropped into the side plates 282. The dofling bar is to prevent air-bound fibers being carried around with the lickerin 155 past the point where the air and centrifugal force should dofi the fibers from the lickerin. The air stream and the high speed of rotation of the lickerin are intended to doif the fibers; but the lickerin is rotating at such high speed that there is a tendency for it to move air around with it in a sort of cylinder of air which would tend to keep the fibers on the lickerin. The dofling bar is mounted close to the lickerin so as to project into that portion of the air, which might be carried around with the lickerin, thereby to break up this particular air, and permit the air stream in the main duct 160 to dolf the fibers from the lickerin.

Heretofore, a fabricated doffing bar has been used which has been bolted to the lickerin cover assembly. When the cover was opened the complete assembly of cover, dofling bar, and duct cover lifted out. This type of construction required straight end fits with not over .002 inch clearance between the ends of the doffing bar and the outside dimension between the side plates. Many hours of machinists labor were involved in making a fit to such close tolerances. A fibre may be .002 inch or less in diameter and a single fibre catching in a crack between the end of the dotting bar and the side wall is a nucleus for the formation of a textile rope that may wave freely in the air stream and upset the web formation. This rope of textile fibres may grow to be ten or more inches in length and one inch or more in diameter at the large end. It will be conical in shape, all the fibres being attached to the single fibre that was caught. The friction forces of the air stream will quickly break the rope. But it will be carried to the condenser producing a blemish on the web. This process of rope formation, breakage and deposit on the web is repeated until the machine is shut down and the single fibre is dislodged.

In the present machine the side plates 282 are formed with flanges 289 (Fig. 4) which together support duct cover 275. These flanges terminate at their front ends in arcuate flange portions 293 that engage around dofiing bar or tube 292.

The cover plate 275 has a beveled front edge 303 to which is secured a rubber sealing strip 304. The sealing strip 304 and beveled front edge 303 of the cover plate are pulled up tightly against the dofling bar 292, to hold the doffing bar firmly seated against the arcuate flange portions 298 of the side plates 282, by conepointed screws 293 (Fig. 6) which thread through bars 281 and which engage in conical recesses 300 in the side plates 282. The conical recesses 300 are offset somewhat downwardly with reference to the screws as shown in Fig. 4. When the screws are tightened up, then, the cover plate is forced forwardly and upwardly and the side plates 282 are also forced laterally against the sides of the machine. Thus, the arcuate flange portions 298 and sealing strip 304 will be drawn tightly against the dofling bar, and the side plates 282 will be forced tightly against the sides of the machine. The spring washers 286, which are mounted on each hollow bolt 285, and each of which is interposed between the adjacent side of the machine and apair of nuts 287', that thread on the associated bolt 285, serve to hold the side plates 282 resiliently and frictionally against the sides of the machine at all times.

The axle fit between the dofling bar and its mounting in the machine of the present invention is less apt to catch a fibre than the sliding fit heretofore employed along the side walls. Moreover, the doffing bar of the present machine may be rotated so that deposits on its surface of dirt or greasy material will be polished ofi by a felt pad 291 (Fig. 4) secured at the top of the doffing bar. Such rotation is only required at intervals; and the quantity of the material subject to disposal is minute, but if not removed is troublesome. The pad 291 is secured by a bolt 288 to the cover plate 290 of the lickerin. The pad 291 also acts as a seal against the lickerin 1.55. A rod or shaft 294 is secured in the sides of the machine and carries a stationary seal piece 295 that wraps over a rod 296 to seal closely to the web roll 215.

The floor 270 (Figs. 1 and 2) of duct section 269 converges toward the feed plate and lickerin on the approach or pressure side of the lickerin; and the floor 271 diverges from the wall or cover plate 275 (Fig. 4) on the suction side of the lickerin. The cover 275 itself is inclined upwardly from the lickerin to the condenser so that the upper and lower walls of the duct recede from one another between the lickerin and the condenser to expose a wide area of the condenser for laying of the web. The inclination of cover 275 to floor 271 is adjustable. To this end, the seal rod 278 has reduced bearing portions 301 (Fig. 4) at opposite ends which engage in slots 280. Nuts (not shown) which thread on end portions 301, serve to hold the rod 278 and duct cover 275 in any adjusted position. I

