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Publication numberUS2892399 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 30, 1959
Filing dateDec 19, 1955
Priority dateDec 19, 1955
Publication numberUS 2892399 A, US 2892399A, US-A-2892399, US2892399 A, US2892399A
InventorsWalter Chase Corson
Original AssigneeMiehle Goss Dexter Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Socket for ink roller
US 2892399 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jime 30, 1959 9 c. w. CHASE 2,892,399 SOCKET FOR INK ROLLER Filed Dec. 19, 1955 s Sheets-Sheet 1 In ventor:

Co son base y%% //'s At 'or eys June so, 1959 c. w. C HASE 2,892,399

I SOCKET FOR INK ROLLER Filed Dec. 19, 1955 s Shee ts-Shqet 2 1n veh tori- Co son Chase, y fiw b His Attorn 3 June 30, 1959 c. w. CHASE 2,892,399 SOCKET FOR INK ROLLER Filed Dec. 19, 1955 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 in v-e 7') ton- Cor'on Chase,

United States Patent Ofilice SOCKET FOR INK ROLLER Application December 19, 1955, Serial No. 553,929 8 Claims. (Cl. 101-349) The present invention relates to printing presses and more particularly a socket for adjustably mounting an ink roller relative to a pair of ink cylinders.

It is 'an object of the present invention to provide a socket for an ink roller for transferring an ink film between a spaced pair of ink cylinders and which is capable of applying predetermined forces to the cylinders within a wide operating range.

It is a related object to provide an ink roller socket which is capable of resiliently applying predetermined forces to a pair of ink cylinders but which need not be oriented in a particular direction with respect to the cylinders. More specifically, an ink roller socket in which the total resultant force may not only be varied in magnitude but may be applied along a range of desired direction. In one of the embodiments of the device the resultant force may be applied in any direction i.e., through a full 360.

It is another object of the invention to provide an improved socket for an ink roller which permits precise proportioning of the forces exerted upon two cooperating ink cylinders, which is convenient to adjust, and which does not require time-consuming readjustment when a new roller having a slightly different diameter is substituted. It is a related object to provide an ink roller socket w 'ch does not have to be readjusted to compensate for progressive changes in the diameter of the roller which occur due to changes in temperature and absorption of ink.

It is a further object of the present invention to employ an improved socket for an ink roller which has novel adjusting means enabling the roller to be brought to bear resiliently and with predetermined or proportioned force against two spaced ink cylinders and which may be readily modified for positive positioning of the roller over a relatively wide range and in any desired direction.

In one of its aspects it isan object of the invention to provide a roller socket which is particularly well-adapted for use with an ink transfer roller but which is nevertheless capable of being used almost universally in a printing press for mounting the various ink rollers and ink cylinders or drums.

It is another object of the invention to provide an ink roller socket of the above type which permits rollers to be readily substituted without having to work against the resilient forces of the adjusting mechanism. More specifically, it is an object to provide means for locking the roller socket in a desired position relative to the frame prior to removal of a roller, the looking means being released for resumption of the resilient pressures after a new roller is substituted.

It is a generalobject to provide a socket for a printing press roller which is simple and inexpensive to construct and install and which may be readily removed from the press and serviced as a unit.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent upon reading the attached detailed description and upon reference to the drawings, in which:

it is an object to provide order that the .spring. 45 may bear adjustably against the .member and the press frame.

2,892,399 Patented June 30, 1959 Figure 1 is a face view or elevation of an ink roller socket constructed in accordance with the present invention.

Fig. 2 is a top view of the socket shown in Figure 1.

Fig. 3 is a righthand end view of the socket shown in Figure 1. a

Fig. 4 is a righthand end view of a modified construction including springs capable of applying force in either tension or compression. 4

Fig. 5 is a diagrammatic perspective of the socket shown in Figs. l-3 for the purpose of understanding the operation of the device.

Fig. 6 is a vector diagram showing a typical operating condition of the device shown in Figs. 1-3.

Fig. 7 is a vector diagram showing the range of force and direction which may be obtained in the alternative embodiment of Fig. 4.

