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Publication numberUS2891252 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 23, 1959
Filing dateJun 1, 1956
Priority dateJun 1, 1956
Publication numberUS 2891252 A, US 2891252A, US-A-2891252, US2891252 A, US2891252A
InventorsMario Lazo
Original AssigneeMario Lazo
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sleeping device
US 2891252 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 23, 1959 I LAZQ 2,891,252

SLEEPING DEVICE I Filed June 1, 1956 v INVENTOR.

M A RIO LAZO .F|G.3. dwarf/2M ATTORNEY- United States Patent 2,891,252 SLEEPING DEVICE Mario Lazo, Havana, Cuba Application June 1, 1956, Serial No. 588,792 2 Claims. (Cl. 2-15) This invention relates to a sleeping device and is more particularly concerned with a mechanical device for use in association with the eyes and adjacent parts of the human anatomy for the purpose of inducing or tending to induce a relaxed condition of the body, a condition favorable to sleep.

The present invention is to be distinguished from the customary eye shades or sleep shades which are substantially nothing more than excluders of light and which are provided mainly for persons who have difiiculty in falling asleep in the presence of light, even very dim light, such as often results from diffusion of light from the exterior of a window around the sides of a window shade.

There are many persons who have difliculty in falling asleep irrespective of light conditions due to the fact that they have difliculty in relaxing. I have found that this condition can be ameliorated or completely overcome in many cases by the application of pressure to certain parts of the orbital region. In accordance with this invention, there is provided a device which can be removably attached to the head of a person in preparation for sleep. The device contains pressure applicator pads which are shaped and positioned so as to apply gentle pressure transmitted downwardly through the upper lid of the closed eyes against the eyeball and upwardly against the inferior aspect of the superior orbital rim or mar- In the accompanying drawing there is illustrated an em bodiment of this invention which will be more fully understood in conjunction with the following description.

In the drawing:

Figure 1 is a front elevation view of the device as it appears in operative position on the head of a person.

Figure 2 is a section along the line 2-2 of Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a rear perspective view of the device apart from the person.

Referring with more particularity to the drawing in which like numerals designate like parts, the embodiment illustrated comprises a sheet of relatively stiff material 11, such as a heavy cloth or cloth reinforced with buckram or crinoline 12, having a pair of lobe portions 13 and 14, one for each eye of a person, connected together by a somewhat narrower nose bridge portion 15. Elastic or non-elastic strings, cords or cloth 16 and 17 are attached to the outer ends of the device and to an adjustable elastic band 18 for encircling the head, as shown. The elastic band feature may be eliminated.

The inner side of the device (toward the face) is provided with two longitudinal oval-shaped pressure pad members 19 and 20, one in each of the lobes 13 and 14, respectively. The upper part of each lobe is adapted to lie against the forehead, just over the superior orbital rim of its corresponding orbital cavity, substantially as shown. The pad portions are oval in shape and disposed immediately below the superior orbital margin and are of generally triangular cross section to fit into the triangular space between the upper surface of the eyeball and the superior orbital margin. In this position, the inner sides 27 and 28 of these pad portions become slightly concave to fit the corresponding convex parts of the orbital cavity 25 and 26, respectively. And also, in this position, the pad exerts a gentle pressure against both the eyeball and the roof of the upper orbital rim, the pressure being downward (against the eyeball) and upward against the orbital margin and adjacent roof, across which many nerves pass, as well as exerting a slight pressure inward against adjacent parts of the nose. The application of gentle pressure upon these areas is an essential feature of this invention. The magnitude of the pressure may be varied by adjusting the length of the band 18, if such a band is used.

The pad members 19 and 20 are secured permanently to the cloth material 11 by any suitable means, such as rows of stitches 29 and 30 around the margins. Part of the pad members could be left free so as to permit them to adjust themselves more readily to the anatomy of different faces. The pad itself may be made of any suitable material, such as fluffy cotton 31 enclosed in a light cloth casing 32.

The exclusion of light as a means of inducing sleep is well known and is not a factor of the present invention. It is, however, used in conjunction with it although the shade portion may be smaller in area (not reaching so far down on the cheek bones when in position) than is the case with the shades now commonly in use.

I have found that after using this device for a short time the two pressure pads 19 and 20 tend to adjust and fit themselves into the orbital cavities, a process which a person may aid by applying pressure by the elastic members 16 and 1'7 so as to pivot the two pressure parts into the orbital cavities. The upward pressure by the pad portions against the roof of the orbital cavity and inward toward the nose has a soothing and relaxing effect on the many nerves which crisscross the upper and inner area of the orbital regions of each eye.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. A sleeping device comprising a sheet of material of a length to extend across the face of a person, said sheet having an upper portion adapted to rest against the forehead of the person over the eyebrows and having a lower edge adapted to rest over the cheek bones, a pair of oval-shaped pressure pads, one for each eye, carried by the sheet, each pad being substantially triangular in cross section, having its major axis in the horizontal direction and being secured to the inner side of the sheet in a position opposite the cavity of the respec tive eye between the upper side of the eyeballs and the forehead and of a size to enter the said cavity exclusive of any other portion of the eyeball, and means for supporting the sheet on the face.

