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Publication numberUS2896814 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 28, 1959
Filing dateDec 12, 1957
Priority dateDec 12, 1957
Publication numberUS 2896814 A, US 2896814A, US-A-2896814, US2896814 A, US2896814A
InventorsAltenburg William M
Original AssigneeDiamond Gardner Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bottle carrier
US 2896814 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 28, 1959 w. M. ALTENBURG 2,896,814

BOTTLE CARRIER 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Dec. 12, 1957 L k BY REL, 1C3

' ATTORNEY July 28, 1959 Filed Dec. 12 1957 w. M. ALTENBURG 2,896,814

BOTTLE CARRIER 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR BY Kmu. QQS

ATTORNEY BOTTLE CARRIER William M. Altenburg, South Windham, Maine, assignor to Diamond Gardner Corporation, a corporation of Delaware Application December 12, 1957, Serial No. 702,351

2 Claims. (Cl. 220-116) This invention relates to package carriers, and more particularly to an inexpensive integral one-piece paper pulp molded carrier for a plurality of containers having upwardly extending necks.

Prior to the instant invention, it has been found de sirable to provide carriers for bottles or cans ofrsoft drinks and similar liquids. This has been done in order to enable a purchaser to easily carry a number of such bottles or cans with him with a minimum of danger of breakage of the bottle or can by it being inadvertently dropped. The prior art carriers have often taken the form of a folded chip board device which is usually secured together by an adhesive and/or staples. Such devices required die cutting, folding, gluing, or stapling operations, all of which are inherently expensive. Attempts of the prior art to to make the carrier less expensive by avoiding or eliminating some the above-noted operations have resulted only in relatively weak carriers which sometimes either tore while being carried or else permitted a bottle to topple out of them, and thus to become broken.

It is further to be noted that the cans or bottles which customarily have been used for the packaging of soft drinks and the like have either glued, printed or lithographed thereon a display denoting the company which manufactured the drink or else, and sometimes in addition, the type of drink contained in the bottle or can. Prior art carriers, however, have generally been formed in a. widely used type, with bottle receiving pockets which conceal to a large measure the advertisement of the side of the bottle or can. In order to overcome this disadvantage, such prior art bottle carriers have been printed with the company name, etc. so that the cost was increased for this reason also.

Other types of bottle and can carriers have been known which support the bottles or cans from the neck thereof, but these known carriers have not provided any structure which would separate the bottles and cans and prevent them from hitting against each other. Thus, these prior art carriers have not only been expensive but have also the additional objectional feature of not being protective of the bottle or can being carried.

It is to be further noted that the prior art bottle carriers have generally been manufactured only in such size as to carry six bottles, generally two rows of three bottles each. The handle extended from between the two rows, so that the package balanced. However, the prior art has generally failed to provide a carrier for only three bottles; this is of particular importance in view of the fact that the larger sizes of soft drink bottles are often sold in a price grouping of three units for a particular amount.

It is to be further noted that prior art bottle carriers have usually been put into operation at the bottling plant where the beverage bottle is filled with liquid. However, it is desirable to have the empty beverage bottle shipped from the bottle manufacturer to the bottling plant already encased in the carrier in which it will be sold to the retail customer. My new bottle carrier is constructed in novel fashion so that it can meet the empty beverage bottle United States Patent lice at the bottle manufacturing plant and help to protect it during shipment to the bottling plant. Furthermore, my new bottle carrier is so constructed that the bottle can be filled without removing it from the carrier. My new carrier holds a single line of beverage bottles and 00- operates in novel manner with most filling machines in operation today as these filling machines generally operate on a single line of bottles, whereas, most prior art carriers could not pass through a bottling machine designed for single line operation.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a carrier for a single row of beverage bottles.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a bottle or can carrier which can be manufactured on easily fabricated dies by conventional molded pulp technique.

Another object of the present invention is the provision of a bottle carrier which can be manufactured at a very low unit cost.

Yet another object of the present invention is to pro vide a bottle carrier in which the bottles can be inserted with a minimum of time and effort.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a bottle carrier in which the bottles are protected from bumping against one another or from bumping against bottles in adjacent carriers during handling or during shipment.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a bottle or can carrier which may be handled and carried easily.

Still another object of the present invention is the provision of a bottle carrier which requires. no assembly operation at the point of use, and which may be readily nested for shipment from the point of manufacture to the bottling works or wherever the bottles will be inserted into the carrier.

A still further object of the present invention is the provision of a bottle or can carrier in which the label of the bottle or can is visible when the bottles or cans are positioned in the carrier.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a carrier for a single row of beverage bottles which carrier can meet the bottles at the bottle manufacturing plant and protect them during shipment to the point of filling with a beverage.

It is a (further object of this invention to provide a single row carrier for beverage bottles so that the bottles can be sent through a single row filling machine without any'or without extensive modification of the filling machine and without removing the empty bottles from the bottle carrier prior to filling.

Other objects and the nature and advantages of the instant invention will be apparent from the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a carrier in accordance with the present invention, with three bottles positioned therein;

Fig. 2 is a front elevation of the carrier of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a rear elevation of the carrier of Fig. 1 with the section thereof in extended position;

Fig. 4 is a side view showing how two of the carriers of the present invention can be used to carry six bottles;

Fig. 5 is a side view showing how the carrier of the present invention can be used to protect the bottles during shipment;

Fig. 6 is a side view of a plurality of carriers in accordance with the present invention in nested position;

Fig. 7 is a sectional view taken on line 77 of Fig. 6;

Fig. 8 is a cross-sectional view on the line 8-8 of Fig. 2.; and

Fig. 9 is a cross-section on the line 9-9 of Fig. 2.