Fig. 8 is a diagrammatic perspective showing the means used to lock the socket in position while changing rollers.

Figs. 8a'and 8b are fragments showing the locking lever in its released and engaged conditions respectively.

While the invention has been described in connection with certain preferred embodiments, it will be understood that I do not intend to limit the invention to such embodiments but intend to cover all modifications, alternative constructions and uses which are included within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

Turning now to Figs. l-3 there is shown a socket assembly 10 mounted on the frame 11 of a printing press and mounting a roller 12. The roller 12 has a shaft 13 which is journaled in an anti-friction bearing 14. The roller assembly is mounted on the inside surface of one of the press frame plates, and it will be understood that the other end of the roller is mounted in a corresponding socket assembly which may, if desired, be the mirror image of that which is to be described. In the present assembly it will be assumed that the roller- 12 bears against a pair of ink cylinders 21, 22 having centers of rotation 23, 24, respectively.

In carrying out the present invention the socket assembly 10 includes a base member 30 which is mounted for limited rocking movement on the press frame to provide a lateral adjustment of the roller 12 on one direction togetherwith a socket member 31 which is movably mounted on the base member to provide lateral adjustment of the roller in another direction. As'will be seen the two movements may be coordinated so that the roller exerts a resultant force having a direction and magnitude which may be varied over a wide range.

Referring more specifically to the base member 30, it will be noted that itis arcuately shaped having a central recess, 32, a first end 33, a second end or lip 34, .and aflat mounting face 35'which is seated but slidable on the press frame 11. The base member 30 is pivotally mounted with respect to the press frame for limited rocking movement about an axis 36 which is eccentric with respect to the roller axis 15 and parallel thereto. More specifically, the base member is mounted for rotation about a stud 37 which is anchored in the press frame and which projects through a bore 38 formed in the central, i.e., lower, portion of the base member. The base member is retained on the stud by means of a staked washer 39 which is held in place by a machine screw 40.

For the purpose of applying torque to the base member about the pivot axis 36, an adjustment mechanism including a spring is interposed between the end 34 of the base As shown in Fig. 3 the spring, indicated at 45, is seated on an eye-bolt 46 which is secured to the press frame and which projects outwardly therefrom. The spring is kept centered on the eye-bolt by slipping it over the head of a screw 47. In

righthand end or lip 34 of the base member, a set screw 48 is provided which is screwed into the base member and which engages a pilot 49 at the top of the spring 45. It will be understood as the discussion proceeds that the spring 45, acting about the axis 36 as a center, applies a horizontal component of force to the ink roller. Attention will next be given to the socket member 31 which provides a vertical component of force.

For the purpose of adjusting the roller vertically with respect to the base member, and consequently with respect to the press frame, the socket member 31 is of matching arcuate shape, being nested within the arcuate base member yet movable vertically with respect thereto. In the present instance the socket member 31 has a lefthand end 53 which is pivotally mounted on the base member 30 for rotation about an eccentric axis 54 which is parallel to the roller axis. More specifically, a hinge joint is provided between the base member 30 and the socket member 31 which includes a pivot pin 55 maintained in place by a set screw 56 screwed into the base member (Fig. 2). Also hinged on the pin 55 is an armate cap member 60 which is formed to overlie the socket member 31 and which, together with the socket member, defines a central opening 61 for receiving the anti-friction bearing 14 previously referred to. For the purpose of clamping together the camp member 60 and the socket member 31 a clamping screw 62 is provided, the screw being received in the righthand end of the cap member 60 and threaded into the socket member. It will be understood that when the screw 62 is tightened down the cap member and socket member form a rigid unit free to rock upwardly or downwardly about the pivot pin 55 in response to the applied pressure.

