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Publication numberUS2895186 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 21, 1959
Filing dateJun 10, 1957
Priority dateJun 10, 1957
Publication numberUS 2895186 A, US 2895186A, US-A-2895186, US2895186 A, US2895186A
InventorsFranks Norvin H
Original AssigneeUnion Asbestos & Rubber Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Framing connector
US 2895186 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 21, 1959 N. H. FRANKS FRAMING CONNECTOR ///)VVEN7'OR.'

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\ M 6 v a 4 w United States Patent FRAMING CONNECTOR Norvin H. Franks, Chicago, Ill., assign'or, by mesne assignments, to Union Asbestos & Rubber Company, Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Illinois Application June 10, 1957, Serial No. 664,657

3 Claims. ((11. 20-95) This invention relates to a framing connector and more particularly to a connector for the posts and rails oi wooden framing, as used in pallet stackers and the li e.

There are many types of framing in which it is desirable to connect rails in a rectangular or other closed section framework to posts for temporary or semi-permanent framing. One example, is in pallet stackers in which vertical posts mounted at the corners of pallets are connected at their upper ends by horizontal rails to form a framework on which additional pallets can be stacked.

It is desirable for uses of this character to be able to use lengths of standard materials such as 2 x 4 or 2 x 2 wooden strips. It is also desirable to be able to assemble such strips into the framework without nailing or cutting to special shapes and to be able to reuse the strips.

It is one of the objects of the present invention to provide a framing connector which will connect standard wooden strips securely in a framework without the use of nails or like fastenings and 'without requiring special cutting of the strips.

Another object is to provide a framing connector in which the ends of the posts and rails are securely gripped in the assembly and are removable for reuse.

According to a feature of the invention, the connector is formed of a minimum number of sheet metal stamp ings assembled by welding, or the like, to provide a socket to fit securely over the end of a post and two pairs of spaced walls facing at an angle to each other to receive between the walls of each pair the end of a rail.

A further object is to provide a framing connector in which the walls are formed with integrally pressed out lip portions to grip the posts and rails.

The above and other objects and features of the invention will be more readily apparent from the following description when read in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which:

Figure 1 is a perspective vie-w of a pallet stacker assembly employing a framing connector embodying the invention;

Figure 2 is a perspective 'view of the framing connector; and

Figure 3 is a disassembled view showing the stampings of which the framing connector is formed.

The framing connector is illustrated in connection with a stacker for use with conventional wooden pallets formed by spaced stringers connected by face boards 11 on which merchandise of any desired type may be supported. The pallet is provided adjacent each corner with a shoe indicated generally at 12. Each shoe is formed with an upwardly facing socket 13 in which a vertical corner post is supported.

As shown, the posts 14 are lengths of conventional 2 x 4 timber cut to the desired length to provide the desired spacing between pallets and are fitted tightly into the sockets 13 to be held in vertical position thereby. The shoes are left and right hand so that the widths of the posts 14 all extend in the same direction for convenience of loading.

At their upper ends the posts 14 are connected by horizontal rails 15 which are also cut lengths of standard timbers. The rails may be 2 x 4s or may, if preferred, be 2 x 2s. If 2 x 4s are employed, they are mounted with their wide dimension vertically so that in either case the horizontal width of the rail will be the standard finished width of 2." timber or 1%".

The connector of the present invention is adapted to secure the rails to the posts in a manner such that the rails will be held securely, but can be removed for re use. As illustrated in Figure 3, the connector is made up of three stampings constituting two side stampings 16 and 17 and a center stamping 18. The stamping 16 is provided throughout approximately its lower half with parallel flanges 19 and at its upper half is formed with a flange 21 coplanar with one of the flanges 19, but of substantially double its length. In its flat portion between the flanges 19 the sheet is formed with parallel slits and the metal is pressed out between the slits to form a pair of tongues 22 fastened at their ends to the sheet and projecting beyond the surface of the sheet between their ends for gripping. In its upper part, the sheet is formed with a similar lip 23 near the edge of the central plate portion and with a lip 24 in the flange 21. Also substantially midway of the width of the central plate portion there is provided a slot 25 for a purpose to appear later.

The stamping 17 is similar in its lower portion to the stamping 16, being formed with spaced flanges 26 and with pressed-in lips 27. In its upper portion, the plate is bent substantially midway of its width to define a flange 28. The upper web portion of the stamping 17 is formed with a lip 29 and a similar lip may be provided in the flange 28, as shown at 31. The outer end of the flange 28 is provided with a lug 32 of a size to fit into the slot 25 in the stamping 16.

The center piece 18 is in the form of a flat strip of a length equal to the width of a standard 2 x 4 and a width equal to the thickness of a standard 2 X 4. At its ends, the plate is bent down into flanges 33 which are relatively short, as shown.

To assemble the connector pieces are brought together in a relationship shown in Figures 2 and 3 with the central plate 18 resting on the tops of the flanges 19 and 26 and with the flanges 33 on the plate overlying the flanges 19 and 26, as seen in Figure 2. To complete the assembly, the flanges 33 may be welded at their edges to the flanges 19 and 26, as indicated at 34. Also, the lug 32 where it projects through the slot 25 may be welded to the stamping 16. This operation completes assembly of the unit and can be performed very simply.

In the completely assembled connector, as shown in Figure 2, the lower portions of the two stampings, together with their flanges 19 and 26, provide a downwardly opening socket to receive the upper end of a post 14. The parts are sized so that the post will fit very snugly in the socket and when the socket is forced over the end of the post the lips 22 and 27 will bite into the wood of the post to hold it securely thereon. To facilit-ate removal, the stamping 17 may be formed with a pressed-out boss 35 at its lower edge which can be struck by hammer to drive the connector off of the post. It has been found that with a connector, as so far described, the mounting on the post will be extremely rigid and secure, requiring a considerable degree of force for removal. However, since the end of the post is deformed only by the lips 22 and 27, the post can be reused a number of times with the same security of attachment to the connector.

