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Publication numberUS2899543 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 11, 1959
Filing dateAug 30, 1957
Publication numberUS 2899543 A, US 2899543A, US-A-2899543, US2899543 A, US2899543A
InventorsArnold R. Rasmussen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
X t table lamp and shade
US 2899543 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. R. RASMU-SSEN 2,899,543

- TABLE LAMP AND SHADE Aug. 11, 1959 j Filed Aug. 30 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Arnold R Rasmussen" IN VEN TOR.

Aug. 11, 1959 A. R. RASMUSSEN 2,899,543

TABLE LAMP AND SHADE 2. Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Aug. 50. 1957 Fig.3

94 Arnold R Rasmussen Fig.6 92 INVENTOR.

av A

TABLE LAMP AND SHADE Arnold R. Rasmussen, Sharon, N. Dak.

Application August 30, 1957, Serial No. 681,241

1 Claim. (Cl. 240-108) This invention relates in general to new and useful improvements in illuminating devices, and more specifically to an improved table lamp and shade.

In many places about the home it is desired to place a lamp which is decorative and at the same time which will give off suflicient light without glare. This is particularly true of the lamp which in many homes is placed upon the television set. However, the average lamp which may be bought today either is specifically designed for indirect lighting or is designed for its ornamental value and in no way provides a suflicient amount of light without glare.

It is therefore the primary object of this invention to provide a table lamp which is both ornamental and which is so constructed whereby it will provide an ample amount of light without glare.

Another object of this invention is to provide an improved shade construction for table lamps, the shade being so constructed whereby a major portion of the light emitting from a light bulb disposed within the shade is directed into the room and at the same time the light bulb is directly shielded from the room by means of the shade so as to prevent direct light rays and thus resulting glare.

Another object of this invention is to provide an improved shade construction which is ornamental in appearance and at the same will produce the desired amount of light without glare, the shade construction being of such a nature whereby the size thereof may be varied as desired without detracting from its ornamental appearance or its light transmitting characteristics.

A further object of this invention is to provide a table lamp and shade construction, the table lamp including a base having extending upwardly therefrom a standard which carries at the upper end thereof a bulb receptacle, there being carried by the standard intermediate the base and the bulb receptacle support frames for a light shade, the shade being of such a nature whereby it enhances the appearance of the table lamp and at the same time is functional in that it eliminates the glare from a light bulb carried by the bulb receptacle.

These together with other objects and advantages which will become subsequently apparent reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout and in which:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of the table lamp and light shade which is the subject of this invention and shows the general appearance of the same;

Figure 2 is a top plan view of the table lamp and light shade of Figure 1 and shows the general crosssection of the light shade;

Figure 3 is an enlarged vertical sectional view taken substantially upon the plane indicated by the section line 3-3 of Figure 2 and shows the specific details of construction of both the table lamp and the shade;

Figure 4 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional View taken substantially upon the plane indicated by the section line 4-4 of Figure 3 and shows the specific connection between a shade element, a frame member and a retaining clip of the light shade;

Figure 5 is a perspective View of one of the frame members of the light shade and shows the specific details thereof; and

Figure 6 is an enlarged perspective view of a retaining clip.

Referring now to the drawings in detail, it will be seen that there is illustrated the table lamp and light shade which is the subject of this invention, the entire assembly being referred to in general by the reference numeral 10. The table lamp is referred to in general by the reference numeral 12 whereas the light shade is referred to in general by the reference numeral 14.

The table lamp 12 includes a base which is referred to in general by the reference numeral 16. The base 16 is formed of a plurality of circular plates 18, 20 and 22, the plates decreasing in diameter upwardly from the bottom plate .18. The plates 18, 20 and 22 may be separate blocks of wood or the like secured together in any desired manner or, if desired, may be molded in a single piece.

The bottom plate 18 is provided with a transverse bore 24 for the reception of an electrical cord 26. Further, the central part of the bottom plate 18 is provided with an enlarged opening 28 into which the bore 24 enters. The intermediate plate 20 is provided with a large central bore 30 which opens downwardly into the bore 28, the bore 30 being of a smaller diameter than the bore 28. The upper plate 22 also includes a central bore 32.

Extending downwardly through the central bore 32 is a tubular standard 34. The standard 34 has the lower end thereof provided with external threads 36 on which there is received a nut 38 which engages the underside of the plate 22 so as to retain the standard 34 in place.

The upper end of the standard 34 carries a bulb receptacle 40 which may be of any conventional type. The bulb receptacle 48 is connected to the upper end of the standard 34 by means of a threaded connection 42.

