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Publication numberUS2899108 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 11, 1959
Filing dateApr 17, 1957
Publication numberUS 2899108 A, US 2899108A, US-A-2899108, US2899108 A, US2899108A
InventorsRobert S. Knapp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Self-cleaning and metering liquid spray valve structure
US 2899108 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 11, 1959 s. KNAPP 2,899,108

SELF-CLEANING AND METERING LIQUID SPRAY VALVE STRUCTURE Filed April 1'7, 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 5g 2 AZ 5 a2 2? 2 9 15: Knapp Sts Unite SELF-CLEANING AND METERING LIQUID SPRAY VALVE STRUCTURE Robert S. Knapp, St. Louis, Mo., assignor to Knapp- Monarch Company, a corporation 'of Missouri The present invention relates generally to a spray valve structure, and particularly to spray valve structures of the type adapted to be mounted on a canister of liquid under gas pressure for spraying the liquid in the form of an aerosol. The present disclosure constitutes a continuation-in-part of my earlier filed applications, Serial No. 416,224, filed March 15, 1954, and Serial No. 552,- 365, filed December 12, 1955, both now abandoned.

In customary aerosol valve constructions, a narrowly constricted flow section generally occurs at some point along the flow path from the liquid reservoir to the valve orifice. The nature of the liquid substances sprayed by such devices is often such that clogging occurs at some point of narrow constriction or at the valve orifice itself.

It is a primary object of the present invention, therefore, to provide a spray valve structure wherein a slidable cleaning pin is moved through the valve orifice in a novel and automatic manner along an arcuate path upon each actuation of the spraying device.

It is another object of this invention to provide novel means for mounting a valve cleaning pin in structures of this type whereby lifting of the regulating valve from its valve seat simultaneously effects cleaning of the flow passage and valve orifice.

It is a further object of this invention to provide metering valve means automatically actuated and controlled by a valve cleaning pin of the aforesaid type, whereby a regulated metered quantity of aerosol will be dispensed and the main valve will be cleaned upon each actuation thereof.

With these and other objects in view, my invention consists in the construction, arrangement and combination of the various parts of my self-cleaning liquid spray valve structure whereby the objects contemplated are obtained as hereinafter more fully set forth, pointed out in my claims and illustrated in the accompanying drawing, wherein:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of a valve assembly and container with a cutaway portion showing the syphon tube extending to the bottom of the container;

Figure 2 is a cross-sectional view in side elevation of a spraying valve constructed in accordance with the present invention, and showing the valve in a closed flow position;

Figure 2a is a horizontal cross-sectional view taken substantially as indicated along the line 2a-2a in Figure 2;

Figure 3 is a fragmentary view of a portion of the valve structure shown in Figure 2, showing the valve in an open flow position;

Figure 3a is a horizontal cross-sectional view taken substantially as indicated along the line 3a3a in Figure 3.

Figures 4 and 5 are cross-sectional views, similar to Figure 2, showing a further embodiment of the present invention incorporating an automatic metering valve feature.

Referring now more particularly to Figures 1 to 3 of numeral 18 to designate a sheet metal container or a canister adapted to hold a liquid and a gas under presatent ice sure. The contents of such a canister may consist of insecticide, germicide, deodorant, paint or other similar liquids to be sprayed in the form of an aerosol. A space is provided above the surface of the liquid for Freon or other gas under pressure for displacing the liquid upwardly through a syphon tube 12. My valve structure is substantially similar to that shown in Kochner Patent 2,600,661, except for the particular mounting of a cleaning pin in novel manner, which will be hereinafter described in detail. Reference may be had to the aforesaid patent for a detailed description of various structural features relating to valve constructions of the general type illustrated by the present drawing, but not described in detail herein.

The valve includes a collar 14 suitably secured in a top opening of the canister 10. The collar 14 is internally screw-threaded to receive a valve stem 16 having a threaded end 17 and a reduced diameter extension 18. A packing washer and support means 19 serves to seal the valve stem 16 relative to the collar 14. A hinged bracket 20 and suitable connecting washers serve to back the packing washer 19.