The duct is narrowed to its minimum width radially of the lickerin to provide a venturi effect and get maximum velocity of the air to readily effect dofiing of the fibres from the lickerin. Heretofore this narrowing has been by means of the bottom wall of the duct. In the machine of the present invention this is effected by use of a removable saber, which forms this section of the bottom wall of the duct. This saber is denoted at 305 (Figs. 2 and 4). It comprises a body portion 306 that has generally U-shaped strut members 307 secured thereto at opposite lateral sides thereof to engage and slide on guides 308 that are secured to the floor of duct sections 269 and 271 by screws 309. The saber itself has a thin plate covering which is secured to its body by screws 310 and which extends over the struts 307 and ways 308. Its upper surface is of inverted V-shape to follow and smoothly join the floor portions 270 and 271 of duct 160; and it is so disposed as to approach closest to the lickerin at a point radially directly beneath the lickerin, as clearly shown in Fig. 4. The saber can be removed from the machine for cleaning by a handle 311 (Fig. 5) which is secured to a plug 312. Plug 312 is secured to the body portion 306 of the saber by screws 314.

The saber is so made that it withdraws lengthwise for cleaning deposits of dirt or of greasy fibre that form in line with the centrifugal throwoff from the action taking place at the feed bar 130. Deposits sometimes also occur downstream from the venturi formed between the likerin and the saber. The operator can pull the saber, wipe it off clean, and return it to position. This enhances the maintenance of the machine and reduces time out for cleaning.

To secure uniform thickness of deposits of the fibres across the full width of the condenser, control mechanism is provided. Widthwise uniformity can be attained or the thickness of the web can be varied at will, by dividing the air stream by a set of vertical, knee-type baffles in the duct sections 267 and 269 that lead to the likerin, and by separately controlling the velocity of the air in the different portions of the air stream. These baffles are simply thin right angular shaped plates 320 (Figs. 2 and 3) that are mounted parallel to one another and that divide the breadth of the vertical duct section 267 and of horizontal duct section 269 into, in the case shown, eight channels.

In each of these channels there is mounted an adjust.

ass-0,497

able venturi device. This venturi device comprises a fined sheet 321 of angular shape welded or otherwise secured to the inside wall 268 of the. vertical section 267 of'the duct, and an angular sheet 323' secured at itsupper end by a screw 324 to the outside wall of the machine, and secured at its lower end to an adjusting screw 326. that-threads into-a plate 327 that is boltech by a. bolt 328' to. the outer walll oi the machine. Each adjusting'screw" 326 threads through: a nut 3291 that is carried; by the plate-.3273. By adjusting each screw in: or outgxthe position of the associated. venturi sheet 323 can. be adjusted. as.-shown in. dotted. lines in Fig. 2. Thus' the quantity of air-moving upwardly in the channel between two bafiie. plates 320 can be controlled to control the movement of the. fibres in the duct between the; lickerin. and the condensem. By. varying the venturi openings, asv shown in. plan section in Fig. 3 control of the thickness of deposit ofthe fibres on the. condenser across. the whole. width of the condenser can; be effected. Thereby uniformity of thickness ofi theweb canl be attained, or any-desired varia-' tioniirrthickness. of the web may beachieved. In Fig. 3, the venturi; sheets 321, 323 are. shown progressively further apart as they approach the side wall of the machine. The-venturi plates with the adjusting screws permit controll of the-rate of fiow of air in the eight channelsto give more or. less air in each one of the channels. For in.- stance, if the web'off the condenser is thinat one edge, the first channel in line with the edge that isthin willbe closed otf in air supply and the airflowing in the adjacent channels will be increased. As a resultthe airflow in thelchannel next to the edge channel willtend toexpand widthwise, as it travels toward the condenser, carrying fibre toward the desired side of the duct, and. thereby compensating for the thinness of web at. that side. This principlecan be applied'to any sectionor point widthwise. f-. the condenser. The adjustment of the diflerent ven-, turi devices can be made while running andthe results observed visually on the product web. Thus a.web ofuniform thickness across the whole of its width, or of any desired variation in thickness at different points. across.its width can beobtained.

'Iio assist in removal of any dirt, powder, fibre debris, or fibres that might get caught on the lower wall. 270v of. the duct section 269, a compressed air tube 335, (Figs. 2.- and 3 is mounted transversely in the machine to ex? tend across. it through notches 336- in the baflles 320. Holes .may be provided in this ductto permit compressed air to drive the foreign matter. or fibres off the wall 269, as. indicated diagrammatically in Fig. 2.