In order to adjust the socket member 31 in its path of upward and downward rocking movement, a spring adjustment is interposed between the righthand end of the socket member and the righthand end of the base member. This adjustment includes a compression spring 65 which is mounted below the lip 34 of the base member. The lower end of the spring 65 is coupled to the socket member by means of an elongated adjusting screw 66 which extends centrally within the spring and upwardly through an aperture 67 provided in the lip 34 of the base member. At the lower end of the adjusting screw 66 is a flanged retainer 68 which is engaged by the end of the spring. The upper end of the adjusting screw is threaded at 69 and is screwed into the lip of the socket member. It will be apparent that expansion of the spring 65, pulling downwardly on the adjusting screw 66, applies a clockwise torque to the socket member about its point of pivoting with the base member, resulting in a downward force being applied to the roller. This component of downward force is adjustable by rotating the adjusting screw 66, just as the horizontal component is adjustable by rotating the adjusting screw 48.

The manner in which the two force components, horizontal and vertical, are combined to provide a net force which is then divided between the two ink cylinders 21, 22, will be apparent upon referring to the diagrams, Figs. and 6. In these figures the horizontal component of force exerted by the spring 45 is indicated vectorially at F The downward component of force exerted by the spring 65 is indicated by the vector F These vectors combine to produce a resultant force vector V which, as shown, is exerted downwardly and to the left. The force of the resultant vector is, of course, divided vectorially between the two ink cylinders 21, 22, the reaction forces being directed along lines which connect the centers 15, 23 and 15, 24, respectively. Thus the force applied by the ink roller 12 against the roller 22 is indicated at P while the force applied against the roller 21 is indicated at P It will be understood that the forces shown are siniply exemplary and, where two identical socket assemblies are used, one at each end of the roller, one-half is applied by each of the assemblies. Since the forces exerted by the springs 45, 65 may be varied from substantially zero to an extremely high value and since such variation may take place independently, it will be apparent that the forces applied to the ink cylinders may be varied independently over wide limits. For springs having a given maximum force, the force vector V may be caused to fall anywhere within the stippled area in Fig. 6. It will be apparent from the foregoing that the socket assembly need not be oriented in any particular way with respect to the cylinders 21, 22. Furthermore, because of the range of movement of the roller axis which the design permits, rollers may be substituted having a diameter which departs substantially from the nominal roller diameter specified as part of the original press design.

In order to provide still further flexibility and to enable the socket assembly to exert a resultant force in any desired direction through a full 360, a two-way or double-acting spring connection is substituted for the single-acting spring connection described above. Such an arrangement as shown in Fig. 4 where corresponding parts, where applicable, are designated by the same reference numerals with the addition of subscript a. Attention will first be given to the spring adjustment which is interposed between the base member 30 and the press frame. The spring 45,, has its upper end anchored to a bushing 75 which is captive in the end of the eye-bolt 46 Centered within the spring is an elongated adjusting screw 76. Pinned to the lower end of the adjusting screw is a retainer 77 which is anchored to the lower end of the spring. The adjusting screw 76 extends upwardly through the bushing 75 and into threaded engagement with a captive nut 78 which rotates in the lip 34, of the base member 30 Also as shown in Fig. 4 a two-way spring connection is provided between the base member and socket member. Here the spring indicated at 65 is anchored at its upper end in a bushing 85. Extending through the bushing is an adjusting screw 86 having a spring retainer 87 pinned to its lower end. For the purpose of adjusting the direction and magnitude of the spring pressure, the upper end of the adjusting screw is threaded into an adjusting nut 88 which is captive in the lip portion of the socket member 31. The upper ends of both of the adjusting screws 76, 86 are squared for applying a wrench so that the adjusting screws may be held in position while the associated adjusting nuts are rotated in one direction or the other. The pitch of the thread is suthciently shallow and the friction is sufli'ciently high so that once the adjustment is achieved it will not be accidentally disturbed by vibration.