Referring now to the drawings, wherein like reference numerals are used to designate like or corresponding parts throughout the several views, there is shown in Fig. 1 a carrier -for necked bottles or cans having; a handle section 11 with finger holes 12 and '13 therein. Adjacent handle 11 and denoted therefrom by a fold line 14 is a first neck engaging section 15 having neck receiving openings 16, 17 and 18. Adjacent to neck engaging section 15, and separated therefrom by a fold line 19 is a second neck engaging section 21 having corresponding neck receiving openings 22, 23 and 24 (Fig. 3). Adjacent the neck engaging section 21 and separated therefrom by a fold line 26 is a body section 27. Body section 27 has a generally planar base 28 which has a floor 29 extending at generally right angles thereto. A plurality of separator members 31, 32, 33 and 34 are molded integrally with the base 28 of body section 27, and extend generally perpendicularly thereto, as well as perpendicularly to the bottle-supporting floor 29. As may be seen from Figs. 1, 2 and 3, the separator members 31, 32, 33 and 34 have cylindrical walls which merge generally into the plane of the base 28.

It will be readily understood by those skilled in the art that the bottle carrier 10 of the present invention is readily and inexpensively molded on an open-faced die by conventional molded pulp technique, and when molded has the appearance shown in Fig. 3. For shipping purposes, such as from the point of manufacture to a bottling plant, the carriers 10 are nested to reduce their bulk. Fig. 6 illustrates a stack of nested carriers 10 as they would appear ready for shipment to a bottling plant.

Atthe bottling plant, the carriers 10 are folded on the fold lines 14, 19 and 26 so as to have, generally, the shape shown in Fig. l. The bottles or cans are then inserted into the carrier 10 so that the package has the appearance shown in Fig. 1. For shipment from the bottling plant, a plurality of the carriers 10, with their bottles or cans inserted therein, are placed in the relationship shown in Fig. 5. As will be noted, each of the bottles is protected from engaging any of the other bottles by a layer of molded pulp, the base 28, this constituting a cushioning wall.

At the retail outlet, the purchaser may carry either one or two of the carriers 10 with its bottles with great facility, Fig. 4 illustrating how readily two of the carriers may be handled. It is to be noted in this view that the bottles are protected from bumping against each other, that the bottle labels are not concealed by the carrier (similarly with Fig. l) and that the neck engaging sections 15 and 21 tend to open up due to the Weight of the bottles supported by the floor 29. This results in a clamping action by the neck engaging sections 15 and 21 so that the necks of the bottles or cans are securely held and the bottles or cans are prevented from slipping out of the carriers 10. I

It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that various changes may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention and therefore the invention is not limited to what is shown in the drawings and described in the specification but only as indicated in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. An integral one piece molded pulp carrier having a plurality of necked bottles therein and comprising a body section adapted when in use to be generally vertically extending and having an upper margin, a handle section'upwardly of said body section, said handle section having a lower margin, a pair of neck engaging sections integrally connected along a generally horizontal fold line, 'one of said neck engaging sections being integrally joined to the lower margin of said handle section along a second fold line and the other of said neck engaging sections being integrally joined to the upper margin of said body section along a third fold line, said neck engaging sections constituting the sole connection between said handle section and said body section and extending and converging outwardly of the plane. of said' body section and handle section and having spaced and aligned holes therein, the necked bottles having the necks thereof extending through said holes, whereby when said handle section is lifted, the angle between said neck engaging sections will increase .to thereby clamp the necks of the bottles.

2. The carrier of claim 1, said body section comprising a floor extending outwardly of the plane thereof and underlying said neck engaging sections to support and cushion the bottles in said carrier.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATESPATENTS 2,020,454 Bisbee et al Nov; 12, 1935 2,089,297 Read et a1. Aug. 10, 1937 2,325,955 Higgins Aug. 3, 1943 2,426,689 Hilton Sept. 2, 1947 as w

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2020454 *Oct 18, 1930Nov 12, 1935Canal Nat Bank Of PortlandMolded pulp article
US2089297 *Apr 24, 1935Aug 10, 1937Coulter D YoungBottle spacer
US2325955 *Aug 5, 1941Aug 3, 1943Thilda HigginsInsulated milk bottle cover
US2426689 *May 19, 1945Sep 2, 1947Hilton Grover CArticle display device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2998899 *Jun 9, 1958Sep 5, 1961Cons Molded Products CorpMultiple compartment carrier for beverage containers
US3616976 *Jan 26, 1970Nov 2, 1971Federal Cartridge CorpGun cartridge holder
US5484053 *Jun 22, 1994Jan 16, 1996Riverwood International CorporationBasket-style clip carrier
US6213529 *Oct 18, 1999Apr 10, 2001Marcia L. KurczPropane tank and accessory carrier
WO1995035242A1 *Feb 27, 1995Dec 28, 1995Riverwood International CorporationBasket-style clip carrier
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/142, 229/406, 206/194, 294/87.2, 294/159, 206/168
International ClassificationB65D71/00, B65D71/52
Cooperative ClassificationB65D2571/00697, B65D2571/00296, B65D71/0003, B65D2571/00314, B65D2571/0029, B65D2571/00475
European ClassificationB65D71/00B