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Publication numberUS2891538 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 23, 1959
Filing dateJul 21, 1955
Priority dateJul 21, 1955
Publication numberUS 2891538 A, US 2891538A, US-A-2891538, US2891538 A, US2891538A
InventorsWilliam N Moxley
Original AssigneeWilliam N Moxley
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Massage chair
US 2891538 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 2.3, 1959 W- N MOXLEY 2,891,538

MASSAGE CHAIR Filed July 2l, 1955 0 54]; j E0. dlr

United States Patent MASSAGE CHAIR William N. Moxley, Los Angeles, Calif.

AMpplication July 21, 1955, Serial No. 523,523

11 Claims. (Cl; 12S-33) embodyingl a` massage or vibrationY producing unit, inl

which the massagingaction of the unit is transmitted, with a "highdegree of effectiveness, to thev lower regions of-thebackof the person seated in the chair, aswell as Vto.

other desirable regions of the persons back and body.

"jA further object of the invention is to provide a chair containing` anirnproved supporting structure for securing the massageunitito the chair, in order that a massaging action will be. imparted to variousv regions ofthe ,chair and to the body of the person seated thereon.

'This invention possesses many other advantages, and has other objects which may be made more clearly apparent from a consideration of a form in which it may be embodied. Tlhis form is shown in the drawings accompanying and'forming part' ofthe present specification. It willnow 'be described in detail, for the purpose of illustrating the general principles of the invention; but Yit is to lbe understood that' such detailed description is .not to be taken in-a limiting sense, since the scopeof the invention is best d'e'finedby the appended claims.

,'Referring to the drawings:

'Figure 1 is a side elevational and vertical sectional view through a chair embodying the invention;

Pig. 2 'is a 'bottom plan view of the chair disclosed in Fig. 1';

.Fig v3 is an enlarged sectional and' elevational view taken generally along the line 3-3 on Fig. Y1.

Asdisclosed in, the drawings, the invention is incorporated fina .chair having a seat and a back portion 11, as wellY as spaced arm rests or arm portions 12 at the chair sides. The chair includes a frame that may be made of wood orsimilar rigid material, this frame including a front Aportion 13 Va rear portion 1'4, 14a, Vand intervening side,por.tions 15. ,appropriately .secured to the rear andv .front portions 14, 13. Feetl, adapted to rest upon the door, may be secured at the bottom of the frame at thefour corners of the chair.

Theback A11 .of .the chair may extend `upwardly from the-rear 14, 14a of the frame,.or from the portion 14a of the chair that may be disposed forwardly of the rear end 14 of the frame. As disclosed inthe drawings, the rear. :of .the-.frameI may .include the vertical. portion 14 from which theforward horizontal `portion Y14a extends. Tlhe specic structure of Vthe frame rear, however, may be changed', vdepending vupon the character of the chair. As an example, the back 11 of the chair may be 'lixed with respect to the frame, or it may be adjustably mounted i CL with respect thereto, in order to allow the back to be dis.- posed in the upright position disclosed, or to be tilted 'backward to a partial or fully reclining position. Similarly, the front 13 of the frame, or at least a part thereof, may be lixed or may be adjustably mounted so as to swing upwardly to provide a support for th-e'legs `of the. person seated in the chair.

The back 11 of the chair, as well as the seat 10', front portion 17 and arm portions 12 are padded, preferably through the use of foam rubber, that bears ,against the frame structure. A suitable covering material 18 is `disposed over the foam rubber, as is usual in upholstered or padded chairs.

It is desired to impart a massaging action to regions of the body of a person seated in the chair, the massaging or vibrating action being transmitted through the frame of the chair, and through the rubber or rubber-like padding material, to the persons body. The unit 19 for imparting the massaging or vibratory action to the persons body is secured to the lbottom portion of the frame. It is carried on a steel sub-frame 20 secured to the side and rear portions 15, 14a of the chair frame.