The, fan'222. (Fig. 1-) may. be, drivenat variable speeds. A. conventional variable speed drive may. be used forv this purpose; and motor 211 (Fig. 2). and pulley 224. may beadjustedaccordingly by screw. 337 This screw isjournaledin oneof. the brackets 218 and threads into oneof the; supportingbrackets 216. It. isrotated by handwheeL 338. This variable speed control isused to control the rate of circulation. of air. through the. ducts oflthe. web; forming section of the. machine. Some stock requires a; light. flow of air especiallyin-making thin and highgrade, webs. On the, other hand, heavy fibres like. asbestos,.glass,. etc. may require a heavier flow of air through the system. Especially thickwebs cause a high pressure. drop on the condenser; audit is necessary to speedup the. fanto compensate for the increased pressure, drop to maintain the. samerrate of air flow.

As soon asa web starts to for-mitsleading end islifted oft? the condenser and isplaced on-the. top of. a.conveyor. belt 3.40. (Fig. 1) which moves over the rollers, 341 and 342.. Thisconveyor belt carries the. web away fromitlie. machine. as it. continues tobeformed.

Imthe machine described, the. feeding mechanismrcauses. the.:.big bunches. offibrous material to 1 be: worked on; im mediately. The fibre :is: opened i more-gently; and. yet-:quite: thoroughly. Where a high speed stripper is. used andstooa muchistock;is-.ibro.ught up:.neps.will'.be:put in the-.stock 753 section13651-at: both. ends. A similar sealingstrip'366 12 and some other machine must get them out. The feeding mechanism of the present machine avoids formation of neps. jammed. It provides, moreover, a blending feeder for conventional mill work.

For very thin webs,. the present machine allows of correction. by flow of air along the walls of the machine so that the air can spread to compensate for any tendencyto thinness at the edges. of the web. 'Ilhus control: anduniform thickness of the web can be obtained. bafiles'or partitions 320, however, should not be tooclose to. the lickerin. Chance should be given for the air to blend; With this machine the fan speed is no longer critical. Previously if the fan speed was too high it blew the web away from the wall.

The removable saber, the rotatable dofiing bar, and the air tube 335 permit easy cleaning of the machine as does the open-ended condenser. These, too, therefore, contribute to uniform-web thickness.

The improved construction of condenser is also an important feature of the present invention.

Both -ends of the condenser are identical in construction. The drive is by means of a shaft that passes clear throughthe condenserfrom end to end. With this construction, with the-rubber seals, the internal gear drive can be packed with grease. The major advantage of the type of construction shown, however, as compared withthesingle end drive, has been in the field. The undriven end of the condenser as heretofore constructed has tended to become fibre or dirt bound. A consequence of this is twisting of the screen.

Among other advantages of the improved condenser construction are the ability to open the ends for cleaning,

the ease of removal of the condenser from the webber,.

the endwise adjustment withcone-point screws, the elimination of the supportbrackets, etc. A further advantage is that the same type condenser can be used in both the feedand the web-forming sections of the machine.

The machine of the present invention has, therefore, outstanding. advantages over prior constructions.

A. somewhat different form of machine, but a machine having all of the advantages of'the first described embodiment of the invention, is illustrated somewhat diagrammatically in 'Fig. 15. The feed plate, feed roll, lickerin, condenser, and web roll may be of the same construction as, previously described, and are here designated by the same reference numerals.

Inthis machine, however, there is no vertical duct section at the side of the machine and the horizontal duct section is largely eliminated. The web-forming section only of this machine is shown. It is divided into two chambers 351' and 152 by a vertical partition 353; There are two fans 355' mounted side-by-side in spaced relationship in one chamber 3520f the machine. This chamber is defined by partition 353 and the outside right hand wall 354 of the machine.

is fixed acover plate 357 which carries a leather sealing strip. 356 that engages the condenser 165. The venturisection of the. air duct of this machine is defined'by the lickerin 155. and a tube 360 which takes the place of'the saber 305" of the machine previously described. This tube 360 is mounted between the-vertical partition wall 353 and an' inclined wall 362 which extends from the of this duct is formed'by the cover plate of the machinewhich may be of the same construction and which may be mounted in-the sameway as cover plate 275 (Fig. 4-).