The bracket 20 provides a pair of upwardly extending ears 26 upon which a channel-shaped lever 22 is pivotally carried by means of a pin '24. A coil spring 27 provides laterally extending free ends which engage the lever 22 and the hinged bracket 20, respectively.

A valve sleeve 28 surrounds the extension 18 of the valve stem 16. The sleeve 28 is formed with an axial bore having enlarged counterbores at its opposite ends. A sealing washer 30 is disposed within the lower counterbore and serves to secure the sleeve in axially slidable relation to the extension 18. A sealing disc 32 is carried in fixed relation within the upper counterbore of the sleeve 28, and cooperates with a valve seat 33 at the terminal end of the valve stem extension 18. A cap portion or body shank 34 is fixedly secured to the upper end of the sleeve 28 and provides a means for attaching the sleeve 28 to the lever 22.

It will be apparent that movement of the valve sleeve 28 upwardly about the valve stem extension 18, from the closed valve position shown in Figure 2 to the open valve position shown in Figure 3, will effect a valving operation for dispensing liquid in an aerosol spray. An annular flow passage 36 communicates with the valve seat 33 to permit flow of gas and liquid outwardly through a discharge port 37.

The valve stem extension 18 is formed with a longitudinally extending tubular flow passage 40 of restricted diameter. A cleaning pin 42 is adapted to extend through the flow passage 40. The relative diameters of the pin 42 and the passage 40 are predetermined to provide a restricted flow passage therebetween (indicated at 43 in Figure 2a) of suitable cross-sectional area for effecting a metering of fluid flow when dispensed as desired.

The sealing disc 32 is preferably formed of relatively hard rubber or the like, and receives centrally therethrough the upper end of the cleaning pin 42. The sealing disc 32 tightly engages the cleaning pin 42 and fixedly holds it in perpendicularly downwardly extending relation therefrom. The upper end of the cleaning pin 42 terminates in an enlarged head portion 44- which abuts against the top surface of the sealing disc 32 and is received within a mating recess 45 formed in the shank 34. In this manner, the cleaning pin 42 is fixedly secured in perpendicularly aligned relation relative to the sealing disc 32 and the shank 34, whereby raising and lowering of the shank 34 by actuation of the lever 22 serves also to effect raising and lowering of the pin 42 within the flow passage 48.

In the practical operation of the construction shown, a lever lock 22a is removed by movement toward the right '3 as seen 'in'Figure' 2, and manual pressure is exerted downwa'r'dly uponth'e' lever'22 so as to'efiect'itsrotation'in' a clockwise direction about the pivot 24. Such depression .of the lever 22 is opposed by the coil spring 27 which is outwardly. biased so as to provide a sufiicientforcein' a counter clo'ckwisedirection to counteract the pressure of fluid withinthe canister tendingto'unse'at the. sealing 'disc32.

As clearly shown by the dot-dashdirectional line A- A of Figure 3 of the drawing, "the valve .head movesin'an arcuate path, about the laterally displaced'pivot point provided bythe pin "24, .when elevated 'by'manual depressing of the lever '22. It is a highly important aspect of the present invention that the path of valve'head'raising and lowering is an arcuate one rather than oneof axialalignment relative .to the'valve seat 33. The sealing washer 30, whichserves to secure the valve head for sliding movementalong theextension 18, alsoservesat 'the same time to permit arcuately lateral shifting of the valve sleeve 28 relative to'the extension 18. It is necessary that the sealing washer 30 be formed of suitable're- -silient material-so as to maintain relatively tight sliding contact with. theextensionlS, whileibeing sulficiently compressible to enable angular orientation of 'the'valve sleeve" 28 relative to the extension 18.

