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Publication numberUS2893218 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 7, 1959
Filing dateFeb 21, 1958
Priority dateFeb 21, 1958
Publication numberUS 2893218 A, US 2893218A, US-A-2893218, US2893218 A, US2893218A
InventorsJames R Harnish
Original AssigneeBorg Warner
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Air conditioning systems
US 2893218 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 7, 1959 J. R. HARNISH AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS Filed Feb. 21, 1958 :s Sheets-Sheet i INDOOR 25 REVERSIBLE 34 HEAT EXCHANGER INTERIOR ZONE 59 /7O OUTDOOR REVERSIBLE AIR UNIT EXT E RIOR ZONE AIR INVENTOR JAMES R. HARNISH BY I F TORNEY FIG.

July 7, 1959 I J. R. HARNISH 2,893,218

AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS Filed Feb. 21, 1958 25 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 35 32 (CONDENSER) r 38 I4 u N y .I. 7... 1

(EVAPO- 4O COOLER RATOR) (EVAPO- RAToR) INVENTOR JAMES R. HARNIS'H ATTORNEY y 1959 J. R. HARNISH 2,893,218

AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS Filed Feb. 21. 1958 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 22 21 3 CONDENSER 40% 3 l7 3 4 45 {Q38 4||7l =34 36 4 COOLE; E 89 v J INVENTOR an JAMES R. HARNISH AT TORNEY United States Patent fitiee 2,893,218 Patented July 7, 1959 AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS james lR. Hamish, York, Pa., assignor to Borg-Warner Corporation, Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Illinois Application February 21, 1958, Serial No. 716,653

15 Claims. (Cl. 62180) 'This invention relates to air conditioning systems for year-round conditioning of multi-room buildings and particularly to that type of system utilizing a reversible refrigerating apparatus.

Generally, in air conditioning a multi-room building, it will be found that portions of the building, such as an interior zone, will require year-round cooling while the exterior zone, or perimeter portion of the building, will require cooling during a portion of the year and heating during the remainder of the year. It will be apparent that during that time of the year that the exterior zone requires heating, operating economies can be effected if the heat removed from the interior zone were made available for heating the exterior zone. Such systems are well known and have'heretofore been proposed.

It is also well known that a reversible refrigerating apparatus may be utilized to both heat and cool a building. Operated normally, the refrigerating apparatus removes heat from the interior of the building and dissipates it to the exterior. When heating of the building is required, the apparatus may be reversed operating as a heat pump and picking up heat from outside air. In heating with such a reversible refrigerating apparatus and particularly that type utilizing outside air as a heat source, aprimary disadvantage is that as the outside temperature drops and heating requirements increase, the available heat decreases. While this disadvantage is not present in that type of reversible refrigerating apparatus using water as a heat source, generally speaking, suflicient water is not available for the purpose and outside air must be relied on.

I propose an air conditioning system combining the advantages of the above two systems. Although it is subject somewhat to the disadvantage of a conventional heat pump system in that heat must be picked up from the outside air, this is alleviated to a great degree since complete advantage is taken of the internal heat available. Outside air is used as a heat source only to the extent that there is insufficient heat available from the interior zones. The higher the internal heat load of the building in relation to the heat requirements of the exterior zone, the more eflicient the system becomes.

It is an object of the invention, therefore, to provide an air conditioning system for multi-room buildings having an interior zone comprising a refrigerating system for cooling the interior zone and operable to utilize heat removed therefrom for heating the exterior zone and also operable for removing heat from outside air to aid in heating the exterior zone when there is insuflicient heat removed from the interior zone for providing the total heat requirements of the exterior zone.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a refrigerating system for heating a building and comprising a cooler, an indoor heat-exchanger and an outdoor air unit, and means for operating the indoor heat-exchanger as a condenser and for operating the outdoor air unit as a refrigerant evaporator in parallel with the cooler.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a reversible refrigerating system for conditioning a building comprising a cooler, an indoor reversible heat-exchanger and an outdoor reversible air unit, all connected in a closed refrigerant circuit, and means for operating the indoor reversible heat-exchanger as a cooler or condenser and for operating the outdoor reversible air unit as a condenser or evaporator. When the indoor heat-exchanger operates as a cooler, the outdoor heat-exchanger operates as a condenser. When the indoor heat-exchanger operates as a condenser, the outdoor heat-exchanger is either inoperative or operative as a refrigerant evaporator to pick up heat from outside air.