Resting upon the upper plate 22 and surrounding an intermediate portion of the standard 34 is an ornamental spacer 44. Carried by the standard 34 intermediate the ornamental spacer 44 and the bulb receptacle 48 are bases 46 of a plurality of identical frame members 48. Inasmuch as the frame members 48 are identical, only one of the frame members 48 will be described in detail here.

Referring now to Figure 5 in particular, it will be seen that each individual frame member 48 is formed from a single sheet of metal and is disposed in an upright position. Each frame member 48 includes a main body portion 50 which is vertically disposed and which is reinforced by a vertical flange 52 along its inner edge. The upper end of the vertical flange 52 is bent to form a loop 54 and the lower end of the vertical flange 52 terminates at the base 46. The base 46 is formed of double thickness by a pair of flanges 55 and 56 and has an opening 58 therethrough receiving the standard 34. The flange 56 is integrally connected to the body portion 50 and the flange 55 is carried by the flange 56. Extending upwardly from the flange 55 in face to face engagement with the body portion 50 is a reinforcing flange 60.

Extending normal to the body portion 50 at the exterior edge thereof and at the bottom thereof is a lower mounting flange 62. The mounting flange 62 terminates in an inwardly directed retaining flange 64. Vertically aligned with the lower flange 62 is an upper flange 66 carried by the upper part of the body portion 50. Like the lower flange 62, the upper flange 64 has an inwardly directed retaining flange 68.

Disposed vertically above the lower flange 62, but outwardly thereof is an intermediate flange 70. The interrnediate flange 70 is provided with an inwardly turned retaining flange 72.

Disposed vertically above the intermediate flange 70 is an intermediate flange 74. The intermediate flange 74 is disposed directly below and outwardly of the flange 66. Like the intermediate flange 70, the intermediate flange 72. is provided with a retaining flange 76.

Carried by a central part of the body portion 50 and disposed outwardly of the intermediate flanges 70 and 74 is a pair of inwardly converging flanges 78 and 80. These flanges intersect at the center of the height of the body portion 50 and are provided with inwardly directed retaining flanges 82 and 84, respectively. It is tobe noted that the junctureof the flanges 78 and 80 is substantially vertically aligned with the flanges 70 and 74. This is best shown in Figure 3.

Referring now to Figures 2 and 3, it will be seen that the frame members 48 are circumferentially spaced and are three in number. The upper parts of the frame members 48 are reinforced by a ring 86 which is received in the socket 54 of the flanges 52. Although three frame members 48 have been illustrated, it is to be understood that the number of frame members 48 will vary according to the size of the shade 14.

Carried by the flanges 62 is a lower shade element 88. The lower shade element 88 is circular in outline and extends the full height of the flange 62. Carried by each of the flanges 62 and engaged both over the shade element 88 and the flanges 62 are a plurality of C-shaped retainers 90 which are best illustrated in Figure 6. Each retainer 90 includes an elongated main portion 92 which terminates at its opposite ends in inturned hook portions 94. The hook portions 94 are engaged over the respective flanges and shade elements and the retainers 90 are retained in place by the respective inturned flanges of the various flanges of the frame member 48.

Referring once again to Figure 3 in particular, it will be seen that there is carried by the flanges 66 an upper shade element 96. The upper shade element 96 is identical with the lower shade element 88 and is disposed in vertically spaced relation thereto.

Disposed above and outwardly of the shade element 88 in concentric relation is a lower intermediate shade element 98. The lower intermediate shade element 98 has the lower portion thereof vertically overlapping the upper portion of the lower shade element 88. Like the shade elements 38 and 96, the shade element 98 is retained in place by a plurality of the retainers 90, the retainers 90 being secured over the flanges 70.

Carried by the flanges 74 and disposed in vertically spaced relation to the lower intermediate shade element 98 is an upper intermediate shade element 100. The shade element 100 is identical with the shade element 98 and is disposed in concentric partially vertically overlapping relation with respect to the upper shade element 96.

