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Publication numberUS2898856 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 11, 1959
Filing dateJun 5, 1952
Priority dateJul 6, 1951
Publication numberUS 2898856 A, US 2898856A, US-A-2898856, US2898856 A, US2898856A
InventorsAlexander Lightbody, Morrison Johnston James
Original AssigneeArmstrong Whitworth Co Eng
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Self-projected missiles
US 2898856 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

2 Sheets-Shegt 1 A. LIGHTBODY ET AL SELF-PROJECTED MIssILEs Aug. 11,1959

v Filed June 5. 1952 A. LIGHTBODY4 ETAL SELF-PROJECTED MISSILES Aug. `11, 1959 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Junev 5. 1952 Unite SELF-PROJECTED MISSILES Application June 5, 1952, Serial No. 291,931 Claims priority, application Great Britain July 6, 1951 3 Claims. (Cl. 102-49) This invention relates to a self-projected missile of the kind having discardable, wrapped-round boost motorsi.e., at least two symmetrically-arranged boost motors disposed round the missile, with their axes substantially parallel thereto, to provide acceleration during the initial stage of the flight for a matter of a few seconds, prior to their being discarded.

In practice it is known to use four such symmetrically-arranged boost motors respectively disposed between four main wings of the missile. Alternatively, each boost motor could be replaced by a group of two or more motors.

The object of the invention is to arrange the boost motors in a more satisfactory manner than hitherto, from the aero-dynamic point of view.

According to the invention, the boost motors are disposed with their forward ends substantially in the plane through the forward end `of the missile at right-angles to the axis of the latter.

According to a further feature, the forward ends of the boost motors are secured to the missile just rearwardly of the tapering forward end of the missile, and the rear ends of the motors are also secured to the missile.

According to a still further feature, the forward ends of the boost motors are cones with axes which are symmetrically divergent (forwardly) from the axis of the missile at an angle which is greater, but not much greater, than the maximum design angle of yaw of the missile during boosted ilight.

When applying the invention to a missile in which the boost motors are arranged in groups, for example, groups of two or more motors, the motors of each group may share a common nose, the pointed extremity of which, in plan, lies centrally of the motors of the group, being, in side elevation, outwardly displaced as aforesaid.

In the accompanying drawings:

Figure 1 is a plan yof a self-projected missile having discardable boost motors arranged according to the invention;

Figure 2 is a rear view thereof;

Figure 3 is a front view thereof, but with the boost motors omitted; and

Figure 4 is a perspective View, to a smaller scale, of the missile after the boost motors and retaining means therefor have been jettisoned.

It will be seen from the drawings that the missile has a main cylindrical portion 11 carrying four main planes 12 and four tail planes 13, whilst the nose 14 of the missile is of conical shape. In the present instance there States arent is a pair of boost motors 16, 16 arranged with their trailing ends and delivery nozzles 17 disposed between each adjacent pair of main planes 12. The front ends of the boost motors are secured to the missile by a detachable ring bracket, indicated at 18, the rear ends being secured to the missile by four independent, detachable brackets indicated generally at 19, 19. (The securing means are disclosed in the specification of our co-pending application Serial No. 291,932, led June 5, 1952, now Patent #2,745,347.)

It will be observed from Figure 1 that the forward extremities 21, 21 of the boost motors are in the plane, through the forward extremity 22 of the missile, which is at right-angles to the axis of the latter.

It will also be noted that the forward ends of the boost motors (i.e., the ring bracket 18) are secured to the missile just rearwardly yof the conical front end 14 of the missile.

The forward ends of the boost motors are cones with axes which are symmetrically divergent (forwardly) from the axis of the missile (as shown most clearly at 24 in Figure 1) at an angle which is greater, but not much greater, than the maximum design angle of yaw of the missile during boosted ight.

Lastly, when the boost motors are arranged in pairs, as in the present instance, each group of two motors may share a common nose, as shown most clearly by Figure 1, the pointed extremity 21 of which lies between the two motors of the group, being, in side elevation, outwardly displaced as above-mentioned.

What we claim as our invention and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. A self-projected missile of the kind having discardable, wrapped round boost motors, the forward ends of the boost motors being cones with axes which are sym- 'metrically divergent forwardly from the axis of the missile at an angle which is greater than the maximum design angle Iof yaw of the missile during boosted Hight.

2. A self-projected missile of the kind having discardable, wrapped round boost motors, in which the boost motors are arranged in groups, the motors of each group sharing a common nose having a pointed extremity which, in plan, lies centrally of the motors of the group, all the common noses being cones with axes which are divergent from the axis of the missile.

3. A self-projected missile of the kind having discardable, wrapped round boost motors, in which the boost motors are arranged in groups, the motors of each group sharing a common nose having a pointed extremity which, in plan, lies centrally of the motors of the group, all the common noses being cones with axes which are divergent forwardly from the axis of the missile at an angle which is greater than the maximum design angle of yaw of the missile during boosted flight.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,102,653 Goddard July 7, 1914 FOREIGN PATENTS 229,444 Switzerland Ian. 17, 1944 653,024 Great Britain May 9, 1951

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1102653 *Oct 1, 1913Jul 7, 1914Robert H GoddardRocket apparatus.
CH229444A * Title not available
GB653024A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3079111 *Sep 8, 1960Feb 26, 1963Lambert Engineering CompanyRockets and seat ejecting apparatus
US3088273 *Jan 18, 1960May 7, 1963United Aircraft CorpSolid propellant rocket
US4327885 *Oct 6, 1971May 4, 1982The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyThrust augmented rocket
US4665792 *Aug 6, 1985May 19, 1987The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Air ForceMissile longitudinal support assembly
US4678290 *Aug 30, 1985Jul 7, 1987Welker Engineering CompanyApparatus for visual inspection of closed machinery
US4949918 *Aug 2, 1989Aug 21, 1990Arszman Jerrold HMoment control of rockets
US5245927 *Apr 28, 1992Sep 21, 1993Northrop CorporationDual-tandem unmanned air vehicle system
US7763834 *May 12, 2005Jul 27, 2010Mbda FranceFlying object for observing the ground
US20080245256 *May 12, 2005Oct 9, 2008Bernard TenezeFlying Object for Observing the Ground
Classifications
U.S. Classification102/377, 244/3.24
International ClassificationF42B15/00
Cooperative ClassificationF42B15/00
European ClassificationF42B15/00