The side walls of this duct section are formed, of course.

by the side walls of the machine. Sealingstrips 363 and 364; that are secured to opposite ends. of the plate 362. and that engage, respectively, with. the-periphery of the tube. 360 and the. condenser 165, serveto seal the duct It also obviates overloading and cannot be To this right hand wall there that engages the tube 360 and that is secured to the vertical partition wall 353, seals the duct at that section. The left hand section 351 of the machine is bounded by the partition wall 353 and the outside left hand wall 370 of the machine. The air from the fans 355 is blown into this section. Mounted in this section is a bafile plate 375 against which the air is blown'and which causes the air to pass downwardly through a narrow opening 376 and thence between the lower end of the plate 375 and an upwardly inclined plate 378 which is fastened to the base of the machine. The air then passes into chamber 351, causing a pressure drop, which expands the air widthwise. The upper portion of the section 351 is divided by baffle plates 380 into channels similar to those previously described. In each of these channels there is mounted a sheet 382 which is adjustable by a rod 384 to different positions as indicated in dotted lines in Fig. 15. This sheet 382 cooperates with the upper end of the bafile 375 to provide a venturi effect. The speed of the air in each channel can therefore be controlled to permit laying down a uniform web or any desired type of web on the condenser.

The web is taken off the condenser and placed upon the conveyor belt 340 which carries it away from the machine.

A door 385 is provided in the chamber 351 to permit cleaning out the machine. Due to the pressure drop, after the air passes through the narrow passage between the plate 378 and the bafile 375 dirt will drop out.

The tube 360, which takes the place of the saber, can be rotated or pulled out of one end of the machine, or it may be adjusted endwise to free fibres caught along the joint between the side wall 353 and the tube. Rotation will scrape off the dirt or greasy fibres against the felt seal 366 mounted on the vertical partition.

The two fans 355, with two inlets each, permit the size of the fan shaft to be increased to get away from 'Whip or vibration of the shaft.

The machine of this embodiment of the invention has a simple structure, reducing the machining and the material required.

While the invention has been described in connection with two different embodiments thereof, it will be understood that it is capable of further modification, and this application is intended to cover any variations, uses, or adaptations of the invention following, in general, the principles of the invention and including such departures from the present disclosure as come within known or customary practice in the art to which the invention pertains and as may be applied to the essential features hereinbefore set forth and as fall Within the scope of the invention or the limits of the appended claims.

Having thus described our invention, what we claim is:

1. In a machine of the character described, a rotary foraminous condenser, means including a duct for conducting airborne fibres to said condenser for deposit thereon to form a fibre web, means for creating an air stream in said duct, a plurality of partitions: dividing said duct into a plurality of channels, and means for controlling the thickness of deposit of the fibres across the width of said condenser comprising an adjustable venturi device in each channel controlling the speed of movement of air in said channel.

2. A machine for forming a random fibre web comprising a rotary lickerin, means for feeding stock material to the lickerin so that in its rotation the lickerin dofis fibres from the stock material, a movable foraminous condenser spaced from said lickerin, an air duct into which both the lickerin and the condenser project, a fan connected to said duct for eifecting by suction high speed flow of air in said duct to provide an air stream for dofling fibres from the lickerin and conveying them to said condenser, means for conducting air from the pressure side of said fan to said lickerin, a plurality of partitions disposed in said duct ahead of said lickerin and in spaced relation thereto for dividing said duct into a plurality of channels, and means in each channel for controlling the speed of flow of air tllerethrough.

3. A machine for forming a random. fibre web comprising .a rotary lickerin, means for feeding stock material to the lickerin so that in its rotation the lickerin doifs fibres from the stock material, a movable foraminous condenser spaced from said lickerin, an air duct into which both the lickerin and the condenser project, a fan connected to said duct for effecting by suction high speed flow of air in said duct to provide an air stream for dofiing fibres from the lickerin and conveying them to said condenser, means for conducting air from the pressure side of said fan to said lickerin, a plurality of partitions disposed in said duct ahead of said lickerin and in spaced relation thereto for dividing said duct into a plurality of channels, and means in each channel for controlling the speed of flow of air therethrough, and means for adjusting the speed of said fan.

