Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2899955 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 18, 1959
Filing dateOct 9, 1957
Publication numberUS 2899955 A, US 2899955A, US-A-2899955, US2899955 A, US2899955A
InventorsIrving Eckman
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Respirator belt
US 2899955 A
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

ug- 18, 1959 r. c:. HuxLEY nl, Erm. 2,899,955

RESPIRATOR BELT Filed Oct. 9, 1957 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG. lI

U l ATTORNEYS Aug. 18, 1'959 T. c. HUxLEY nl, ETAL RESPIRATOR BELT 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Oct. 9, 1957 INVENTORS Mamas C /fz/xey frying Ec/man ATTORNEYS RESPIRATOR BELT 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Oct. 9, 1957 I N V EN TORS Hamas 6. /zlxe BYg ATTORNEYS United States Patent O RESPIRATOR BELT Thomas C. Huxley IH, Manhasset, and Irving Eckman, New York, N .Y., assignors to Conitech Ltd., Chauncey, N.Y., a corporation of New York Application October 9, 1957, Serial No. 689,124

11 Claims. (Cl. 128-30) The present invention relates, in general, to improvements in artificial respiration apparatus and, in particular to improvements in artificial respiration apparatus of the portable type which is adapted to fit over the frontal portion of the patients abdominal and higher regions.

Prior art abdominal belts caused the phenomenon known as paradoxical breathing. ln such breathing there is an expiratory motion in abdominal breathing and an inspiratory motion in the intercostal breathing because the inflated belt depressed the viscera and pushed up the diaphragm of the patient. This is a-n expiratory movement but at the same time the raising of the patients diaphragm tended slightly to raise the rib cage which, in turn, cause an inspiratory movement.

Therefore, it is an object of the present invention to minimize such paradoxical breathing.

Another object is the provision of a belt respirator device which greatly improves the efficiency of the patients breathing.

Another object is the provision of a belt respirator which provides increased support for the weakened back muscles of polio patients, or the like, and therefore obviates the necessity for utilizing separate girdles or similar garments in connection with abdominal belt respirators.

Another object of the present invention is the provision of a respirator belt which is readily adjustable in size and is adapted to encompass a great range of different patient sizes.

A further object is the provision of a belt of the indicated type which is more comfortable to wear than belts of the prior art.

A further object is the provision of an abdominal belt of the above character formed of a plurality of panels in which the inadvertent misplacement or loss of one of the panels is obviated.

A still further object of the present invention is the provision of generally improved artificial respiration apparatus which is light in weight, easy to apply to the patient, and physically comfortable to the patient.

The above and other objects, features and advantages of the present invention will be more fully understood from'the following description considered in connection with the accompanying illustrative drawings.

In the drawings which illustrate the best mode presently contemplated for carrying out the invention:

Fig. l is a front view of an abdominal belt, formed according to they present invention, shown in position on a patient;

Fig. 2 is a rear elevational View of the abdominal belt shown in position on a` patient;

Fig. 3 is a View in elevation of the rear panel of the abdominal belt looking at theinner surface thereof;

Fig. 4 is a view in elevation of the front panel of the abdominal belt looking at the outer surface thereof;

Fig. 5 is a view in elevation of the bladder utilized in the abdominalbelt of the present invention;

ICC

Fig. 7 is a. fragmentary detail view taken inthe area of arrow 7 of Fig. 3 showing the opposite surface of the indicated area of Figure 3;

Fig. 8 is a sectional view on an enlarged scale, taken` on the line 8-8 of Fig. l; and

Fig. 9 is a sectional view on an enlarged scale taken on the line 9 9 of Fig. 4.

Referring now to the drawings in detail, there is shown an abdominal belt 10, pursuant to the present invention, for producing artificial respiration in body encircling relation on the patient P, said abdominal belt being adapted to be operatively associated with a suitable respirator pumping apparatus for rhythmically varying the air pressure applied. to the abdominal belt. Said pumping apparatus may be of any suitable type and is preferably of the type illustrated and described in Patent Number 2,762,366, issued September 11, 19,56 to Huxley and Eckman, and assigned to the assignee of the present invention. As hereinafter described in detail, the abdominal belt respirator 10, which is adapted to be dis-y posed on the patient in body encircling relation, comprises a front panel 12 constituted by an inflatable casing 14, which is adapted to be fitted over the front portion of the patients abdominal region,'and a rear panel 17 which is adapted to be secured to the front panel 12 and fitted over the back of the patient. The casing 14 is adapted to have the air pressure therein rhythmically varied by means of the described air pump for inducing artificial respiration. l t

The front panel 12 is formed of the superposed outer and inner layers 16 and 18 respectively which are formed 0f a flexible fabric material, for example, a suitable textile fabric. The inner or body engaging layer 18 is formed of a softer fabric material than the outer layer 16, said layers constituting the casing 14 and defining a pocket 2l) therebetween. The layers 16 and 18 are secured together along the upper and lower edges 22 and 24, respectively, thereof as by the stitching 26 which also serves to secure a reinforcing or finishing strip 28 about the outer layer 16. The pocket 20 is open at the opposite ends 30 thereof, as best shown in Fig. 8 for the insertion and removal of a Vbladder 32 therefrom.