Yet another object is to provide a reversible refrigerating system of the type just above-mentioned, wherein compression means are provided operable to compress refrigerant flowing from the cooler to the indoor heatexchanger (when functioning as a condenser) in a single stage of compression, and operable to compress refrigerant flowing from the outdoor air unit (when functioning as an evaporator) -to the indoor heat-exchanger (when functioning as a condenser) in plural stages of compression.

In carrying out the invention, separate air treating units are provided for the interior and exterior zones. Each unit includes a heat-exchange coil and a fan. A mixture of recirculated air and fresh air flows over the heat-exchange coils and then is delivered by each fan to its respective zone. A refrigerating apparatus is provided including a water cooler, an indoor, reversible heatexchanger operable either as a water cooler or a watercooled condenser, and an outdoor air unit operable as a refrigerant condenser or evaporator. Water chilled in the water cooler is connected in a closed circuit with the heat exchange coil in the interior zone air treating unit. Water chilled or heated in the indoor, reversible heat-exchanger is connected in a closed circuit with the heat-exchange coil in the exterior zone air treating unit. During that time of the year that both zones require cooling, the indoor, reversible heat-exchanger operates as a water cooler and the two coolers then operate in parallel. One cooler absorbs heat from water circulated through the interior zone air treating unit coil and the other absorbs heat from water circulated through the exterior zone air treating unit coil. Both reject this heat to the outdoor air unit operating as a condenser.

At such times of the year as the exterior zone requires heating and sufficient heat is available for this purpose from the interior zone, then the outdoor air unit is shut down and the indoor, reversible heat-exchanger operates as a condenser. The cooler is then utilized to absorb heat from the Water circulated in the closed circuit including the interior zone air treating unit coil, which heat is then rejected to the indoor, reversible heat-exchanger functioning as a condenser. The water circulated in the closed circuit, including the exterior zone air treating unit coil, absorbs the heat picked up by the cooler and rejected to the indoor, reversible heat-exchanger by the compressor. This heat is dissipated to the air passing over the exterior zone air treating unit coil for heating the air.

During such times of the year that there is insuflicient heat available from the interior zone to heat the exterior zone, then the outside air unit operates as an evaporator in parallel with the cooler. Both the cooler and the evaporator then reject their heat to the indoor, reversible heat-exchanger, which still functions as a condenser. As before, the water circulated in the closed circuit including the exterior zone air treating unit coil, absorbs the heat and dissipates it to the air flowing over the coil to heat the air.

The invention consists of the novel constructions, arrangements and devices to be hereinafter described and claimed for carrying out the above-stated objects and such other objects as will appear from the following description' of preferred embodiments of' the invention described with reference to the accompanying drawings, in w ic Fig. l is a schematic representation of an air. conditioning system according to the invention;

Fig. 2 is a schematic representation of the refrigerating apparatus as shown in Fig. 1, but on an intermediate cycle of operation;

Fig. 3 is a view similar to Fig. 2 showing the winter cycle of' operation; and

Fig. 4 is aview comparable to Fig. 3 showing a modification thereof.-

Like numerals'refer to like parts throughout theseveral views;

Turning now to Fig. l, the refrigerating apparatus comprises a compressor 10, a water cooler 11, an indoor, reversible heat-exchanger l2functioning as a water cooler or a water-cooled'condenser, and an outdoor air unit 13 functioning as a refrigerant evaporator or condenser. Hereinafter, the heat-exchanger 12 will be denoted a cooler orcondenser depending on its then function, and the outdoor air unit 13'will be denoted an evaporator or condenser depending on its function. It will be appreciated thatwhen the heat-exchanger 12 functions as a cooler the air unit 13 functions as a condenser. Conversely, when the heat-exchanger 12 functions as a condenser, the air unit 13 functions as an evaporator when in operation. Cooler 11 inclndesa water coil 14 therein and the heat-exchanger 12 includes a water coil 15 therein. The'outdoor air unit 13.includes a refrigerant coil 16 and afan 17. A switch 18 is provided for controlling the operation of fan 17.

A hot gas line 19 leads from the discharge of compressor 10 and connects to a three-way valve 20 including junctions 21, 22. and 23, with line 19 being received in junction 21. The second junction 22 of three-way valve 20 receives a line.24', which is connected to one end of.

refrigerant coil 16.. The third junction 23 of'three-way valve 20 receives a line 25, which communicates with the heat-exchanger 12.

