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Publication numberUS2896789 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 28, 1959
Filing dateSep 18, 1958
Priority dateSep 18, 1958
Publication numberUS 2896789 A, US 2896789A, US-A-2896789, US2896789 A, US2896789A
InventorsLeonard Weiss, Salvatore Sans
Original AssigneeSaw Mill River Ind Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Garment racks
US 2896789 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 2 1959 9 s. SANS ETAL 2,896,789

GARMENT RACKS Filed Sept. 18, 1958 I/NVENERS; SALVATORE SANS,

q="' 5 LEONARD WEISS} ATTORNEV nited States Patent 2,896,789 GARMENT RACKS Salvatore Sans, New Rochelle, and Leonard Weiss, White Plains, N.Y., assignors to Saw Mill River Industries, Inc., Yonkers, N.Y., a corporation of New York Application September '18, 1958, Serial No. 761,832

11 Claims. (Cl. 211-37) The present invention relates to garment racks of the knock-down type and more particularly to those provided with a shelf for hats, or a shoe rack, or both.

These garment racks are usually made of tubular metal stock in several sections, which when assembled, form a substantially rectangular frame positioned upright and centrally on horizontal members at each side of said frame and across the frames plane and below it, to serve as feet, or such members at their distal ends, may be bent downward to provide four feet for such rack. The hat shelf is associated with the upper rail of such frame and the lower rail may serve as part of a shoe rack.

The principal object of this invention is to provide a novel and improved garment rack of the character mentioned, in which the hat and shoe racks are so associated with the garment rack frame as to effect proper and secure assembly of frame parts to be joined and at the same time mount said auxiliary racks in place. Such garment rack and its appurtenances, are of course shipped from the factory knockdown, and the ultimate user is easily able, by simple coupling arrangements provided by the parts themselves, to effect assembly, properly and quickly.

Another object thereof is to provide a novel and improved garment rack of the knockdown type having hat and shoe racks as appurtenances therefor which also serve as the coupling means to erect the article into a rigid .unitary structure, which is simple in construction, reasonably cheap to manufacture and efficient in carrying out the purposes for which it is designed.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent as this disclosure proceeds.

For the practice of this invention, one form it may as sume, is to have the top and bottom horizontal rails of the garment racks rectangular frame, each in two parts, whose meeting end portions are in telescopic relation. Such telescoped ends of each of the said parts are provided with one or two sets of registered holes; such sets of holes being spaced along said rails. The hat shelf may :be formed of thin rod as a horizontal frame having two spaced downwardly directed legs, one longer than the other; the longer one being threaded at its end. Downwardly a predetermined distance from the plane of such shelf, each of said legs is provided with a protuberance which may be formed as struck wings therefrom. Said longer leg is passed through one set of aligned holes mentioned, while the shorter leg is set into a locating hole; all such holes being in the top rail of the garment rack. Only the longer leg protrudes through and out of said top rail, where its threaded end receives a nut. The position of said wings determine the height of the shelf member above the top rail. The shoe rack is formed and the lower rail parts are joined in substantially the same manner as described for the hat shelf. A more detailed description will now be given.

In the accompanying drawing forming part of this specification, similar characters of reference indicate corresponding parts in all the views.

Fig. 1 is a perspective view showing a garment rack embodying the teachings of this invention. As illustrated, it includes both hat and shoe racks.

Fig. 2 is a front edge view of a shelf member.

Fig. 3 is an exploded fragmentary view showing several components of the rectangular frame of the garment rack which are contiguous when assembled.

Fig. 4 is an end view of the lower portion of the garment rack of Fig. '1.

Fig. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary view of an indicated portion of the top and bottom rails of the garment rack frame; such portion being the length A shown along said rails in Fig. 1.

Figs. 2 and 4 include some slight modifications in structure, which will be described.