It will be apparent, therefore,.that the sealing'disc"32 moves progressively laterally to one side of the valve seat 33 in an arcuate path as it is raised'therefrom 'during valve opening movement. This characteristic laterally arcuate'shifting of the.disc 32 relative to' the seat"33 cooperates with the "particular fixed mounting oft'the .cleaning pin42 for movement with the valve head so as to achieve a rocking or arcuate movement of "the pin through the valve seat during opening and closing movement of the valve. For this. purpose, it is essential that .the cleaning pin 42 be tightly gripped by' thesealingidisc "32 in substantially rigid perpendicular relation.

As clearly seen by acomparison' of Figures 2a and 3a of the drawing, the restricted flow passage'43 is normally .of-substantially circular annular. form, with. the pin42 concentrically disposed therein, whenthevalve is closed, and'the passage 43 is of relatively crescent'shape with the pin 42 angularly disposed against the side .oflthe .passage toward the'pivot"24, when the valve. is opened.

It will be apparent 'thatthe lateral shifting of the .pini42 as it"wipes through-an arcuate path. during valve actuation serves toeffectively preventclogging and obstruction of the flow. passage 43. Mereaxial movement of a straight pin in a straight passage cannot serve to insure such'elfective cleaning operation.

It will be apparent that simultaneously with each actuation of the lever"22 for effecting a spraying operation, "the valve head operates to automatically slide the cleaning pin'42 carried thereby in anarcuate path Within the 1 tubularflow passage4t) relative. tothe' valve seat".33. 'Each'manually actuated dispensing operation, therefore, causes ithe valve to. perform its own .automatic self-clean- "ingfunction' by'means'of the raising and-lowering of the pin'42.

' Referring now more particularly to Figures .4 and of 'the drawing, I haveillustrated a further embodiment of "the present invention. A majority of the parts illustrated inthisfurther embodiment correspond identically with certain of'the parts already described in connection with the'ernbodimentof Figures 2 and 3. For purposes of sim- "plification,..identical parts in the structure of Figures 4 .and 5 have been given the same numbers as-are applied to. the parts previously described. Only the .difi'erent and additional structural features of .this:secondembodiment will now be described.

-. ..In. the .practical application of awhighq .pressure aerosol device :having the self-cleaning feature of :thepresent -invention, it is frequently necessary to establish. a. control ..of..the particulan quantityiofi spray. dispensed by. a single .actuationof thepivoted lever-.22. For example; b11116 spraying of certain interior spaces, such as the introduction of'an insecticide within an aircraft cabin, it ishighly advantageous to insure the dispensing of no more than an accurately predetermined quantity. In this way, the adverse elfects of excessive spraying in a confined space are prevented.

Although various complex: metering valves for aerosol .devices have been suggested in the past, the present in- Iadjacent'the upper end of the tube"50, and the head end T56thereof is received in tight friction fitting insertion within a modified form of valve stem 16. The internal threading 'of'the valvestem' 16 ofFigures 2 and 3 has been"eli1'ninated inrthe valve stem16', and alowermost 'dip portion'162is pro'vided for turning .under. and into the reduced tube neck"54. "The valve. stern16',is otherwise identical with the valve stem 16. In this way, thesyphon .tub'e"50 is maintained in secure and liquidtight relation within the valve stem16' and in flow communication with the main valve parts thereabove.

An'enlarged recess 58 is .defined within the valve stem 16'.-above the .head:end 56 ofthe dip tube 50. Anup- \varidly and conically tapered restriction 60 is provided between the recess"58 and the flow passage 40, through which' the cleaning. pin" 42 extends downwardly.

A metering ball valve member64 is' disposed within the valve stem recess 58 in supported relation upon a coil spring 66. The lower end of the spring 66 seats upon .the upper annular'rim of the dip tube, head 56, and' the upper .endthereof nestin'gly receives and holds'the ball valve 64. The pointed lower-end of the cleaningpin "42' shown in'Figures'Z and 3 is blunted to provide an otherwise identical cleaning pin 42 forabutting engage- .ment of its lowermost end upon the ball valve-64.