The other end of refrigerant coil 16 is connected to a line 26'which joins a linev 27 leading into. the inlet of a refrigerant receiver 28. Flow through line 26 is controlled by a one-way valve 29. An outlet line 30 leads from receiver 28 and joins with a line 31. Line 31is connected to a line 32'. communicating with the heat-exchanger 12. Refrigerant flow through line 31 en route to heat-exchanger 12 is controlled by a conventional expansion valve 33; Expansion valve, 33 includes a bulb 34 located on .line adjacent heat-exchanger 12. Bulb 34 is connected to valve 33 by way of a capillary 35, all as is old and well-,knownin the art.

A line 36. including an expansion valve 37 extends between line 31 and'cooler 11. Expansion valve 37 has a bulb 38 attached thereto; by way of a capillary 39 for controlling flow of'liquid refrigerant through line 36. A line 40 extends from cooler. 11 to a line 41.leading to the inlet of compressor 10 with the aforementioned bulb 38 being located on line 40 immediately adjacent cooler 11; Line 40 includes a suction'pressure regulating valve 42.

A line 43 leads-from the. line 25, which extends between valve 20 and heat-exchanger 12. Line 43 is connected to a three-way valve.44 including junctions 45, 46 and47, with line 43 being received in junction 45.

Junction 46 Ireceives a line 48 which terminates in line- 24. Junction 47 receives a line 49 which connects with line 41.

A line .50extends between lines 32 and 27 for receiving.

Line 50,. includes a one-way valve 51 70 for controlling the flow of refrigerant therethrough. A-

liquid refrigerant from heat-exchangerlZ when operating as a condenser;

line 52 leads'from the junctureof lines and 31 to an evaporator. Line 52 includes a thermostatic expansion valve 53; Expansion valve 53 comprises a bulb 54 located on refrigerant coil 16 adjacent one end thereof. Bulb 54 is connected to valve 53 by way of the customary capillary 55.

A capacity controller 56 is provided for compressor 10 and includes a bulb 57 connected thereto by way of a capillary 58. All of the various bulbs and capillaries recited contain a volatile fluid so chosen that it will develop a suitable pressure at the desired temperature ofthe refrigerant flowing within the various lines. The pressure thus developed in the bulb is transmitted through the capillary tube to actuate the various expansion valves or capacity controller, as the case may be.

An air treating unit 59 is provided for properly conditioning air delivered to the interior zone of the building. Air treating unit 59 comprises a casing 60 having a fresh air inlet 61 and a return air inlet- 62. Return air inlet 62 is provided with a recirculated air outlet 63 leading to the exterior of the building with flow through outlet 63 being controlled by damper mechanism 64. A damper 65 is provided to properly, proportion flow of air through fresh air inlet 61 and return air inlet 62. Damper tioning .of damper 65 is effected. by way of a damper control mechanism 66v controlledv by. a thermostat 67 located in the return air stream.

Air treating unit 59 includes awater coil 68'and a fan 69 of suitable capacity for drawing a mixture of fresh.

and return air through casing 60 and over coil 68 for delivery to the interior zone. The outlet-of coil 68 is connectedby a line 70 to the inlet of coil '14-located in cooler 11. The inlet of coil 68 is connected'to the outlet of coil 14 by way of aline 71 having a pump 72 and a modulating. valve 73 therein. Modulating valve 73 has a bypass line 74 connected thereto for bypassing water around coil 68 and into line 70. The operation of modulating valve 73 is controlled by the aforementioned thermostat 67.

An air treating unit 75 is provided for properly conditioning the air supply to the exterior zone. Unit 75 includes a casing 76 having a fresh air inlet 77 and a return-air inlet 78 controlled by suitable dampers 79 and 80 respectively. Air treating unit 75'comprises further a-watercoil -81 and a fan-82. Fan 821is sized to provide for the proper flow of fresh air and return air through 1 casing 76 and over water coil 81 for delivery to the exterior zone rooms. Coil 81 has the outlet thereof connected by way of a line 83 to the inlet of coil, 15 in heatexchanger 12. Bulb 57, which effects the properpositiom ing of controller 56 is located on line 83. A line 84 joins the inlet of coil 81 with the outlet of coil 15. Line 48', as shown in Figs. l-3 is replaced by lines and 91 interconnected by a three-way valve 92 having junctions 93, 94 and 95; Line 90 is connected with junction 93 and line 91 is connected with junction 94. The discharge of compressor 89is connected to line 90 by way of a hot gas line 96. and the inlet to the compressor is connected by way of .a line 97 to junction-950i three-way valve 92;.