The sub-frame 20 specifically disclosed in the drawings is of angle iron construction. It includes a rear angle iron member 21 attached to the rear frame portion 14a, as by means of vertically disposed screws 22 extending upwardly through the horizontal flange 23 of the rear member `21v into the rear portion of the frame, and also by horizontal screws '24 extending through the vertical flange 25 and threaded into the wooden frame 14a. As is evident from the drawings, the horizontal flange 23 engages the undersurface of the wood frame member 14a, whereas the vertical flange engages the front of the rear wood frame member 14a. A vertical intermedia-te frame member 26 may be Vdisposed immediately above the angle iron frame 21, extending upwardly to the padded seat portion 10 of the chair.

The sub-frame also includes forwardly disposed side members .27, the lower flanges 2S of which engage the lower surfaces of the side frame members 15, and the vertical iianges 29 of which engage the inner surfaces of the side frame members 15. The flanges 28, 29 are secured to the wooden side frame members 15 by screws 30 passing through the anges and threaded into the side frame members.

Disposed between and integral with the rear member 21 and the side members 27 of the sub-frame 2t) are diagonal members 31. These diagonal members 31 also have horizontal and vertical anges 32, 33. Actually, ,the forward members 27 of the sub-frame 20, the diagonal members 31 and the rear member 21 may be made integral merely by notching the horizontal flange of an angle iron, and by then bending the vertical flanges at the points of juncture between the rear member 21 and the diagonal members 31, and also between the diagonal members and the forward members 27.

An angle iron cross-piece member 34 is secured to and between the diagonal members 31 between the rear member 21 and the forward members 27, as by use of welding material 35, This cross member 34 includes a horizontal ange 36 and a vertical llange 37, the horizontal flange being substantially coplanar with the other horizontal flanges of the sub-frame. The cross-piece is disposed at a particular location along the diagonal members 31, preferably being arranged substantially parallel to the rear member 21 of the sub-frame. The cross-piece is disposed at a particular location, to appropriately position the massage unit 19, which is secured by bolts 38, or the like, to the horizontal flange 36 of the cross-piece. The Vmassage unit 19 is adapted to impart a massaging or vibrating action to the sub-frame 20, which is transmitted from the Vsub-frame tothe wooden frame members `14, 14a, 13, y15

of the chair, and from the latter to the various padded regions of the chair.

The massage unit 19 specifically disclosed includes an electric motor 40 of any suitable type having its armature shaft 41 extending through and suitably secured to an eccentric 42, which is caused to rotate by the armature shaft. This eccentric d2 is secured within an inner race 43 carrying a set of ball bearing ele-ments d4, which engage an outer race to which a plurality ot circumferentially spaced rubber inserts or segments 46 are secured, these rubber segments in turn being secured to the inner portion of a bearing support i7 integral with, or otherwise suitably secured to, an arm 4? extending transversely of the axis of the apparatus. The arm dll is integral with a shoe plate 49 disposed outwardly of the motor and generally parnllc to the @exis of rotation of the armature shaft 41. The shoe plate extends lenghwise of the motor, its other end being integral with an inwardlyv extending arm d, which is, in turn, integral with a cross member 51, to which the end of the motor frame remote from the eccentric is secured through the agency of a llexiblc coupling. The flexible coupling includes a plurality of oars 52, of fiber o-r other llexible material, secured to a frame flange 53 by screws 54, or the like, the flexible bars also being attached by screws 55 to the cross member 51.

If desired, a suitable cover member 56 may be placed over the bearing support 47, being secured thereto by screws 57, or the like. Similarly, another cover member 58 may be placed over the cross member 51 to ho-use the flexible coupling 52, being suitably secured to the cross member 51 by screws, or the like. This last-mentioned cup-shaped cover member 5S may have an axial opening 59 in its end wall through which an electric line 60 leading from the motor di) can pass. The other end of the line 60 is connected to a switch and rheostat 61 to which an electric cord or lino 62, is connected. This line 62 has a plu-g at its terminus for insertion in a suitable electric outlet or socket (not shown). The switch and rheostat 61 may be suitably supported on the exterior portion of one of the side arm sections 12 for easy manipulation by a person seated within the chair.

