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Publication numberUS2891445 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 23, 1959
Filing dateMar 29, 1957
Priority dateMar 31, 1956
Publication numberUS 2891445 A, US 2891445A, US-A-2891445, US2891445 A, US2891445A
InventorsStaubach Heinrich
Original AssigneeErnst Leitz Canada Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Telescopic sight
US 2891445 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 23, 1959 H. STAUBACH TELEscoPIc SIGHT Filed Maron 29, l1957 TSR INVENTOR. HE/NR/CH STAUBACH Attorneys .Il-lne 23, 1959 H, STAUBACH 2,891,445 j TELESCOPIC SIGHT Filed March 29, 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Fi .6 34 33 g IN V EN TOR.

HEINRICH S TA UBA 6H BY f* A Home ys United States Patent G TELESCOPIC SIGHT Heinrich Staubach, Midland, Ontario, Canada, assignor to Ernst Leitz Canada Limited, Optical Works, Midland, ()ntario, Canada Application March 29, 1957, Serial No. 649,453

Claims priority, application Germany March 31, 1956 3 Claims. (Cl. 88-32) The present invention relates to a telescopic sight having an adjustable reticule, more particularly, to a reticule which may be adjusted in two directions at right angles to each other by adjusting members which are independent of each other.

It is the primary object of this invention to provide improvements in an adjustable reticule for telescopic sights.

It is another object of this invention to provide a telescopic sight having a reticule which may 'be adjusted in either of two directions at right angles to each other and each adjustment being independent and separate from the other.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a telescopic sight having a reticule which may tbe selectively positioned by adjusting means which do not protrude laterally ot the sight.

It is an additional object of this invention to provide a telescopic sight having a substantially cylindrical casing which houses an adjustable reticule and which is not marred by any projecting adjusting knobs or the like.

It is still a further object of this invention to provide a telescopic sight wherein adjustments of the reticule to cover a target can be made at will by separate adjustment of the reticule in horizontal and vertical directions.

Other objects and advantages of this invention will become apparent upon reference to the accompanying drawings wherein:

Figure l is a longitudinal sectional view of the telescopic sight of this invention as taken along the lines 1-1 of Figure 7;

Figure 2 is a top plan View of the telescopic sight illustrated in Figure 1 with a central portion of the casing removed and parts of the reticule adjusting members being shown in section;

Figure 3 is a sectional view taken along the lines 3-3 of Figure l;

Figure 4 is the same sectional view as shown in Figure 3, but showing the lateral adjustment of the reticule;

Figure 5 is a sectional view similar to that of Figures 3 and 4, but showing a vertical adjustment of the reticule;

Figure 6 is a sectional view taken along the lines 6-6 of Figure l;

Figure 7 is a sectional view taken along the lines 7-7 of Figure 1; and

Figure 8 is a sectional view taken along the lines 8 8 of Figure 1.

Returning now to the drawings, more particularly to Figure l, wherein like reference symbols indicate the same parts throughout the various views, 1 indicates the telescopic sight of this invention which has an objective end 2 and an ocular end 3. The sight comprises a cylindrical casing 4 mounted upon a base 5, which is attached to a frame 6, The frame 6 is in turn mounted upon the barrel of the gun.

An objective mounting member 7 having an inner end 8 and an outer end 9 is rotatably mounted Within the ICC casing 4 with the outer end 9 protruding outwardly of the objective end of the telescope. The objective member has a lens system 10 mounted in the outer end thereof. A driving member 11 is fastened to the inner end 8 of the objective member. There is an annular groove 12 extending around the driving member 11. There are two spaced projections 13 mounted in the groove 12, which engage an annular dog 14 positioned within the groove 12. The projections 13 and the annular dog 14 correspond to the projections 25 and dog 26 shown in Figure 7 and coact to limit the rotary movement of the objective member. A series of notches 15 are provided in an annular band on the driving member 11 on each side of the annular groove 12.

The inner end of the driving member 11 has a recess 16 which is eccentrically positioned with respect to the center line of the driving member. The recess is circular in shape and houses a ring 17 which is rotatable therein. The ring 17 is `biased outwardly of the driving member by an annular spring 18 and has a pair of axial projections 19.