Operation I The system operates on three different cycles of operatron: summer, winter and intermediate.

i The summer ycle is that time of year when cooling is required in both the interior and exterior zones of the building. The wintef cycle is that time of year wherein the outside air temperature is such that the total heat rejected from the i'riterior z'one is less thanthe heating requirements of the exterior zone. During the winter cycle the heat available from the internal zone must then be supplemented by heat picked up from the outside air. The intermediate cycle of operation is that time of the year when the exterior zone requires heating, with suflicient heat being available for that purpose from the interior zone.

Turning now to Fig. 1, the operation on the summer cycle will be described. Valves 20 and 44' are set as shown. Indoor reversible heat-exchanger 12 is operating as a water cooler and outdoor air unit 13 is functioning as a refrigerant condenser. Cooler 11 is in operation to chill water flowing through coil 14. Hot gaseous refrigerant compressed by compressor flows through line 19 and is then directed by a valve 20 into line 24. From line 24 the hot gas flows through coil 16'wherein it has its heat removed by the outside air flowing thereover under the influence of fan 17. The now condensed refrigerant liquid exits coil 16 by way of line 26 flowing past one-way valve 29 and through line 27 into receiver 28. The liquid refrigerant then exits receiver 28 by way of lines 30 and 31, with part continuing on to cooler .12 via line 32 and part flowing through line 36 to cooler ill. The refrigerant liquid has its pressure and corre- :sponding temperature reduced in flowing through ex- .pansion valves 33 and 37 respectively. The cold re- .fri-gerant liquid within coolers 11 and 12 then removes .the heat from the water flowing through coils 14 and .respectively, becoming vaporized thereby. The gas .leaves cooler 11 by way of line 40 flowing thence into line 41 back to the inlet of compressor 10. Refrigerant gas within cooler 12 exits therefrom by way of line 25 flowing thence into line 43. From line 43 it is directed by valve 44 into line 49 from whence it merges with the gas from cooler 11 in line 41 to complete the cycle.

The suction pressure regulating valve 42 maintains a constant suction pressure within cooler 11 to provide a supply of chilled water therefrom at a fairly constant temperature and to insure that no freeze ups occur in cooler 11 under light loads, all as is customary in the refrigerating art.

Water chilled in cooler 11 is pumped by pump 72 through coil 68 and thence through line 70 back to the inlet of coil 14 to complete the chilled water cycle. -Modulating valve 73, under the control of thermostat 67 permits only so much water to flow through coil 68 as ,is needed to cool down the air flowing thereover to the desired temperature. The remainder of the water is bypassed around coil 68 by way of line 74. Damper 65 is in a position to allow flow of fresh air into air treating unit 59 only in sufficient quantities to satisfy ventilation requirements. The mixture of fresh and recirculated :air properly conditioned in flowing over coil 68 is then delivered by fan 69 to the various rooms in the interior zone served thereby.

The chilled water in coil 15 is pumped through coil 81 in the exterior zone air treating unit under the influence of pump 85. Air flowing through air treating .unit 75 under the influence of fan 82 has its heat removed by the chilled water flowing through coil 81 and Dampers 79 and 80 are positioned to requirements.

As the outside air temperature drops, the system goes on the intermediate cycle, as is shown in Fig. 2. Three- ,Way valve is rotated to communicate lines 19 and and three-way valve 44 is positioned so that there can be no flow therethrough. Fan 17 in the outdoor aii unit 13 is inoperative under the control of switch 18 and the outdoor air unit is therefore also inoperative. Refrigerant compressed by compressor 10 flows through line 19 and is then directed by three way valve 20 into line 25 whence it flows into heat-exchanger 12 now functioning as a water-cooled refrigerant condenser. The refrigerant gives up its heat to the water flowing through coil 15 becoming condensed thereby. The now liquid refrigerant leaves condenser 12 by way of lines 32 and 50, flowing past one-way valve 51 and through line 27 into receiver 28. The liquid refrigerant in receiver 28 exits therefrom by way of line 30 and then flows via lines 31 and 36 into cooler 11. In its passage through line 36, the refrigerant flows through expansion valve 37 whereby its pressure and corresponding temperature are reduced. The cold refrigerant liquid within cooler 11 then serves to remove heat from the water flowing through coil 14, becoming vaporized thereby. The gas then flow-s through lines 40 and 41 back to the inlet of compressor 10 to complete the cycle.