"The length of the pin42' is selected so as to engage .the ball valve 64 and move it downwardly. againstthe bias of'the spring 66 in spaced-relation tothe conical restriction'60 when the main valve parts are in closed position, as seen in Figure 4 of the drawing. In this way the bias of the spring 27 maintains the. main .valve. disc "32 seated, and also maintains the metering valve. partsin assembled relation. It will I be apparentithat. a ,flow

passage is provided around the ball valve 64.up.wardly into the flow passage '40 when the main valve. is. closed.

" When the lever' 22 is depressed to effect dispensing. of

i a spray, the cleaning pin.42 will.be.carried in. its previously described arcuate pathupwardly. throughthe .flow passage 40, and the sealing 'disc 32 ,will beunseated from thevalvestem. extension. 18, instheusame-manner as described in Figures land 3. At the same. time, the spring :66 .will: beifree. to liftnthet ball valve- 64 upwardly :into

seating engagement within the conical taper 60 which acts as a.valveiseat,thereby-effecting avalved closureuof the upward dispensing flow, as seen in-Figure SrOf lhGdlflW- mg.

It-will abe apparentsthat-rthe length of the-pin-,4Z,n=and therefore the corresponding position-of themeterdng ball .valve 64,.maybezselected; so asto .-secure-. a single; dis- :charge 'ofafiuid liquid-spray .in-the desired amountgforz an -.individual..dispensing -burst. -By thus :.controlling the .amountdischarged through a zsingle pressureon the:lever ..22,..it is possible to aregulate a desired:rtotal'rdosage"l'by selecting the number of times that the lever 22 is.;to;be

'hsuccessively depressed i111; any given situation.

The-cooperating;geometryofthe conical restriction 7 :60;and the-ballvalve .64 serves to.insure;guiding..confine- Inna .4

ment of longitudinal valve movement despite lateral forces which may be exerted upon the valve by the cleaning pin. The employment of a valve of ball shape is of particular importance in insuring eflicient cooperative actuation of the valve because of the arcuate nature of the path of reciprocation of the cleaning pin 42. The inherent lateral shifting of the free end of the cleaning pin is readily accommodated without risk of binding or excessive wear because of the freely rotatable engagement between the ball valve 64 and both the conical restriction 60 and the cleaning pin 42.

Through the use of the present invention it is possible to maintain effective self-cleaning operation and supplemental automatic flow metering with a highly efficient, reliable and low cost structure. Expensive or hazardous liquids may be carefully dispensed in accurately predetermined quantities, thereby insuring uniform application of a spray in each and every operation.

While there has been shown and described a particular embodiment of this invention, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that various changes and modifications may be made therein without departing from the invention and, therefore, it is intended in the appended claims to cover all such changes and modifications as fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention.

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. In a spraying valve structure, a valve stem having a flow passage therethrough terminating at its one end in a valve seat and at its other end in a port adapted to communicate with a reservoir of liquid under pressure, a sealing valve mounted for movement relative to said valve seat to open and close the valve seat end of said flow passage and being normally biased toward said valve seat to close said flow passage, a cleaning pin carried by said sealing valve and extending into said flow passage for reciprocating movement therethrough, a metering valve normally spaced from the port end of said flow passage when the sealing valve is normally seated against said valve and also being normally biased toward the said port end of said flow passage and tending to close said port, said cleaning pin being greater in length than said flow passage so as to extend through said port to engage said metering valve and maintain it in said spaced relation to said port when said sealing valve is in its normally closed position, the spacing of said metering valve from the port end of said flow passage being substantially equal to the distance of the sealing valve from the valve seat when the sealing valve is in open position, so that upon movement of said sealing valve to an open position said cleaning pin will be withdrawn from said port and said metering valve will be free for movement to close said port, whereby dispensing flow of liquid, cleaning movement of said cleaning pin, and metering movement of said metering valve are eflected simultaneously.