The flexibility afforded by the arrangement in Fig. 4 will be apparent to one skilled in the art. In short, each spring is capable of exerting either a push or a pull depending entirely upon the adjustment of the nuts 78, 88 and the relative location of the ink cylinders. Thus when the cylinders are located on the opposite side of the ink roller the adjusting screws are set so that the socket member is pushed upwardly by the spring 65,, and the base is pulled downwardly by the spring 45 producing a resultant force vector lying along the line V' in Fig. 7. The stippled area in the latter figure indicates all possibilities of directions and magnitudes of the resultant force vector, limited only by the maximum compression and expansion forces, F and F which may be achieved by the springs incorporated in the design. Since the resultant force may be applied in any direction whatsoever and at any predetermined magnitude the socket approaches the ultimate in flexibility. It is particularly suitable for use, therefore, as a socket for transfer rollers. Use of the socket simplifies the design of the press since the socket may be oriented in a position determined by symmetry, accessibility for service, ease of removability of rollers and the like quite independently of the relative directions of the two ink cylinders with which the roller is to cooperate. While both springs have been shown as double-acting in the embodiment disclosed in Fig. 4

it will be understood that if desired for special purposes only one of the springs may be madedouble-acting while the other is single-acting as set forth in the earlier embodiment. If this were done it would tend to limit the range of angle of the resultant force vector to 270 rather than the full 360 but the design would still have a degree of flexibility which goes far beyond that of roller sockets conventionally employed.

In accordance with one of the features of the invention, means are provided for holding the socket member in a desired fixed position relative to the frame of the press and to take up the pressure of the springs 45, 65 during the changing of a roller without, however, interfering with the normal response to the springs which occurs under actual operating conditions. This is accomplished in the present embodiment (Figs. 1-3) by an auxiliary cap or locking member 90 which cooperates with a pin 91 mounted on the press frame and extending into the path of movement of the locking member. The locking member 90 is pivoted at one end for scissoring movement relative to the socket member 31. Specifically, as shown in Fig. 2, the locking member is mounted on the rear end of the pivot pin 55 and lies closely adjacent the frame 11 of the press. At its other or righthand end the locking member carries a clamping or take-up screw 92 having an elongated head for easy adjustment and threading into a bracket 93 integrally formed on the socket member. In order to more fully understand the operation of the locking member 90 reference is also made to Figs. 8, 8a and 8b which are diagrammatic. Under normal operating conditions the locking member 90 is backed off into the position shown in Fig. 8a so that there is no interference with the pin 91 and so that the socket is free to assume an equilibrium position in accordance with the pressures exerted by the springs. When it is desired to change rollers the screw 92is tightened to bring the locking member 90 downwardly about its pivot axis into contact with the pin 91 on the printing press frame as shown in Fig. 8b. Following this the bearing cap 60 may be opened by unscrewing the screw 62 and, after this is done at each end of the roller, the roller may be lifted out of the press and a new'roller substituted. After the new roller is placed the bearing caps may be then swung to the closed position and may be securely tightened about the shaft bearing without the necessity of overcoming any spring pressure and without having to disturb the adjustment. Subsequently the screw 92 may be unscrewed to restore the locking member into the backed off position shown in Fig. 8a. A detent spring 94 bearing against the flats on the screw 92 prevents unwanted turning.

In carrying out the invention the locking member is formed with a striking surface 95 which is located at approximately right angles to the direction of the resultant force vector which is indicated at V in Fig. 8b. This tends to reduce the possibility of unwanted sideward slippage of the locking member relative to the pin 91 after contact with the pin is achieved and thus tends to insure that the socket will remain in its exact adjusted position during change of rollers. In short, the pin will not tend to slip relatively downhill on the striking surface as the caps are loosened and as the reaction pressure from the cooperating ink cylinders is relieved. It is, however, one of the features of the present device that the locking member 90 is formed with a notch 95 so that when the screw 92 is tightened beyond the point of Fig. 8b additional relative movement between the notch and pin will tend to occur with the pin finally bottoming in the root of the notch as shown in Fig. 8. This is accompanied by retreating movement of the socket from each of the two ink cylinders so that the roller is drawn back into a reference position out of contact with the ink cylinders. With the reaction pressures thus removed and with the socket effectively locked in position, the roller may be readily removed and replaced without having to exert any take-up force when replacing the cap 60.

The locking mechanism described" thus far is ideally suited for use with the embodiment shown in Figs. 1-3. However, where it is desired to reverse the direction of application of the resultant force, for example, to apply the resultant force in a generally upward direction while keeping the socket oriented as in Figure 1, the locking member must be modified to the extent of providing a striking surface along the top edge rather than the bottom edge of the member and by a reversal in the direction of the thrust exerted by the screw 92.