Heated water flowing through coil 15 of condenser 12 is then utilized in coil 81 of the exterior zone air treating unit to heat air flowing thereover under the influence of fan 82 for delivery to the exterior zone in order to provide the necessary heating.

Chilled water flowing through coil 14 of water cooler 11 then flows through coil 68 in the interior zone air treating unit 59 to cool air flowing thereover under the influence of fan 69. The properly cooled air will then be delivered by the fan to the various rooms of the interior zone.

Compressor 10 has its capacity reduced by controller 56 to a point where the refrigerating apparatus only removes suflicient heat from the interior zone to just satisfy the heating requirement of the exterior zone. Suction pressure regulating valve 42 will insure that no freeze ups occur during this period of operation.

It will be borne in mind that down to the temperature at which the system goes on the winter cycle, there will be more heat rejected from the interior zone than is needed by the exterior zone. The system, of course, goes on the winter cycle when the heat rejected from the interior zone just balances the heat required by the exterior zone. Below this temperature the requirements of the exterior will be greater than can be supplied solely by the interior zone. Bulb 57 operates to maintain a desired temperature of the heated water flowing through line 83. Should the temperature of the water rise, indicating that too much heat has been absorbed by cooler 11 and rejected by compressor 10 to condenser 12 for absorption by the water flowing through coil 15, then controller 56 operates to reduce the capacity of compressor 10. Any well known capacity reduction device can be utilized; for example, the compressor unloading device disclosed in Patent No. 2,526,922. Should the temperature of the water flowing through line 83 drop, then controller 56 operates to increase the capacity of compressor 10.

Any additional cooling required in the interior zone, because of the reduction in capacity of compressor 10, will be supplied by increasing the quantity of fresh, cold air allowed to pass through air treating unit 59 en route to the interior zone rooms. With valve 73 open to permit full flow of chilled water through coil 68, should this be insufiicient to provide adequate cooling, then thermostat '67 will operate on damper control mechanism 66 to re position damper 65 to permit a greater quantity of cold air to flow through the air treating unit to provide the additional cooling.

It will be apparent that when a greater than normal quantity of fresh air is brought into the interior zone of the building, under the circumstances as set out just above, some means must be provided for exhausting excess air from the building. This is taken care of by the recirculated airoutlet 63. Dampers'64 are .of the :spring balanced type and when the pressure within. outlet .63 builds :up sufficiently to force dampers -64\open, the excess .air exits the building. A ;positive exhaust {fan (not shown) may also be provided ,for this purpose.

As the outside ,air temperature continues to .drop, it eventually reaches a point where .the system goes on -the'winter cycle, as shown in .Fig. 3 and ,to which refer- ;ence-is had. 'Valve ;20 :is set ,to provide communication ibetween :lines -19and,-25 and valve 44 is set to provide communication between lines 49 and '48. Switch 18 is .actuated to place fan l-l ,into ,operation and the outdoor air unit is therefore operativeas arrefrigerant evaporator. Refrigerant compressed by compressor 10-flows through :line 19 whence it is directed -'by -.,valve 120 into line 25. ;From line 25 the-gas flows through heat-exchanger 12 functioning as:a refrigerant'condenser, giving up its heat to the waterrflowing-through coil .15 and .becoming con- :densed thereby. The refrigerant liquid leaves heat- -,exchanger -12 by way.o f line ;32,and flowsithrough line 50 past one-way Valve 51 and through line 27 .into receiver 28. The liquid, on Ileaving receiver 28 takes two paths. One-part flows into lines. 31 and 36and through cooler 11, .as in the intermediatecycleof operation. Theremainder .flows'through lines 52 and 26 into coil 16. In flowing through line 52 the :liquid-has its pressure and corresponding temperature reduced by thermostatic expan- -sion valve 53. The cold liquid in flowing through coil 16 absorbs heat from outdoor air flowing thereover under .the influence of fan 17 becoming vaporized thereby.

Thegas leaves coil 16 by way-of line 24 flowing thence into line 48. From line 48 the gas is directed -.by three- -way valve 44 into line 4-9 whence it merges in line 41 -.with the gas from cooler .11.