4. A machine for forming a random fibre web comprising a rotary lickerin, means: for feeding stock material to the lickerin so that in its rotation the lickerin doifs fibres from the stock material, a movable foraminous condenser spaced from. said lickerin, an air duct into which both the lickerin and the condenser project, a fan connected to said duct for eifecting by suction high speed flow of air in said duct to provide an air stream for dofiing fibres from. the lickerin and conveying them to said condenser, and a saber disposed in said duct radially beneath the lickerin and extending transversely across said duct to narrow said duct Where the lickerin projects into it, said saber constituting a portion of said duct and being removable transversely of said duct for cleaning.

5. A machine for forming a random fibre web comprising a rotary lickerin, means for feeding stock material to the lickerin so that in its rotation the lickerin doifs fibres from the stock material, a movable foraminous condenser spaced from said lickerin, an air duct into which both the lickerin and the condenser project, a fan connected to said duct for effecting by suction high speed flow of air in said duct to provide an air stream for docing fibres from the lickerin and conveying them to said condenser, and a saber disposed in said duct radially beneath the lickerin and extending transversely across said duct to narrow said duct where the lickerin projects into it, said saber constituting a portion of said duct and being removable transversely of said duct for cleaning, said saber being of inverted V-shape in cross-section and having its vertex radially opposite the lickerin.

6. A machine for forming a random fibre web comprising a rotary lickerin, means for feeding stock material to the lickerin so that in its rotation the lickerin dofis fibres from the stock material, a movable foraminous condenser spaced from said lickerin, an air duct into which both the lickerin and the condenser project, a fan connected to said duct for effecting by suction high speed flow of air in said duct to provide an air stream for doffing fibres from the lickerin and conveying them to said condenser, and a saber disposed in said duct radially beneath the lickerin and extending transversely across said duct to narrow said duct Where the lickerin projects. into it, said saber constituting a portion of said duct and being removable transversely of said duct for cleaning, said saber being a cylindrical tube and being rotatable, and a. sealing and cleaning member disposed in operative relation to said tube to clean said tube when it is rotated.

7. A machine for forming a random fibre Web comprising a rotary lickerin, means for feeding stock material to the lickerin so that in its rotation the lickerin doflis fibres from the stock material, a rotatable dofling bar mounted adjacent said lickerin and in operative relation thereto, a rotary foraminous condenser spaced from said lickerin and said doifing bar, an air duct into which the lickerin, dofiing bar and condenser project, a fan connected to said ductforcft'ectingby suctionhigh speed flow of air in said duct to provi cleian air-stream for dofling fibres from the lickerin and conveying them to said condenser, means for rotating the-lickerinand the condenser, acleaning pad disposed in operative relation to said dofling bar, and means formanually rotating said dolhng'bar'to' clean the same.

8. A machine for forming a random fibre webcomprising a rotary liekerin, means for feeding stockmaterial to the-lickerin so that in-its rotation the lickerin doffs fibres from-the stock material, a rotatable dofiing bar mounted adjacent said lickerin and in operative relation thereto, a rotary foraminouscondenser spaced from said lickerin and' said doifing bar, an-air duct into which the lickering, doifing bar and condenser project, a fan connected to-said d'uct for effecting-by suction high speed fiow ofair in said duct to provide an air streamfor doifing fibres'from the lickerin and conveying themto said condenser, means for rotating the hckerin and the condenser, a cleaningpad=dis'- posed in oporativerelation to=said' dofling' bar, and means for manually rotating said doffing barto clean the same, and asaber disposed in said ductradially beneath theliclteri'n and extending transversely across said duct to narrow saidduct where the-lickerin projects into it; said saber constituting a portion of said duct and being movable for cleaning.