The massage or vibratory unit 19 is secured to the horizontal flange of the cross-piece 3d and substantially midway along its length, with the axis of rotation of the armature shaft disposed substantially parallel to the cross-piece 34 and to the rear member 21 of the subframe 2t). Thus, the shoe plate i9 is secured to the hori- Zontal ange of the cross-piece by the spaced bolts 38 to locate the unit in the relative position just described. As the motor rtl rotates, the eccentric 4Z mounted thereon will produce a gyratory or vibratory action upon the arms 4S, 50 and the shoe plate 419, which is transmitted to the cross-piece 34, and through the latter to the remainder of the sub-frame Ztl. From the rear 21 and forward portions 27 of the sub-frame, the vibratory action is transmitted to the wooden frame structure 13, 14, 14a, 15, 26, or other frame structure, of the chair. he massaging action, which is actually in the form of a circular motion, is imparted through the sponge rubber or other pliant, elastic padding of the seat 1t) to the body of the person on the seat, as well as through the front 17 of the chair to the persons legs. lt is also transmitted through the foam rubber padding to the arms of the person resting upon the arm portions i2 of thc chair, and through the back 11 of the chair to the persons back, shoulder blades and neck.

The massage unit 19 is located in a particular position in the bottom frame structure Ztl, which, it is found, will eflectively transmit the massaging action substantially uniformly throughout the entire chair structure. it is found that the spacing of the cross-piece 34 and the location of the massage unit 19 from the rear member 21 of the sub frame and rear chair portion 14a, a distance which is approxiniately 30 percent of the distance between the rear member 14a and the front frame 13 of the chair, an elective and substantially uniform massaging action is imparted to all parts of the chair. The substantial uniformity in the transmission of the massaging action throughout the chair is retained if the above percentage is varied by about 5 percent. Thus, if the distance of the cross-piece 34 in the massage unit from the rear member 14a is 25 percent to 35 percent of the distance from the rear member 14a to the front frame member 13 of the chair, an eiective massaging action is transmitted throughout the chair, although if the above distance is the 30 percent value previously described, the transmission is most effective and efficient. Variations from the value of the 30 percent given above to a greater extent than 5 percent will reduce the effectiveness of the vibration transmission attached to the chair. As an example, if the vibration unit 19 is mounted on the frame too close to the rear member 14a, then the vibrations will be imparted predominantly to the back portion 11 of the chair and will be considerably reduced at the front portion 17 of the chair. Similarly, if the cross-piece 34 and massage unit 19 are disposed substantially forward of the chair, then the massaging action will predominate at the forward portion of the chair, and will not be transmitted effectively to the back portion 11 of the chair.

It is, accordingly, evident that the critical location of the cross-piece 34 and the massage unit 19 at the place indicated in the frame structure 13, 14, 14a, 15 produces effective transmission of the massage action throughout the chair. Moreover, the particular sub-frame 20 illustrated is economical to manufacture, providing a simple and eiective manner of properly mounting and locating the massage unit 19 on the chair structure.

The padded back of the chair is specifically designed to impart effective massaging action to the dilerent regions of a persons back, shoulders and neck. In effect, the padded back part of the chair is divided into three sections 11a, 11b, 11e. Thus, a lower section 11a that is convex in a forward direction is adapted to engage the lower portion of the persons back seated in the chair. The intermediate convex section 11b is adapted to engage the upper portion of the back, and the uppermost convex section 11C is adapted to engage the persons neck, and also the persons shoulders. It is found that a more effective massaging action is imparted to the rear of the persons body, and extending from the back to the neck, if the curvature of the upper section 11C is made relatively abrupt, the curvature being much sharper and pronounced than if the curvature were made to lie upon a circle. The curvature at the bottom portion 11a of the chair back also does not lie on a circle, the extent of its curvature being much atter than the curvature of the upper portion 11C of the chair. The intermediate portion 11b of the chair back has a relatively flat curvature.

With the particular back curvatures described and shown, the lower portion 11a of the chair back is adapted to lit electively within the small of a persons back, while the intermediate portion 11b is shaped to effectively fit the major length of the back, running up to the persons neck. The uppermost portion 11C of the chair is designed to appropriately fit against the persons neck, with the lower surface 11d of the upper portion 11e being adapted to engage the persons shoulders. The contour of the chair back 11 provides a relatively snug engagement between the lower section 11a with the lower portion of the persons back, the intermediate section 11b with the upper portion of the persons back, and the upper section 11e with the persons neck and shoulder area.