Heat picked up in the outdoor air unit supplements heat available from'the internal zone toprovide for'the requirements of the exterior zone. The water flow through coil 68 in the interior zone air treating .unit 59 and through-coil 81 of the exterior zone air treating unit 75 is identical to that of theintermediate cycle. How- .ever, damper 65 is againpositioned topermit only sufficient outside air to pass through air treating unit 59 .to satisfy the ventilation requirements of the interior zone.

-In the system disclosed in Fig. 4, operationon .the summer and intermediate cycles is identical to the-Fig. -1 system. For this-purpose, valve92, as seen in Fig. 4, .is set to a position communicating lines 90 and 91, which -lines then become the equivalent of line 48-in-the Fig. 1 system. This takes compressor 89 out of operation, since .valve 92 shuts off all communication to it.

Onthewinter cycle, however, valves 92, 44 and are set as shown in Fig. 4, and the system operates as follows: refrigerant compressed 'by compressor 10 flows through line 19 whence-it is directed by valve 20 into line 25. From-line the gas fiowsthrough heatexchanger .12, functioning as a refrigerant condenser, .giving up its heat to the water flowing-through coil 15 and becoming condensed-thereby. The refrigerant liquid leaves heat-exchanger 12 by way of line 32 and flows through line '50 past one-wayvalver5land throughline 27 .into receiver 28. The liquid, on leaving receiver 28, takes ,two paths; one partthrough lines 31 and 36 and through cooler '11, and one part through lines 52 and 26 into .coil 16. In flowing through expansion valves 37 and 53, the liquid has its pressureand corresponding temperature reduced to a point whereit canpick up heat'from vthe chilled water flowing through coil -14 or the outdoor air flowing over ,coil 16, the liquid becoming vaporized in both cases. The gas leavescooler 11 by way of line 40 flowing thence into line 41 and back to the,inlet;of .compressor 10. Up ato this point the operation of the .Fig. 4 system is identical ,to that=disclosed in -;F ig. 3. The difference-lies in the fact that gas leaving coil e16 flows into line 91 whence it is directed -by valve 92 into line 97 and the inlet of compressor-8i Thfl has its pressure increased ;in.passing through compressor 89 to thesuction .pressureof Compressor 1 0. The gas discharges from compressor 89 ,by way of line 96 whence it flows into line 90 Eromline 90 the gas is directed by valve 4.4,into line 49 .whence itflows .into line 41-to merge with Illegals flowing from cooler 11 to complete .thevcycle.

The iuseof -.booster compresson89 allows a lower pressure to he maintained within coil 16 and a correspondn ly lower refrig ran t mp r T permits a correspondingly greater transfer of heat between the refrigerant within the coil 16 and the air passingthereover. At the same time, the efficiency ofrthe refrigerating apparatusis increased due tothe removal of heat from the interior system ,at a .high temperature level with only supplementary heat supplied from the low temperature level.

It will be understood that the term water, as used inthe specification and claims, is used in a generic sense as denoting any heat-exchange medium suitable for the purpose.

I vwish it to ,be understood that my invention is not to be limited to the specific constructions and arrangementsshown nd d scribed, except only insofar as the claims maybeso limited, as it will be apparent to those skilled inthe art that changes may be made without de partingfrom the principles of the invention.

iair uninconnected in a closed refrigerant circuit; means connecting said interior zoneiunit waterrcoil in a closed water circuit with said water vcooler; means connecting said exteriorzone unit water coil in a closed water circuit with said indoor reversible heat-exchanger; and means for operating said indoor reversible heat-exchanger as ,a water.coolcr and said outdoor reversible air unit as a condenser or for alternatively operating said indoor reversible heat-exchanger as a condenser and said outdoor reversible air unit as an evaporator.

2. An air conditioningsystem for multi-room buildings having an interior zone and an exterior zone comprising an air treating unit, including a water coil, for said interior zone; an air treating unit, including a water coil, for said exterior zone; means for delivering air treated in said units 'to the respective zone rooms; a

indoor reversible heat-exchanger as a condenser and ,for operating said outdoor reversible air unit as an evaporator'in parallelwith said water cooler.