When initially adjusting the socket construction in accordance with either of the embodiments described above, the adjusting screws are adjusted one by one in a coordinated fashion to produce flats of the desired width on each of the two ink cylinders. This adjustment is not at all diflicult considering that the adjusting screw 48 (or 76) controls the horizontal pressure component while the remaining adjusting screw 69 (or 86) controls the vertical component. Nor is it necessary to repeat the entire adjustment procedure when a new roller is substituted having a slightly different diameter since the change in the width of the fiat will generally be negligible and since the forces will remain in the desired ratio.

While the socket described above has its greatest utility as a socket of the resilient type in which the springs are at all times active, it may be desired, under some circumstances, to convert the device to one of the rigid type in which the adjustments control the position rather than the pressure and in which dependence is placed upon the resilience of the rubber. Thus it will be apparent that the invention is not to be considered limited to the spring arrangement shown but would cover substitution of the springs by rigid tubular members, or equivalent, having the same nominal dimensions and supported and anchored in the same manner as the springs disclosed.

The present socket construction is equally useful for mounting metal drums or cylinders in a printing press. Consequently, in the claims which follow the term roller is used in a generic sense to mean a cylindrical rotating element regardless of whether such element is rubber surfaced or hard surfaced.

I claim as my invention: a

1. In a socket assembly for a roller in a printing press for holding the same in engagement with a pair of cylinders, the combination comprising a base member having a pivot arranged parallel to the axis of the roller and spaced therefrom, a socket member mounted on the base member for rotation about an axis which is parallel to the axis of the first pivot and spaced therefrom, a first adjusting means interposed between the base member and the frame of the printing press and having a resilient element for continuous application of resilient force tending to adjust the force exerted by the roller in a first transaxial direction, and a second adjusting means interposed between the base member and the socket member and having a resilient element for continuous application of a second resilient force tending to adjust the force exerted by the roller in a second transaxial direction.

2. In a socket assembly for a roller in a printing press for holding the same in engagement with a pair of cylinders, the combination comprising a base member having a pivot arranged parallel to the axis of the roller and spaced therefrom, a socket member mounted on the base member for rotation about an axis which is parallel to the axis of the first pivot and spaced therefrom by approximately right angles relative to the roller axis, a first spring interposed between the base member and the frame and the printing press for transaxial adjustment of the roller along a first line of movement, and a second spring interposed between the base member and the socket member for transaxial adjustment of the roller along a second line of movement, said springs having provision for independent adjustment for varying the relative pressures applied to said cylinders.

3. In a socket assembly for mounting a roller in a printing press and for holding the same in engagement with a pair of cylinders, the combination comprising a base member having a pivot which is offset in a first direction from the roller axis for pivotally mounting the same on the frame of the printing press for rocking movement about an axis parallel to the roller axis, a socket member for rotatably mounting the end of the roller, said socket member having a pivot which is offset from the roller axis at generally right angles from said first direction for mounting the socket member on said base member for rocking movement of the socket member in a direction at generally right angles to the rocking movement of the base member, a first adjustable spring interposed between the base member and the frame of the printing press and a second adjustable spring interposed between the socket member and the base member for adjustment of the direction and magnitude of the resultant pressure exerted by said roller on said cylinders.

4. In a socket assembly for mounting a roller in a printing press in engagement with a pair of associated ink cylinders, the combination comprising a base member, a socket member mounted on the base member for rotatably mounting the end of the roller, said base member having a pivot connection with the press frame which is offset from the roller axis for transaxial movement of the roller in a first direction, said socket having a pivot connection with the base member which is offset from the roller axis for transaxial movement of the socket member in a second direction at a large angle to the first, and adjustable springs interposed between the respective pivoted members for applying pressure resiliently to the associated ink cylinders, at least one of said springs having a two way force-transmitting connection at each end.