In the drawing, the numeral 15 designates generally a garment rack comprising a sectional rectangular frame denoted generally by the numeral 16 which is positioned vertically and centrally on the feet members which are indicated generally by the numerals 17, 18 respectively. Said feet members are below said frame, one at each side thereof and extend across the plane of said frame. All these components are preferably made of tubular metal stock; The side posts of said frame 16, may each have a separable intermediate section 19 associated with the remainder of said frame by for instance the use of stud and socket joints as shown at 20. The top rail comprises the joined sections 21, 22, each of which carries a shelf section. These are indicated generally by the numeral 23, 24 respectively. The bottom rail comprises the joined section 25, 26, each of which carries a member denoted generally by the numeral 27 in one instance and by the numeral 28 generally in the other. Fig. 5 shows part of the joint structureemployed for associating the pairs of rail parts. A description thereof as it relates to the top rail of the garment rack frame, shall suffice for such juncture in the bottom rail. Referring to said Fig. 5, the parts 21, 22 have their end portions in telescopic relation; the end portion of part 21 being reduced to accomplish such structure. Such telescopically related portions have two sets of aligned vertical holes; one set being at 29 and the other at 30. Each of the parts 21, 22 also have a single hole 31 only through its top wall. In the preferred embodiment illustrated, each of the feet have aligned holes 32, at a distance in front of the garment rack frame 16. Each of the shelf members 23, 24 and each of the shoe rack members 27, 28, may be made of rod material of for example to A inch round metal stock; Such sets of members carry means for properly locating them on the frame 16 and for securing them in position; at the same time serving to secure the joint shown in Fig. 5 occurring in both the upper and lower rails of said frame 16.

In the embodiment illustrated, each shelf member comprises a horizontally positioned rectangular frame having a welded-on cross bar 33, centrally thereon in the direction of thetop rail of the garment rack frame 16. The ends of this bar 33 are turned downward to form an inverted U-shape with one arm 33 longer than the other and threaded at its distal end to receive a nut 34. The shorter arm 33" sets within the hole 31 and the longer arm 33' is positioned through the set of aligned holes 29 and the nut 34 is then applied. It is evident that not only has the shelf 23 been properly positioned wings 35 struck from the, metal of such downward arms. This means serves to position the shelves 23, 24 a desired distance above the top rail sections 21, 22 so that such atop railis easily accessible to receive the hooks of garment hangers and to act as a stop on .the arms 33 and 24 .so. that the nuts 34, 34' can be tightened and the assembly made secure.

The shoe rack members 27, 28 are each of said rod stock formed. in the shape of an F and may have more than the' usual two horizontal arms of the standard F-form to be comb-like; the number of such added arms which are not shown, depending on their desired closeness andthe width of the frame 16. All distal ends have a downwardly bent portion, with those at the joint in the lower rail sections 25, 26, longer than the rest and such may also. be the case at 36, so as to receive the nuts 37. All such downward arms shall have the wings 35 and. those arms which are in engagement-with the said lower rail sections 25, 26 shall be in acute angle relation with the horizontal arms of the F-form so that such arms shall lie in a plane which slopes downwardly forwardly of the frame 16. The elements of the shoe rack members 27, 28, are provided with the Wings 35. It is evident that not only have the shoe rack members been properly positioned and securely mounted, but that also effected was the secure assembly of the bottom rail sections 25 and 26.

The shelves 23 and 24 may be provided with a hook at their remote front corners respectively as shown at 39. The numeral 40 denotes braces which are usually included to sturdy the frame 16 on the members 17, 18. Provision may be had to have these braces detachable and the members 17, 18 removable to accomplish a small compact package of all the parts in knockdown condition for shipment and storage. Such is well known in the art and since no claim is made therefor; is not illustrated, because same is readily understandable and well known to those versed in the art.

This invention is capable of numerous forms and various applications without departing from the essential features herein disclosed. It is therefore intended and desired that the embodiments shown be deemed illustrative and not restrictive and that the patent shall cover all patentable novelty herein disclosed; reference being had to the following claims rather than to the specific description herein to indicate the scope of this invention.