3. An air conditioning-system for multi-room buildings having aninterior zone and an exterior zone comprising ;an air treating unit, including a water coil, for said interior zone; an air treating unit, including a water coil, for said exterior zone; means for delivering air treated in said units to the respective zone rooms; a refrigerating ,system comprising a water cooler, an in- 1 door reversible heat-cha ger and an outdoor reversible air-unitconnectedin a closed refrigerant circuit; means connecting said interior zone unit water coil in a closed water circuit with said water cooler; means connecting said exterior zone unit water coil in a closed water circuit with said indoor reversible heat-exchanger; means for operating said indoor reversible heat-exchanger as a water cooler in parallel with said aforementioned cooler and for operating said outdoor reversible air unit as a condenser; first alternative means for operating said in-' door reversible heat-exchanger as a condenser for said watercooler with said outdoor reversible air unit being inoperative; and second alternative means for operating said indoor reversible heat-exchanger as a condenser and for operating said outdoor reversible air unit as an evaporator in parallel with said water cooler.

4. An air conditioning system for multi-room buildings having an interior zone and an exterior zone comprising :an air treating unit, including a water coil, for said interior zone; an air treating unit, including a water coil, for saidexterior zone; means for delivering air treated in said units to the respective Zone rooms; a refrigerating system comprising refrigerant compression means, a water cooler, an indoor reversible heat-exchanger and an outdoor reversible air unit connected in a closed refrigerant circuit; means connecting said interior zone unit water coil in a closed water circuit with said water cooler; means connecting said exteriorzone unit water coil in a closed water circuit with said indoor reversible heatexchanger; means for operating said indoor reversible heat-exchanger as a water cooler in parallel with said aforementioned water cooler, for operating said outdoor reversible air unit as a condenser, and for operating said compression means to compress refrigerant flowing from said coolers to said condenser in one stage of compression; and means for operating said indoor reversible heat-exchanger as a condenser, for operating said outdoor reversible air unit as an evaporator in parallel with said water cooler, and for operating said compression means to compress refrigerant flowing from said water cooler to said condenser in one stage of compression and to compress refrigerant flowing from said evaporator to said condenser in plural stages of compression.

5. A reversible refrigerating system for conditioning heat-exchange medium for a building having concurrent heating and cooling loads comprising compression means, a cooler, an indoor reversible heat-exchanger and an outdoor reversible air unit; means connecting said components in a closed refrigerating circuit; means for directing refrigerant flow from said compression means through said outdoor reversible air unit and thence in parallel through said cooler and said indoor reversible heat-exchanger for return to said compression means, or for alternatively directing refrigerant flow from said compression means through said indoor reversible heat-exchanger and thence in parallel through said cooler and said outdoor reversible air unit for return to said compression means; and means for flowing said heat-ex change medium in heat-exchange relation with said cooler and said indoor reversible heat-exchanger.

6. A reversible refrigerating system for conditioning heat-exchange medium for a building having concurrent heating and cooling loads comprising compression means, a cooler, an indoor reversible heat-exchanger and an outdoor reversible air unit; means connecting said components in a closed refrigerating circuit; means for directing refrigerant from said compression means through said outdoor reversible air unit and thence in parallel through said cooler and said indoor reversible heat-exchanger for return to said compression means; first alternative means for directing refrigerant flow from said compression means through said indoor reversible heat-exchanger and thence through said cooler for return to said compression means; second alternative means for directing refrigerant flow from said compres sion means through said indoor reversible heat exchanger and thence in parallel through said cooler and said out- 10 door reversible air unit for return to said compression means; and means for flowing said heat-exchange medium in heat-exchange relation with said cooler and said indoor reversible heat-exchanger.

7. A reversible refrigerating system for conditioning heat-exchange medium for a building having concurrent heating and cooling loads comprising compression means, a cooler, an indoor reversible heat-exchanger and an outdoor reversible air unit; means connecting said components in a closed refrigerating circuit; means for directing refrigerant flow from said compression means through said outdoor reversible air unit and thence in parallel through said cooler and said indoor reversible heat-exchanger for return to said compression means; means for alternatively directing refrigerant flow from said compression means through said indoor reversible heat-exchanger and thence in parallel through said cooler and said outdoor reversible air unit for return to said compression means, and for operating said compression means to compress refrigerant flowing from said outdoor reversible air unit to said compression means in plural stages of compression; and means for flowing said heatexchange medium in heat-exchange relation with said cooler and said reversible indoor heat-exchanger.

8. A refrigerating system for cooling and heating heatexchange medium for a building having concurrent heating and cooling loads comprising compression means, a cooler, an indoor heat-exchanger and an outdoor air unit; means connecting said components in a closed refrigerating circuit; means for directing refrigerant flow from said compression means through said indoor heatexchanger and thence in parallel through said cooler and said outdoor air unit for return to said compression means; and means for flowing heat-exchange medium in heat-exchange relation with said cooler and said indoor heat-exchanger.