9; A machine for forming a random fibre web com prising a rotary lickerin, means for feeding stock materialsto the lickerin so that in its rotation the lickerin d'offs-fibres from the stock material, a rotary forarninous condenser spaced from said lickerin, an air duct into which both the lickerin and the'c'ond'enser' project, a-fan= connected to said duct forefiectingby suction high spe'ed flow-'ofi air in said duct to provide anair stream for dofiing fibres from. the lickerinand conveying" them t'o' saidtcondenser, means for conducting" air from the pres sure side of'said fa'n'to' said lick'erin, a pluralityof par-'- titions disposed in said ductahead of said licke'rin and in: spaced relation thereto fordividing saidduct into a plurality of channels; and means in eachchannel for controlling the. speed of flow of air therethrough, and means. disposed in said channels for directingcompressed aii into-sai'd conducting'means toclean said conductingmeans;

10. A machine for forming'a randomfibre' web comprising a rotary lickerin, means for feeding stock material to'the lickerin" so'that in its rotation the lickerin dofls fibres from the stock material; arotatable doffing bar mounted adjacent said lickerinand inoperative relation thereto; a rotary: foraminous condenser spaced from saidlickerin and sa'id dofling' bar, an air duct intowhichthe: lickorin, clottingbar, and condenser project, said duct: extending from thelickerin through the condenser and 'ba'ck-to' the lickerin again, a fan connected to said ductiion elfecting by suction high speed flow ofair in' said duct-to provide an a'ir streamfor-doifingfibres' from theiliokerin and conveying them to-the condenser, means for. rotating the lickerin and the condenser, a cleaning pad disposed in: operative relation to said dbfiing bar, means for. manuallyfirotating said dofiing bar to-clean'the same,.a saber'dispo'sed in' said duct radially-beneath the lickerin: and: extending transversely across said ductto narrow said'duct'wherethe. lickerinprojects into-it; said saberconstituting a :portionof sa'id duct iandtb'ein gr'emov able transversely: of: said ductfor cleaning, andmeans- L6 disposed in said duct ahead of saidlickerinfor directing compressed air intosaidductto clean said duct.

1 1 Amachine' for forming a random fibre web-com prising a base', a partition dividing said base into two" chambers, arotary lickerin journaled inth'e base, means for feeding stockmaterial to the lickerinso'that in'it's rotation the licke'rin doffs fibres from the stockmaterial, a rotary condenser journaled insaid"hase, an air'duct into which both the lickerinand condenser project, a fan mounted in one of said chambers and connected on its suction side to said duct for eifecting by suction high" speed flowof air in said duct to provide an air stream'for' dofiing fihres from said lickerin andconveyingthemd'o' saidcondens'er, said fanbeing connected on its pressure side with the other of-saidchambers, a second duct in said other chamber into which the air'fiom' the" pressure side of the'fa'n'pa'sses, said second duct havingia'restricted mouthopeninginto said other chamber, a third ductlea'ding from said. other chamber to said lick'erin, a plurality ofpartitions' in the last-named duct dividing said lastnamed" duct into'a plurality of channels, ame'mb'e'radjiist able in each channel to control the area therecifat'a point along it'sIength; and means for rotating, said liclierin and said condenser and for d'r'iving's'ai'd fan.

12 A machine for forming a random fibre weh cornpri'sing' abase', a" partition dividing said base into two chambers, a rotary'lick'erin joutnaled in the base, means for feeding st'ocli material to the li'cke'rin so that in its rotation'th'e lickerin dofis fibres'fro'm the stock material; a rotary condenser journ'aled in said base, an air duct into-Which both' the lick'e'rin and condenser project, a fa'n'mountedin' one of said chambers and connected on it'ssuetio'n side't'o sa'id duct for effecting by suction high speed flow'of airin s'a'id duct to provide anair stream foridofiing fibres from said lickerin and conveying them totsaidcondenlser, said fain being connected on its pressure'sidewith' the othero'f said chambers, a secondduct 1n said other chamber into which the air from the pressure side of the fan passes, said' second duct having. a restricted mo'uth'o'pening into said'other chamber, a third' duct leading from said otherchamber to said lickerin, a pluralit'y'of partitions in the last-named duct' dividing saiddast-named duct into a. plurality of channels, a-memb'e'r adjustable' i'n. each channel to control the area thereof are point along its length, and means for rotating said lick'erin" and said condenser and for driving said' fan, and" a saber disposed between the first-named partitionand thefirst-na'med duct to provide a-narrow connection between said "first-named and said third duct' radially opposite the li'cke'rin; said sab'e'r extending transversely of a said first narned' and saidithird' ducts at the juncture thereof and bein'gre'rn'ovable for cleaning.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification19/303, 19/89, 19/307
International ClassificationD04H1/70, D04H1/72
Cooperative ClassificationD04H1/72
European ClassificationD04H1/72