2. In a spraying valve structure, a valve stem having a restricted fiow passage therethrough terminating at its one end in a valve seat and at its other end in an enlarged flow passage adapted to communicate with a reservoir of liquid under pressure, said enlarged flow passage being conically narrowed toward said restricted flow passage, a sealing valve mounted for movement relative to said valve seat to open and close said restricted flow passage at its valve seat end and being normally biased toward said valve seat to close said flow passage, a cleaning pin carried by said sealing valve and extending into said How passage for reciprocating movement therethrough, a

metering valve of generally spherical shape disposed in said enlarged flow passage and being normally spaced from valving engagement with said flow passage when the sealing valve is normally seated against said valve seat and also being normally biased toward said other end of said restricted flow passage and tending to effect valving engagement within said conically narrowed portion, said cleaning pin being greater in length than said restricted flow passage so as to extend into said conically narrowed portion to engage said metering valve and maintain it in said spaced relation to said conically narrowed portion when said sealing valve is in its normally closed position, the spacing of said metering valve from valving engagement with said conically narrowed portion being substantially equal to the distance of the sealing valve from the valve seat when the sealing valve is in open position, so that upon movement of said sealing valve to an open position said cleaning pin will be withdrawn from said conically narrowed portion and said metering valve will be free for movement into valving engagement within said conically narrowed portion, whereby dispensing flow of liquid, cleaning movement of said cleaning pin, and metering movement of said metering valve are effected simultaneously.

3. In a spraying valve structure, a valve stem having a flow passage therethrough terminating at its one end in a discharge valve seat and at its other end in a metering valve seat adapted to communicate with a reservoir of liquid under pressure, a sealing valve mounted for movement relative to said valve seat to open and close said flow passage, an operating lever secured to said sealing valve and pivotable about a point laterally spaced from said valve seat, biasing means associated with said operating lever and normally biasing said operating lever and sealing valve secured thereto toward said valve seat to close said flow passage, a cleaning pin carried by said sealing valve and extending into said flow passage for reciprocating movement therethrough, said cleaning pin and flow passage being dimensioned so as to provide a metering flow channel therebetween, whereby actuation of said lever serves to raise and lower said sealing valve to control flow through said metering flow channel and to simultaneously reciprocate said cleaning pin along an arcuate path through said flow passage, a metering valve normally biased toward said metering valve seat tending to normally close same, said cleaning pin being greater in length than said flow passage and extending beyond said metering valve seat and engaging said metering valve and normally maintaining it in spaced relation to said metering valve seat when said sealing valve is in its normally closed position, the spacing of said metering valve from its valve seat being substantially equal to the distance of the sealing valve from its valve seat when the sealing valve is in open position, so that upon manual movement of said sealing valve in opposition to said biasing means to an open position said cleaning pin will be withdrawn from projecting through said metering valve seat and said metering valve will be free for movement to close said metering valve, whereby dispensing flow of liquid, cleaning movement of said cleaning pin, and metering movement of said metering valve are efiected simultaneously with the manual movement of said sealing valve.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,600,661 Kochner June 17, 1952 2,623,784 Christen Dec. 30, 1952 2,723,055 Beard Nov. 8, 1955

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2600661 *Jul 23, 1949Jun 17, 1952Knapp Monarch CoSpraying valve structure
US2623784 *Nov 3, 1949Dec 30, 1952E C I Handels Und Ind AnstaltPerfume atomizer
US2723055 *Sep 1, 1950Nov 8, 1955Risdon Mfg CoMetering-valve for aerosol-spray dispensers
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6364177 *Sep 1, 2000Apr 2, 2002Item Products (Npd) LimitedAccessories for use with aerosol containers
US7124915 *Jun 7, 2004Oct 24, 2006The Fountainhead Group, Inc.Handle assembly for providing a controllable discharge stream direction from a pressure container while maintaining a stable center of mass of the pressure container
US8074846 *Aug 11, 2004Dec 13, 2011Tekni-Plex, Inc.Dispenser or vial pump and a tube and valve assembly used in such
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/151, 239/123, 251/339, 222/402.15, 251/338, 222/501
International ClassificationB65D83/14
Cooperative ClassificationB65D83/54
European ClassificationB65D83/54