We claim:

1. In a garment rack of the character described, foot structure, a substantially rectangular frame mounted upright on said foot structure whereby the top and bottom rails of said frame are horizontal; each of said top and bottom rails comprising two sections; the meeting end portions of the associated sections of each of said top and bottom. rails being in contact; each pair of such associated end portions having a set of aligned holes therethrough; each such set of aligned holes being a single open-ended passage; means through the single passage in the bottom rail, securing the sections of said bottom rail together, a shelf member having two spaced rods extending downwardly therefrom; each of said rods having a lateral protuberance thereon; said protuberances being equi-distant from the plane of the shelf; one of said rods being threaded at its lower end; one of the sections of said top rail having a hole therein spaced from the single passage therein; the threaded rod being positioned through said passage in the top rail and the other rod being positioned with its bottom end in said hole which is in one of the sections of said top rail whereby the said protuberances rest on said top rail and a nut screwed tight on said threaded rod whereby the top rail sections are secured to each other and the shelf is secured to saidtoprail.

2. A garment rack as defined in claim 1, wherein at least one of the meeting end portions of the associated sections of the top and bottom rails respectively, is tubu- 4 lar and in telescopically fitted relation with. its associated end portion.

3. A garment rack as defined in claim 1, wherein said top and bottom rails are tubular and wherein the single hole in the top rail is through the top wall of the top rail section it is in and wherein the threaded rod is longer than the other rod which extends from the shelf.

4. A garment rack as defined in claim 1, wherein said top and bottom rails are tubular and made of the same stock tubing and wherein the inner end sections of said rails, of the telescopically related portions thereof, are of reduced size thereby having a shoulder formed thereon which serves as a stop limiting the length of tubing in telescoping relation; the set of holes in said rails respectively which are to be in alignment, being in alignment when the outer end sections of said rails, of the telescopically related portions thereof are up against said shoulders respectively.

5. A garment rack as defined in claim 1, wherein the means securing the sections of the bottom rail, includes a rod bent into a U-fomn having bends at its distal ends respectively whereby said U-form is provided with end rod portions which are in the same direction angularly to the plane of such U-form; one of the bottom rail rectionsbeing provided with a hole; the axes of said hole and of the single passage in the bottom rail being substantially vertical; said end rod portions having each a lateral protuberance thereon; one of said end rod portions being through said passage and extending downwardly therefrom; such extending lower part of this end rod portion being threaded; the other end rod portion being within said hole in the section of the bottom rail and a nut tightly screwed on said threaded rod end whereby the said protuberances rest on the said bottom rail and whereby the bottom rail sections are secured to each other and the said U-shape is secured to said bottom rail; said U-shape and that portion of the bottom rail which is between the bent ends of said U-member, serving as a shoe rack on the garment rack.

' 6. A garment rack as defined in claim 5, wherein said Uform has an extension along its bight; the foot structure extendingalong the side ends of the frame and having a hole; the distal end of said extension being fitted into said hole; said extension and U-form being a unitary F-form.

7. In a garment rack of the character described, foot structure, a substantially rectangular frame mounted upright on said foot structure whereby the top and bottom rails of said frame are horizontal; each of the said top and bottom rails comprising two sections; the meeting end portions of the associated sections of each or" said top and bottom rails being in contact; each pair of such associated end sections having a set of aligned holes therethrough; each such set of aligned holes being a single open-ended passage; means through the single passage in the top rail, securing the sections of said top rail together, a shoe rack member having two spaced rods extending therefrom; each of said rods having a lateral protuberance thereon; one of said rods being threaded at its end; one of the sections of said bottom rail having a hole therein spaced from the single passage therein; the threaded rod being positioned through said passage in the bottom rail and the other rod being positioned with its free end in said hole which is one section of said bottom rail whereby said protuberances rest against said bottom rail and a nut screwed tight on said threaded rod whereby the bottom rail sections are secured to each other and the shoe rack is secured to said bottom rail.