At the upper end of the connector above the plate 18,

the portions of the stampings define two pairs of spaced walls. Thus the body or web portions of the stampings include a wall portion 36 and a wall portion 37 spaced apart the width of the center plate 18 to receive tightly between them a standard 2 x 2 or a standard 2 x 4 fitted in edgewise. Similarly, the flanges 21 and 28 form a pairof spaced wall portions at right angles to the wall portions 36 and 37 to receive the end of a standard 2 x 2 or 2 x 4 rail. To assemble the rails, the ends may be placed above the partial sockets defined by the pairs of spaced wall portions and driven downwardly into the sockets. During this operation, the lips 23, 24, 29 and 31 will bite into the end portions of the rails to anchor them securely in place.

. In a complete assembly, as shown in Figure 1, the connectors must be right and left hand so that the upper partial sockets will face toward each other to receive opposite ends of a rail extending between the tops of adjacent posts. For some assemblies, however, in which the posts are square, connectors of a single hand can be used satisfactorily.

When the posts and rails are assembled by the connectors, as shown in Figure 1, they form an extremely strong and rigid framework on which additional pallets can be stacked or which can be used for other desired purposes. When it is desired to disassemble the framework, the rails may be driven out of the upper partial sockets by a hammer or mallet and the connectors can be detached from the posts by hammering on the bosses 35. The framework can therefore be easily assembled and disassembled simply by the use of a conventional hammer or mallet and with no other tools or permanent fastenings.

While one embodiment of the invention has been shown and described herein, it will be understood that it is illustrative only and not to be taken as a definition of the scope of the invention, reference being had for this purpose to the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A framing connector for posts comprising a generally rectangular socket defined by angularly related wall sections to fit over the end of a post, wall sections secured to the socket and projecting beyond the end of the post and including two wall portions joined at a right angle and aligned with and coextensive with two adjacent wall sections of the socket respectively and two wall portions joined at a right angle, one of the lastnamed wall portions being aligned with a third wall section of the socket and being substantially half of the width thereof and the other lying at a right angle to one of the first-named wall portions and extending centrally across the top of the socket, said wall portions defining between them a pair of open-sided sockets lying within a projection of the periphery of the first-named socket to receive the ends of rails lying at a right angle to each other.

2. A framing connector for posts comprising a pair of sheet metal members each having a channel section lower portion and an L section upper portion, one side of the L section being coplanar and substantially coextensive with the web of the channel section and the other side of the L section being coplanar with one flange of the channel section in one of the members, one side of the L section being coplanar with the web of the channel section and joined at a right angle to the other side of the L section centrally of the width of the web of the channel section in the other member, the members being joined with their channel sections facing to define a socket to receive the end of a post and with the respective sides of the L section portions in spaced parallel relation with each other to receive the ends of nails between them.

3. A framing connector for posts comprising a pair of sheet metal members each having a channel section lower portion and an L section upper portion, one side of the L section being coplanar and substantially coextensive with the web of the channel section and the other side of the L section being coplanar with one flange of the channel section in one of the members, one side of the L section being coplanar with the web of the channel section and joined at a. right angle to the other side of the L section centrally of the width of the web of the channel section in the other member, the members being joined with their channel sections facing to define a socket to receive the end of a post and with the respective sides of the L section portions in spaced parallel relation with each other to receive the ends of rails between them, and a plate resting on the tops of the flanges of the channel sections with its ends bent at an angle and overlying and secured to the flanges of the channel sections.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 437,592 Goetz Sept. 30, 1890 1,214,738 Wolf Feb. 6, 1917 2,364,003 Scruggs Nov. 28, 1944 2,700,520 Skubic Jan. 25, 1955 FOREIGN PATENTS 731,771 France May 31, 1932

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US437592 *Nov 16, 1889Sep 30, 1890 Timber seat and tie for building purposes
US1214738 *May 27, 1913Feb 6, 1917Aaron WolfCorner-post fastening.
US2364003 *Jan 19, 1943Nov 28, 1944Scruggs William EArticle support
US2700520 *Apr 21, 1951Jan 25, 1955Skubic Leroy FSpacing and supporting facilities for pallets and the like
FR731771A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3494478 *Nov 30, 1967Feb 10, 1970Link Kenneth NGarbage can holding rack
US4572695 *Aug 20, 1984Feb 25, 1986Simpson Strong-Tie Company, Inc.Six finger wood jointing connector
US4885883 *Feb 25, 1988Dec 12, 1989Wright Robert LTwo-by-four corner members
US4982849 *Mar 5, 1990Jan 8, 1991Paul Flum Ideas, Inc.Adapter means for converting a horizontally arranged shelf member in a modular display unit to an angular orientation
US5269455 *May 8, 1992Dec 14, 1993North American Container CorporationSocket
US5598787 *Feb 11, 1994Feb 4, 1997Pronk; Mattheus A. J.Pallet/spacer assembly
US5727358 *Aug 23, 1994Mar 17, 1998Hayashi; YuuichirouMethod of constructing a building
US7559519 *Jul 26, 2006Jul 14, 2009The Steel Netork, Inc.Stud bracket for supporting reinforcing members in a wall structure
WO1994018082A1 *Feb 11, 1994Aug 18, 1994Mattheus Antoon Johan PronkPallet/spacer assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification403/172, 211/188, 403/176, 217/43.00A
International ClassificationE04B1/58, B65D19/38
Cooperative ClassificationB65D9/34, B65D19/385
European ClassificationB65D9/34, B65D19/38B