Carried by the flanges 78 and 80 is an intermediate central circular shade element 102. The shade element 102 is of a greater diameter than the shade elements 98 and 100 and are disposed in concentric partially overlapping relation with respect to the shade elements 98. Disposed intermediate the shade element 102 and the flanges 78 and 80 is a V-shaped cross-sectional deflector 104. The deflector 104 includes an upper leg 106 and a lower leg 108 which converge at their intersections. The shade elements 102 and 104 are secured to the flanges 78 by means of retainers 110. Each of the retainers 110 includes a central portion 112 which terminates atiits opposite end in hook portions 114. Like the hook portions 94, the hook portions 114 are inturned. However, the angles of the hook portions 114 slightly differ from the hook portions 94 to compensate for the annular relationship of the flanges 78 and 80. l i

From the foregoing description of the shade 14, it will be readily apparent that the shade 14 is of a rigid construction and at the same time is light in weight and ornamental in appearance. It is to be noted that due to the overlap of the various shade elements, light extending downwardly and upwardly from the light bulb 116 carried by the bulb receptacle 40 will strike the intermediate shade elements 98 and and will deflect therefrom onto the outer surface of the shade elements 88 and 96, respectively. The light rays will then be directly downwardly and upwardly, respectively, as is desired. Also, light emitting from the central portion of the bulb 116 will strike the deflector 104 and will deflect the light rays downwardly and upwardly, as the case may be, against the outer surfaces of the intermediate light shades 98 and 100. This light will then be deflected downwardly and outwardly and upwardly and outwardly as desired. Of course, a certain amount of light will be directed downwardly through the shade element 98 and upwardly through the shade element 96. Also, a small amount of light will pass directly between the shade elements 96 and 100, the shade element 100 and the deflector 104, the deflector 104 and the shade element 98, and the shade elements 98 and 88.

The shade elements of the light shade 14 may be formed of any material. If desired, a translucent material may be used or an impervious material may be used. Also, it has been found practical to form either the deflector 104 of a translucent material so that a predetermined amount of light may pass directly therethrough.

It is to be noted that a desired angular relationship exists between the light bulb 116 and the various shade elements due to the overlapping of the shade elements. This relationship may be varied to produce the desired results. Also, it is to be understood that the amount of overlap between the various shade elements will vary depending upon the diameters and heights of the shade elements, this being varied according to ones particular desires and size of the light shade 14.

From the foregoing, it will be readily apparent that there has been devised a table lamp and light shade which is so constructed whereby it is of a rigid construction and at the same time is ornamental. Further, the light shade is of such a construction whereby the maximum amount of light is obtained from the light bulb 116 without glare.

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled inthe art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described, .and accordingly, all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention as claimed.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

A lamp shade assembly comprising a plurality of circumferentially spaced, radially extending upright frame members, each of said frame members including a vertical main body portion having an interior edge and an exterior edge, a lower support extending inwardly from the lower part of each of said body portions, a retaining loop along said interior edge of each of said body portions at the upper end thereof, said lower supports being disposed in overlapping relation and having aligned openings, fastening means extending through said lower supports and connecting said frame members together, a ring extending through said loops and further connecting said frame members together, a series of vertical shade mounting flanges extending normally to said body portions at the exterior edge thereof, adjacent mounting flanges of said series of mounting flanges being positioned at varying distances from said interior edge, like mounting flanges being horizontally aligned, shade elements telescoped over said mounting flanges, and vertically extending C-clips -engaged oversaid shade elements and 5 6 said mounting flanges and securing said shade elements 1,978,251 Doane Oct. 23, 1934 to said mounting flanges. 2,230,186 Johns et a1 Jan. 28, 1941 2,567,336 Hendricks Sept. 11, 1951 References Cited in the file of this patent FOREIGN PATENTS UNITED STATES PATENTS 5 202,009 Great Britain Aug. 7, 1923 1,270,261 Brueggeman June 25, 1918 24.784 Austria Jan. 12, 1931

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1270261 *Jan 28, 1918Jun 25, 1918William I BellLighting-fixture.
US1978251 *May 27, 1932Oct 23, 1934Miller CoLighting appliance
US2230186 *Feb 25, 1939Jan 28, 1941Kenneth E AndrewsAdjustable lamp shade
US2567336 *Jul 17, 1950Sep 11, 1951Raymond ParkerLamp structure with shade and base interlocking member
AT24784B * Title not available
GB202009A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4096555 *Oct 28, 1976Jun 20, 1978Wylain, Inc.Lighting fixtures
US4591960 *Oct 2, 1984May 27, 1986Mwc LightingLighting optical system
US7182486Feb 4, 2005Feb 27, 2007Miracle Mark NHalogen floor lamp with ambient light display
US20040027830 *Aug 7, 2002Feb 12, 2004Er-Shiang ChenLampshade formed by a plurality of rings
US20080030995 *Mar 30, 2007Feb 7, 2008Tai-Shen ChenLamp shade structure
US20160123558 *Oct 29, 2015May 5, 2016Bce Inc.Tower light shield
Classifications
U.S. Classification362/354, D26/112
International ClassificationF21V11/16, F21V11/00
Cooperative ClassificationF21V11/16
European ClassificationF21V11/16