The inventor claims:

1. 1n chair apparatus: a chair base frame including front, rear and side members secured together; a seat and back supported by said frame, said back extending upwardly from said frame with its lower portion adjacent the rear of said seat, said seat and hack each including a layer of pliant, elastic material;` a bottom frame secured` to the rear and' side members of said chair basev 'frame;,rrotatable vibration producing means secured" to said bottom framewith its rotational' axis substantially-parallel tjo saidl yfront and rear members; said rotationalv axis being spaced Vfrom said rear member from Z vpercent to3`5 percentof the distance between said 'front' andy rear members.

2L 'Inchair apparatus: a chair 'base frame including front, rear andl side members securedtogether; ,a` seat and back supported'by said frame, saidback extending upwardly from said-frame with itslower portion adjacent the rear of'said seat, said'seat and back each including a layer of pliant; elasticmaterial; abottom frame secured to.v the rear and side members of said chair base Vframe; rotatable. vibration producing means secured to saidv bottom .frame wit-h its rotational'axis substantially p arallel to said kf'ro'rit and' rear members; said'rotational axis being spaced from said rea'r member labout VSlT-percentof the distance between said frontandrear members.

3. In chair apparatus: a chair frame including front, rear and side members secured together; a seat and back supported by said frame, said seat and back each including a layer of pliant, elastic material; a bottom frame including a rear section secured to said rear member, forward sections secured to said side members, diagonal sections extending between and secured to said rear and forward sections, and a cross-section substantially parallel to said rear section and extending between and secured to said diagonal sections; and rotatable vibration producing means secured to said cross-section with its rotational axis substantially parallel to said rear section.

4. In chair apparatus: a chair frame including front, rear and side members secured together; a seat and back supported by said frame, said seat and back each including a layer of pliant, elastic material; a bottom frame including a rear section secured to said rear member, forward sections secured to said side member-s, diagonal sections extending between and secured to said rear and forward sections, and a cross-section substantially parallel to said rear section and extending between and secured to said diagonal sections; and rotatable vibration producing means secured to said cross-section with its rotational axis substantially parallel to said rear section; said rotational axis being spaced from said rear member from 25 percent to 35 percent of the distance between said front and rear members.

5. In chair apparatus: a chair base frame including front, rear and side members secured together, all of said members being substantially horizontal; a seat and back supported by said frame, said back extending upwardly from said frame with its lower portion adjacent the rear of said seat, said seat and back each including a layer of pliant, elastic material against which a persons body can rest; said back comprising a lower forwardly facing convex portion adapted to engage the lower region of a persons back, an intermediate forwardly facing convex portion adapted to engage the upper region of a persons back, and an upper forwardly facing convex portion adapted to engage a persons neck; a bottom frame secured to said chair base frame; rotatable vibration producing means secured to said bottom frame with its rotational axis substantially parallel to said front and rear members; said rotational axis being spaced from said rear member from 25 percent to 35 percent of the distance between said front and rear members.

6. In chair apparatus: a chair frame including front, rear and side members secured together; a seat and back supported by said frame, said seat and back each including a layer of pliant, elastic material against which a persons body can rest; said back comprising a lower forwardly facing convex portion adapted to engage the lower region of a persons back, an intermediate forwardly facing convex portion adapted to engage the upperregionofa persons `back,.and an upper forwardly,y facing.A convex portion 4adaptedto engage a persons neck;

the. lcurvature of 'said`I lower portion being substantially morepronounced than saidintermediate portion, and thef curvature ofthe `upper portion being substantially morepronounced tlian said lower portion; a bottom frame secured to said chair frame; rotatable vibration producing meanssecured'to .saidfbottom frame with its rotational'.

including alayer of pliant,V elastic material against which a persons 'body can rest; said backv Vcomprisinga lower forwardly facing convex portion adaptedV to engage the lower. region of the persons back, an Vintermediate forwardly facingv convex' portion adaptedl to engage kthe upper region of a persons back, and an upper forwardly facing convex portion adapted to engage the persons neck; a bottom frame including a rear section secured to said rear member, forward sections secured to said side members, diagonal sections extending between and secured to said rear and forward sections, and a crosssection substantially parallel to said rear section and extending between and secured to said diagonal sections; and rotational vibration producing means secured to said cross-section with its rotational axis substantially parallel to said rear section.