Rotatably mounted to the ocular end 3 of the telescopic sight is an ocular member 20 which has an inner end 21 and an outer end 22, the latter of which projects outwardly of the ocular end of the sight. The ocular member 20 is similar in construction to the objective member 7 and comprises a lens system 23 adjacent the outer end thereof. There is an annular groove 24 extending about the ocular member and there are a pair of projections 25 in the groove which are engageable with an annular dog 26 mounted upon the inner face of the casing and received within the annular groove 24. The projections 25 and the annular dog 26 also coact to limit the rotary movement of the ocular member.

A driving member 27 is secured to the inner end 2l of the ocular member and has an eccentrically located circular recess 28 which houses a ring 29 rotatably positioned therein. The ring 29 is also urged outwardly of the driving member by an annular spring 30 and has a pair of axial projections 31. Notches 32 are circumferentially arranged around the driving member 27.

The above described structure of the objective and ocular members is all directed to transmitting a rotary movement from the outer ends of each of these members to the reticule adjusting mechanism located between the driving members of the objective and ocular members. The reticule adjusting mechanism comprises a slide 33 which is slidably mounted for linear vertical movement in vertical guides 34. The slide 33 has a horizontally extending groove 35 which receives the axial projections 31 of the ocular member. The other end of the slide 33 comprises opposed horizontal inner guide tracks 36 and outer guide tracks 37 which overhang the guide tracks 36.

A second slide 38 is slidably mounted within guide tracks 36 and 37 of the slide 32 and is limited to a linear horizontal movement by these guide tracks. Also the overhanging outer guide 37 limits the axial movement of the slide 38 in the direction of the objective end of the telescope.

A reticule 39 having cross-hairs 40 is mounted in the slide 38. The end of the slide 38 remote from the reticule has a vertically extending groove 41 which receives the axial projections 19 of the objective member.

Locking means are provided to restrain movement of the reticule in either the horizontal or vertical directions once the reticule has been adjusted. The locking means for the objective member 7 comprises a pair of detents 42 which are mounted in the base 5 and are biased outwardly by a spring 43. The detents 42 engage the notches 15 on the driving member of the objective member. Similarly detents 44 are mounted in the base 5 and are urged outwardly by a spring 45 to engage in notches 32 which are circumferentially arranged on the driving member 27 of the ocular member.

There is a scale 46 on the outer surface of the casing 4 adjacent the outer end 22 of the ocular member. This scale indicates height or range. There is a similar scale 47 adjacent the outer end of the objective member to indicate lateral deviation which may be necessary in correcting for windage.

In order to obtain a horizontal adjustment or lateral displacement of the reticule 39 the objective member 7 is rotated. During this rotation of the objective member the ring 17 makes a circular movement but only the horizontal component thereof is transmitted to the slide 38. While the ring 17 rotates Within the recess 16 the axial projections 19 Will remain in vertical alignment and will bear against the edges of the vertical grooves 41 of the slide 38 to move the slide horizontally. The slide is restrained against any vertical movement by the horizontal guides 36 and 37. The effects of this horizontal adjustment to the reticule may be clearly seen by comparing Figures 3 and 4.

To obtain a vertical adjustment of the reticule the outer end of the ocular member Z is rotated. This rotary movement will cause the ring 29 to rotate within the recess 2S. The vertical displacement of the ring 29 by the movement of the eccentrically located recess 28 is translated `into a vertical movement of the slide 33 by the action of the axial projections 31 against the edges of the horizontal groove 35. The slide 33 is restrained against any horizontal movement by the vertical guides 34. The vertical movement of the slide 33 is transmitted to the slide 38 by the horizontal guides 36 and 37. As a result the reticule 39 is moved vertically guided by the action of the axial projections 19 in the vertical groove 41 of the slide 38.

Thus it can be seen that the present invention provides a telescopic sight wherein the reticule is independently adjustable in either the vertical or horizontal directions by the action of the adjusting members which are cornponents of the telescopic sight and which do not project outwardly from the casing so as to mar the appearance of the sight. With the adjusting mechanism of this invention there is no necessity for coordinating the horizontal and vertical adjustments since each adjustment is independent of the other. As a result the adjustments may be made separately or concurrently. Furthermore, the adjustments are not susceptible to any external influence since the adjusting mechanisms are automatically locked in position by a locking mechanism. The locking mechanism however does not interfere in any way with the manipulation of the adjusting members.