8. In a garment rack of the character described, foot structure, a substantially rectangular frame mounted upright on said foot structure whereby the top and bottom rails of said frame are horizontal; each of said top and bottom rails'comprising two sections; the meeting end portions of the associated sections of each of the top and bottom rails being in contact; each pair of such associated end portions having a set of aligned holes therethrough; each such set of aligned holes being a single open-ended passage; means through the single passage in one of said rails, securing the sections of such rail together, a member for supporting an article of apparel, having two spaced rods extending therefrom; each of such rods having a lateral protuberance thereon; one of said rods being threaded at its free end; one of the sec tions of the second of said rails having a hole therein spaced from the single passage therein; the threaded rod being positioned through the passage in said second rail and the other rod being positioned with its free end in said hole which is one of the sections of said second rail whereby said protuberances rest on the said second rail and a nut screwed tight on said threaded rod whereby the sections of said second rail are secured to each other and the article-supporting member is secured to said second rail.

9. A garment rack as defined in claim 8, wherein at least one of the meeting end portions of the associated sections of the top and bottom rails respectively, is tubular and in telescopically fitted relation with its associated end portion.

10. A garment rack as defined in claim 8, wherein said top and bottom rails are tubular and wherein the single hole in second rail is through the Wall of such rail and wherein the threaded rod is longer than the other rod which extends from said article supporting member.

11. A garment rack as defined in claim 8, wherein said top and bottom rails are tubular and made of the same stock tubing and wherein the inner end sections of said rails are in telescoping arrangement and are of reduced size thereby having a shoulder formed thereon which serves as a stop limiting the length of tubing in telescopic relation; the set of holes in said rails respectively which are to be in alignment, being in alignment when the outer end sections of said rails, of the telescopically related portions thereof are up against said shoulders respectively.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,015,448 Madden Jan. 23, 1912 1,687,613 Hernacki Oct. 16, 1928 2,463,124 Sims Mar. 1, 1949

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1015448 *Dec 17, 1910Jan 23, 1912Armand S MaddenDisplay-rack.
US1687613 *Sep 7, 1926Oct 16, 1928John HernackiCollapsible hat and coat rack
US2463124 *Oct 1, 1945Mar 1, 1949Sims Joseph AConnection for structural members
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3043440 *Apr 4, 1960Jul 10, 1962Daniel BerlinFolding rack
US3107442 *Dec 26, 1961Oct 22, 1963Harry LevineMultiple board, easel and table combination
US3197035 *Mar 3, 1964Jul 27, 1965Combined Ind IncCollapsible garment rack
US3215280 *Feb 17, 1964Nov 2, 1965Howe Folding Furniture IncFolding coat rack
US3527361 *Oct 3, 1968Sep 8, 1970New York Wire Works LtdLocking joint structures for garment racks
US4108316 *Mar 31, 1976Aug 22, 1978Norman Slater, Inc.Interconnectible structural tubular members
US6817478 *Dec 14, 2001Nov 16, 2004Frank Venegas, Jr.Modular office furniture
US7644527Jul 13, 2007Jan 12, 2010Target Brands, Inc.Multi-panel billboard accessory
US7946435 *Apr 4, 2008May 24, 2011Target Brands, Inc.Fixture accessories
US8191720Apr 18, 2011Jun 5, 2012Target Brands, Inc.Method of assembling fixture accessories
US8434630Jun 4, 2012May 7, 2013Target Brands, Inc.Merchandising system and method of assembly
US8714597 *Oct 1, 2008May 6, 2014United Pipeline Systems, Inc.Welded joint for lined pipe and components thereof
US20100170861 *Sep 4, 2008Jul 8, 2010Hinckley Randy LRound table storage rack
US20100207380 *Oct 1, 2008Aug 19, 2010Ina Acquisition Corp.Welded joint for lined pipe and components thereof
US20140239587 *Feb 28, 2013Aug 28, 2014Eastpoint Sports Ltd., LlcHorseshoe game caddy
Classifications
U.S. Classification108/28, 211/182, 211/186, D06/681.2
International ClassificationA47G25/06, A47G25/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47G25/0664
European ClassificationA47G25/06E