8. In chair apparatus: a chair frame including front, rear and side members secured together; a seat and back supported by said frame, said seat and back each including a layer of pliant, elastic material against which a persons body can rest; said back comprising a lower forwardly facing convex portion adapted to engage the lower region of the persons back, an intermediate forwardly facing convex portion adapted to engage the upper region of a persons back, and an upper forwardly facing convex portion adapted to engage the persons neck, the curvature of said lower portion being substan tially more pronounced than said intermediate portion, and the curvature of said upper portion being substantially more pronounced than said lower portion; a bottom frame including a rear section secured to said rear member, forward sections secured to said side mem bers, diagonal sections extending between and secured to said rear and forward sections, and a cross-section substantially parallel to said rear section and extending between and secured to said diagonal sections; and rotational vibration producing means secured to said crosssection with its rotational axis substantially parallel to said rear section.

9. In chair apparatus: a generally rectangular chair base frame including front, rear and side members secured together; feet adapted to engage a floor secured to the four corners of said frame; a seat and back supported by said frame, said back extending upwardly from said frame with its lower portion adjacent the rear of said seat, said seat and back each including a layer of pliant, elastic material; a bottom frame secured to the rear and side members of said chair base frame; rotational vibration producing means secured to said bottom frame with its rotational axis substantially horizontal and parallel to said front and rear members; said rotational axis being spaced from said rear member from 25 percent to 35 percent of the distance between said front and rear members.

10. In chair apparatus: a generally rectangular chair base frame including front, rear and side members secured together; feet adapted to engage a floor secured to the four corners of said frame; a seat and back supported by said frame, said back extending upwardly from said frame with its lower portion adjacent the rear of said seat, said seat and back each including a layer of plaint, elastic material; a bottom frame secured to the rear and side members of said Chair base frame; rotational vibration producing means secured to said bottom frame with its rotational axis substantially horizontal and parallel to said front and rear members; said rotational axis being spaced from said rear member about 30 percent of the distance between said front and rear members.

11. In chair apparatus: a generally rectangular chair base frame including front, rear and side members secured together; feet adapted to engage a floor secured to the four corners of said frame; a seat and back supported by said frame, said back extending upwardly from said frame with its lower portion adjacent the rear of 15 said seat, said seat and back each including a layer of pliant, elastic material against which a persons body can rest; said back comprising a lower forwardly facing convex portion adapted to engage the lower region of the persons back, an intermediate forwardly facing convex portion adapted to engage the upper region of the persons back, and an upper forwardly facing convex portion adapted to engage the persons neck; a bottom frame secured to said chair base frame; rotational vibration producing means secured to said bottom frame with its rotational axis substantially parallel to said front and rear members; said rotational axis being spaced from said rear member from 25 percent to 35 percent of the distance between said front and rear members.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,615,615 Cannon lan. 25, 1927 2,427,053 Hampton Sept. 9, 1947 2,587,207 Peterson Feb. 26, 1952 2,595,272 Kost May 6, 1952 2,715.901 Blake Aug. 23, 1955

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1615615 *Mar 10, 1924Jan 25, 1927Michael P CannonVibrating chair
US2427053 *Sep 16, 1946Sep 9, 1947H F T CompanyCombination chair and table for body massaging and muscle manipulation
US2587207 *Feb 3, 1948Feb 26, 1952Dorothy M PetersonTherapeutic vibrator
US2595272 *May 21, 1947May 6, 1952Kost Multiple X IncMechanical chair
US2715901 *Aug 2, 1954Aug 23, 1955Oliver P BlakeVibrating contour chair
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4920583 *Jun 10, 1985May 1, 1990Hough Thomas WVibrating toilet seat
US4921247 *Aug 11, 1986May 1, 1990Sterling Joseph FExercise chair
US5836645 *Nov 21, 1996Nov 17, 1998Matsushita Electric Works, Ltd.Lounger-type massage machine
US6056357 *Sep 23, 1996May 2, 2000Yukihiko SaitohApparatus for vibrating seats
Classifications
U.S. Classification601/56
International ClassificationA61H1/00, A61H23/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61H2201/1623, A61H2201/0149, A61H2201/1628, A61H2205/081, A61H23/0254, A61H2205/086
European ClassificationA61H23/02R