It will be understood that this invention is susceptible to modification in order to adapt it to different usages and conditions and, accordingly, it is desired to comprehend such modications within this invention as may fall within the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1.7Ina telescopic sight, a rotatable ocular mounting at one end of said telescopic sight, a rotatable objective .ffmounting at the other end of said telescopic sight, there Cil recess having axial projections, a second slide slidably mounted in said iirst slide for linear movement at right angles to said iirst slide, said second slide having a groove receiving said last-mentioned axial projections whereby a rotary movement of said objective mounting imparts a linear movement to said second slide, and a reticule mounted in said second slide whereby rotary movement of said mountings will be translated to linear movements of said reticule at right angles to each other for adjusting said reticule.

2. In a telescopic sight, a cylindrical casing, a rst adjusting member rotatably mounted within said casing with the outer end thereof projecting outwardly of one end of said casing, there being an eccentrically located recess in the inner end of said rst adjusting member, a ring rotatably Vmounted in said recess and having axial projections, a rst slide guided for linear movement within said casing, there being a groove on said slide for receiving said axial projections whereby rotational end of said casing, there being an eccentrically located recess in the inner end of said second adjusting member, a ring rotatably mounted in said recess and having axial projections, a second slideslidably mounted in said first slide for linear movement at right angles to the movement of said rst slide, there being a groove in said second slide for receiving said last-mentioned axial projections whereby rotary movement of said second adjusting member will impart-a linear movement to said second slide, and a reticule mounted in said second slide whereby the independent linear movements of said slides will position said reticule. i

3. In a telescopic sight, a cylindrical casing, an ocular mounting at one end of said casing, an objective mounting at the other end of said casing, there being an eccentrically located recess in the inner end of said ocular mounting, a ring rotatably mounted in said recess and having axial projections thereon, a iirst slide mounted for linear movement in said sight, said first slide having a. groove receiving said axial projections whereby rotary movement of said ocular mounting imparts a linear movement to said iirst slide, said objective mounting having an eccentrically located recess in the inner end thereof, a ring rotatably mounted in said recess and having axial projections, a second slide slidably mounted in said rst slide for linear movement at right angles to said first slide, said second slide having a groove receiving said last-mentioned axial projections whereby a rotary movement of said objective mounting imparts a linear movement to said second slide, a reticule mounted in said second slide whereby rotary movement of said mountings will be translated to linear movements of said reticule at right angles to each other for adjusting said reticule, and a scale on each end of said casing adjacent said rotatable mountings whereby the range may be read on one scale and the lateral deviation on the other scale.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 736,541 Peterson Aug. 18, 1903 1,088,137 Fidjeland Feb. 24, 1914 2,078,858 Kuhn Apr. 27, 1937 2,427,516 Unertl et al Sept. 16, 1947 2,479,789 Street Aug. 23, 1949 FOREIGN PATENTS 243,141 Switzerland Dec. 2, 1946

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US736541 *Nov 21, 1902Aug 18, 1903Axel W PetersonMeans for adjusting cross-hairs of telescopic sights.
US1088137 *Jun 6, 1913Feb 24, 1914 Cross-wire frame for firearm sighting-telescopes.
US2078858 *Feb 8, 1935Apr 27, 1937Lyman Gun Sight CorpTelescope sight
US2427516 *Jul 15, 1944Sep 16, 1947Unertl JohnAdjustable reticule for telescopes
US2479789 *Mar 9, 1945Aug 23, 1949Bausch & LombAdjustable reticle
CH243141A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3510192 *Aug 3, 1965May 5, 1970David P BushnellTelescope sight
US4403421 *Nov 13, 1980Sep 13, 1983Shepherd Daniel RTelescopic gun sight
US4584776 *Sep 12, 1983Apr 29, 1986Shepherd Daniel RTelescopic gun sight
US6868615 *May 5, 2003Mar 22, 2005Paul Joseph MalleyTelescopic weapon aiming system
US8353454May 14, 2010Jan 15, 2013Horus Vision, LlcApparatus and method for calculating aiming point information
US8656630Jun 9, 2011Feb 25, 2014Horus Vision LlcApparatus and method for aiming point calculation
US8701330Jan 2, 2012Apr 22, 2014G. David TubbBallistic effect compensating reticle and aim compensation method
US8707608Jul 30, 2012Apr 29, 2014Horus Vision LlcApparatus and method for calculating aiming point information
Classifications
U.S. Classification356/247, 42/122, 359/424
International ClassificationG02B27/32
Cooperative ClassificationG02B27/32
European ClassificationG02B27/32