5. In a socket assembly for mounting a roller in a printing press and for holding the same in engagement with a pair of cylinders, the combination comprising a base member having a hollowed out arcuate shape, said base member having a pivot at its central portion which is laterally oifset with respect to the roller axis for pivotally mounting the same on the frame of the printing press, a socket member having means for journalling the end of the roller, said socket member being pivoted to one end of said base member for limited rocking movement and nestingly received in said hollowed out base member, and means including adjustable springs for applying torque between the pivoted members about their respective pivots.

6. In a socket assembly for an ink roller in a printing press, the combination comprising a base member mounted for limited movement with respect to the frame of the press and having an adjustable spring connection therewith, a socket member movably mounted on said base member and having a' spring connection with respect thereto, means effective during change of rollers for anchoring the socket member with respect to the press frame thereby to maintain the socket member in a desired reference position with respect to the frame of the press against the force of said springs.

7. In a socket assembly for a printing press ink roller, the combination comprising a base member mounted for limited movement with respect to the frame of the press and having a spring connection therewith, a socket member mounted for limited movement with respect to the base member and having a spring connection therewith, said socket member having means for journalling the roller, and means for locking the socket member against movement with respect to the press frame, said locking means including a pin member and a member having a V-shaped notch for receiving the pin member, said pin member and said receiving member being connected to the socket and frame for overcoming the forces of the spring connections during removal and replacement of the roller.

8. In a socket assembly for a printing press ink roller, the combination comprising a base member mounted for limited movement with respect to the frame of the press and having a spring connection therewith, a socket member mounted for limited movement with respect to the base member and having a spring connection therewith, said socket member having means for journalling the roller, a locking lever pivoted to the socket member and having a screw for scissoring the two members relative to one another, said press providing an obstruction in the path of movement of the locking lever so that upon moving the locking member into its obstructing position the locking member is effective to relieve the force of the spring connections and to hold the socket member in position during removal and replacement of the ink roller.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,689,524 Wood Sept. 21, 1954 i. 4*. m. In a. ix

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2689524 *Nov 14, 1951Sep 21, 1954Wood James RThrow-off mechanism for rotary offset presses
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3691956 *Nov 20, 1970Sep 19, 1972North American RockwellFlat adjusting and throw-off arrangement for form roller in printing press
US4369703 *Apr 6, 1981Jan 25, 1983Roberto JarachDevices for numeration, overprinting, perforation and cutting on Offset sheet printing machines
US4554869 *Mar 1, 1984Nov 26, 1985Ranno Sr Edward NAuxiliary form roller apparatus for rotary offset lithographic duplicating machines
US5357862 *Jan 24, 1994Oct 25, 1994Komori CorporationRoller holding apparatus for printing press
US5375519 *May 21, 1993Dec 27, 1994Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AgDevice for receiving rollers
US5555806 *Jan 11, 1995Sep 17, 1996Man Roland Druckmaschinen AgRoller assembly in an inking unit or a damping unit of a rotary printing machine
US7117792Sep 21, 2002Oct 10, 2006Koenig & Bauer AktiengesellschaftMethod and devices for regulating at least one cylinder in a printing press
US7124683Sep 21, 2002Oct 24, 2006Koenig & Bauer AktiengesellschaftDevice for regulating cylinders in a printing machine
US7555981 *Jun 23, 2004Jul 7, 2009Komori CorporationRoller support apparatus for printing roller
DE1227916B *Apr 28, 1962Nov 3, 1966Maschf Augsburg Nuernberg AgLageranordnung fuer einen Zylinder von Druckmaschinen, insbesondere fuer den Gummi-zylinder einer Bogenoffsetdruckmaschine
DE1260485B *Jan 19, 1962Feb 8, 1968Miehle Goss Dexter IncFarbwalzenlagerung fuer Rotationsdruckmaschinen
DE10244042B4 *Sep 21, 2002Feb 1, 2007Koenig & Bauer AgVorrichtung zum Einstellen mindestens einer Walze in einer Druckmaschine
EP0941849A1 *Mar 5, 1999Sep 15, 1999Maschinenfabrik WifagDevice for mounting and positioning a roller
Classifications
U.S. Classification101/352.8
International ClassificationB41F31/00, B41F31/30
Cooperative ClassificationB41F31/304
European ClassificationB41F31/30D