2. A sleeping device comprising a sheet of material of a length suflicient to extend across the face of a person and cover the eyes, said sheet being formed so that its upper edge is adapted to rest against the forehead of the person over the eyebrows and the lower edge over the check bones, a pair of oval-shaped pressure pads, one for each eye, said pads being substantially triangular in cross section, having their major axes in the horizontal direction, being attached to the inner side of the sheet and being of a shape, size and in a position on the sheet to fit into the respective orbital cavity between the eyebrow and the upper part of the eyeball exclusive of any other portion of the eyeball and against the side of the nose ridge at the level of the eye, and means for supporting the sheet on the face.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,917,117 Hines July 4, 1933 2,165,668 Vaccaro July 11, 1939 2,305,080 Hemphill et a1 Dec. 15, 1942 2,343,157 Quering Feb. 29, 1944

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1917117 *Oct 3, 1931Jul 4, 1933Hines William WBandage for the eyes
US2165668 *Apr 4, 1938Jul 11, 1939Harry JacobsonEye protector
US2305080 *Jul 20, 1940Dec 15, 1942Hemphill Edward CLight shield
US2343157 *Aug 16, 1941Feb 29, 1944Quering Mary MEye shield and sinus compressor
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4790031 *Sep 29, 1986Dec 13, 1988Duerer Stormy WEye shield
US5180360 *Apr 15, 1991Jan 19, 1993Rhame Jr Robert WAtraumatic eye patch
US5183059 *Jan 16, 1992Feb 2, 1993David LeonardiEye shield retention system
US5389066 *Oct 23, 1992Feb 14, 1995Rhame, Jr.; Robert W.Atraumatic eye patch
US6155261 *Mar 22, 1999Dec 5, 2000Day; Daniel K.Method and apparatus for relieving intraocular pressure
US6193740 *Dec 18, 1998Feb 27, 2001Andrea Janine RodriguezEye pillows with adjustable strap
US6543056 *Mar 29, 2001Apr 8, 2003Antonio SpiteriSleep shield
US6745397 *Oct 31, 2001Jun 8, 2004Shirley MagidsonEye shade
US7395554 *Sep 19, 2005Jul 8, 2008Nawari Trading Co., Ltd.Mask for eyes
US7703148Oct 26, 2005Apr 27, 2010Adrian Hardwick BowersLight occlusive eyelid cover that permits uninhibited sight
US7976573Jan 17, 2008Jul 12, 2011Tearscience, Inc.Inner eyelid heat and pressure treatment for treating meibomian gland dysfunction
US7981095Sep 29, 2006Jul 19, 2011Tearscience, Inc.Methods for treating meibomian gland dysfunction employing fluid jet
US7981145Sep 29, 2006Jul 19, 2011Tearscience Inc.Treatment of meibomian glands
US7981146Jan 17, 2008Jul 19, 2011Tearscience Inc.Inner eyelid treatment for treating meibomian gland dysfunction
US7981147Jan 17, 2008Jul 19, 2011Tearscience, Inc.Outer eyelid heat and pressure treatment for treating meibomian gland dysfunction
US8007524Jan 17, 2008Aug 30, 2011Tearscience, Inc.Heat treatment and heat loss reduction for treating meibomian gland dysfunction
US8025689Jun 23, 2010Sep 27, 2011Tearscience, Inc.Method and apparatus for treating meibomian gland dysfunction
US8083787May 15, 2006Dec 27, 2011Tearscience, Inc.Method and apparatus for treating meibomian gland dysfunction
US8128673Jan 17, 2008Mar 6, 2012Tearscience, Inc.System for inner eyelid heat and pressure treatment for treating meibomian gland dysfunction
US8128674Jan 17, 2008Mar 6, 2012Tearscience, Inc.System for outer eyelid heat and pressure treatment for treating meibomian gland dysfunction
US8137390Jan 17, 2008Mar 20, 2012Tearscience, Inc.System for providing heat treatment and heat loss reduction for treating meibomian gland dysfunction
US8187310Feb 11, 2011May 29, 2012Tearscience, Inc.Method and apparatus for treating gland dysfunction
US8187311Feb 11, 2011May 29, 2012Tearscience, Inc.Method and apparatus for treating gland dysfunction
US8523928Feb 7, 2012Sep 3, 2013Tearscience, Inc.System for inner eyelid heat and pressure treatment for treating meibomian gland dysfunction
US8617229Feb 7, 2012Dec 31, 2013Tearscience, Inc.System for outer eyelid heat and pressure treatment for treating meibomian gland dysfunction
US8628504Sep 21, 2010Jan 14, 2014Tearscience, Inc.Method and apparatus for treating meibomian gland dysfunction employing fluid jet
US8632578Feb 8, 2012Jan 21, 2014Tearscience, Inc.System for providing heat treatment and heat loss reduction for treating meibomian gland dysfunction
US8685073Sep 23, 2011Apr 1, 2014Tearscience, Inc.Apparatus for treating meibomian gland dysfunction
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/15
International ClassificationA61M21/00, A61H39/04
Cooperative ClassificationA61H39/04, A61M21/00
European ClassificationA61H39/04