9. A refrigerating system for cooling and heating heatexchange medium for a building having concurrent heating and cooling loads comprising compression means, a cooler, an indoor heat-exchanger and an outdoor air unit; means connecting said components in a closed refrigerating circuit; means for directing refrigerant flow from said compression means through said indoor heatexchanger and thence in parallel through said cooler and said outdoor air unit for return to said compression means, and for operating said compression means to compress said refrigerant flowing from said outdoor air unit to said compression means in plural stages of compression and to compress said refrigerant flowing from said cooler to said compression means in a single stage of compression; and means for flowing said heat-exchange medium in heat-exchange relation with said cooler and said indoor heat-exchanger.

10. A refrigerating system for cooling the interior zone and heating the exterior zone of a building comprising compression means, a cooler, an indoor heatexchanger and an outdoor air unit; means connecting said components in a closed refrigerating circuit; means for directing refrigerant flow from said compression means through said indoor heat-exchanger and thence in parallel through said cooler and said outdoor air unit for return to said compression means; means for passing a heat-exchange medium in heat-exchange relation with said indoor heat-exchanger for heating said medium; means for passing a heat-exchange medium in heat-exchange relationship with said cooler for chilling said medium; and means for flowing chilled medium in heatexchange relation with interior zone air and for flowing heated medium in heat-exchange relation with exterior zone air.

11. An air conditioning system for multi-room buildings having an interior zone requiring cooling and an exterior zone requiring heating comprising an air treating unit, including a water coil, for said interior zone; an air treating unit, including a water coil, for said exterior zone;-, means for delivering air treated in said units to'the respective zone rooms; a refrigerating system comprising compressiom means, a water cooler, an indoor heat-ex:- changer and an outdoor air unit connected in a closed refrigerant circuit; means connecting said interior zone unit water coil: in. a closed. water circuit with. said water cooler; means connecting said exterior zone unit water coil. in a closed Water circuit with said indoor heat-exchanger; means for directing flow of refrigerant from saidcompression means. through said. indoor heat-exchanger and thence through said cooler-for return to said compression. means when the heat rejection. from said interior zone is greater than the. heating load. of said exterior zone, said outdoor air unit beingi noperative;v and means. for directing. flow of refrigerant. from said compression. means through said indoor heat-exchanger. and thence in parallel through said cooler and said outdoor air unit when the heat rejection. from said interior zone is. less than the heat load of said exterior zone.

12. The system as set out in claim ll including means.

for. controllingthe capacity of said compression means to a point where-the heat rejection from said interior zone just equals the heating load of said exterior zone..

13. The system as set out in claim 12including means for supplying fresh air to said interior and exterior Zones, and means for varying, the supply offresh' air to said interior zone when said capacity controlling means is oper-.

ative.

14. An air conditioning, system for supplying heated and chilled air to multi-room buildings having concurrent heating and cooling loads comprising a first air treating 12- unit, including a water coil, for supplying saidheated air; a second air treating unit, including a water coil, for

supplying said chilled air; means for delivering air treated.

in said unitsto-the respective rooms;.a'refrigeratingsysvtem comprising compression means,,a water cooler and-a condenser connected in a closed refrigerantcircuit; means connecting said first air treating unit water coil in-a-closed water circuit with. said condenser; means connecting saidsecond air treating unit water coil in a closedwater circuit withsaid water cooler; means for directing flow of refrigerant from said compression means through said condenser and thence through. said water cooler for return to said compression means; means for supplying; outside air to said second air treating unit for delivery to saidrooms; means for varying the quantities of outside air supplied to said second air treating; unit; and means for varying the capacity of said compression means.

15. The air conditioning system of claim- 14 wherein said refrigerating system further includes an outdoor air unit connected in said closed refrigerant circuit;. and means for directing fiow of refrigerant from said come pression means. through said condenser and thence: in; parallel through said cooler and said. outdoor air unit when the heat rejection from said building is less than.

25- the heat requirements thereof.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification62/180, 62/434, 62/324.1, 62/228.1, 62/406, 62/510, 62/96, 62/435
International ClassificationF25B13/00, F24F3/00, F25B1/10
Cooperative ClassificationF25B1/10, F25B2313/02732, F24F3/001, F25B13/00
European ClassificationF25B13/00, F25B1/10, F24F3/00B2