The bladder 32, which may be formed of any 'suitable flexible fluid impervious material, for example rubber, plastic or the like, comprises a pair of opposing walls34 and 36 which are shaped as best shown in Fig. 5. More specifically, the upper edge 38 of the bag is linear but the bottom and side edges thereof have a curved or arcuate conformation, as indicated at 40, to provide a relatively deep and wide bladder adapted to extend from the groin of the patient upwardly sufficiently to cover the lower rib cage which is generally indicated by the reference numeral 42, as best shown in Figure 6. In orde-r t0 secure the bladder 32 in position in the pocket 20 of the casing 14, the bladder is provided'with the flaps 44 which are formed preferably of the same material as the bladder and which extend laterally from the wall 36 thereof, as best shown in Fig. 5. Each flap 44 is provided with a pair of snap fastener elements 46 releasably engaged with companion snap fastener elements 48. It will be apparent that the companion snap fastener elements 46 and 48 releasably secure the bladder in 4the pocket 20. v

In order to inflate and deflate the bladder 32, provision is made for a tube 50 which extends from the bladder through a slit or opening 52 which is defined in the outer Patented Aug. 18, 1959 2,899,955r f f f from the respirator pumping apparatus. The tube 50 is also provided with a suitable valve device 56 within the opening or slit 52 that operates to prevent valving of the bladder 32 when'the latter is exhausted or deflated. This will serve to permit emptying of the bladder should the slit or opening 52 become twisted in any way.

' It will'be noted that the front panel 12 has a conformation complementary to that of the bladder 32, as best shown in Fig. 4. In this connection, it will be noted that the upper edge 58 of the front panel is linear and that the bottom edge 64) thereof is curved or arcuate and that the vertical extent of the front panel is such that the lower edge -60 thereof is substantially at the patients groin and the upper edge 58 thereof covers the lower rib cage 42 of the patient, asbest shown in Figure 6. In order to rigidify the front panel 12 Yso that the pressure of inflation -of'the bladder 32 will be appliedto the patients abdominal region from the groin up to an area overlying therib cage, so as to'cover the lower rib cage, there are providedthree vertically extending Vinner stays 62 and a pair of outer stays 64. Each of the stays l62 is non-removably disposed in a complementary pocket 66 defined by a` strip Y68 secured to the outer layer 16 of the front panel. The intermediate stay 62 is substantially vertically disposed and the outer stays 64, at the opposite sides of the intermediate stay 62, are disposed at outwardly flaring angles relative thereto.Y The outer or endmost stays 64 are each disposed in a pocket defined by a strip 70 suitable secured, as by sewing to the outer surface of the front layer 16, it being noted, however, that the pockets for thestays 64 are closed at the bottom thereof but are open at the top thereof as at 71. This permits the ready removal of the outer stays 64 from the complementary pockets as may be required. It sometimes occurs that with certain patients the bottom ends of the outer stays 64 may cut into the patients hipbone. If this should occur, the outermost stays 64 can be raised or partially withdrawn from the associated pockets, as shown for example in the left hand Vstay 64 in Figure 4, to a point Where the outer stays 64 will no longer cut into the patients hipbone. The portion of the stay 64 extending from the open end 71 of the associated pocket can then be removed, as by cutting, and a seam can then be sewn across the pocket at the bottom of the raised stay 64 to prevent the return of the stay to the bottom of the pocket.

In order to mount the belt about the patients body, as hereinafter described in detail, the front panel 12 is provided with the three fabric strips or tapes 72A, 72B and 72C which are suitably secured at the front surface thereof and extend transversely of the three pocket defining strips 68. Each of the strips 72 is provided with arst buckle 74 between the center pocket defining strip 68A and the associated pocket defining strip 68C and with a second buckle 76 between said latter strip 68C and the adjacent strip 70. Each strip 72 is also provided with a rst hook 78 between the central pocket defining strip 68A and the associated pocket defining strip 68B and with a second hook 80 ybetween said latter strip and the adjacent pocket defining strip 70, as will be readily apparent from Fig. 4. The functions of said buckles and hooks are hereinafter described in detail.

The rear panel 17 is also formed of flexible sheet material, preferably a textile, being formed of the same material as is the outer layer 16 of the front panel. The rear 'panel 17 has a vertical extent from the coccyx to nearly the shoulder blades. VIt will be noted that the vertical or longitudinal extent ofthe rear panel'is greater than that of the front panel, as Will be readily apparent from Figure 6. Along its upper and lower edges 81 and 82, respectively, the rear panel is provided with the finishing strips 84 and 86 which are suitably secured thereto, preferably as by a sewing operation. The rear panel is also provided with a plurality of vertically extending spaced parallel stays or supports 37, Whh ar@ Similar to the previously mentioned stays 62 and 64 and which are suitably positioned within pockets defined by the fabric strips 88 suitably secured to the underlying fabric of the rear panel 17, as best shown in Figs. 2 and 3.

It will be noted that provision is made for the stays 87A and 87B at each of the opposite ends of the rear panels, and inwardly of each of said stays, a strip 89 is secured to the panel and stitched thereto, as at 90, to

define loops 92, the function of which will presently appear. At the end 94 thereof, the panel 17 is provided with three straps 96 and at its opposite end 98 the panel is provided with two straps 100 and with a band 102 from which there extends the strap 104. The straps 96 are each provided with a buckle 106 which is adjustable longitudinally of the associated strap.A Each buckle 106 is provided with an eyelet 108 whereby each buckle 106 is adapted to `be releasably engaged with an associated one of the previously mentioned hooks 78 or 80, asthe casermay be, for securing the adjustable length belt 96 of the rear panel to the front panel. It will be readily apparent that through the provision of the adjustable buckle 166 and the laterally spaced hooks 78 and 80 associated with each buckle, the belt 10 can be secured at one yside of the patients body and the size thereof adjusted to the patients body. In order to effect the securernent of the belt at the other side of the patients body, and also to further assist in properly adjusting the belt to the patients girth and to properly fit the belt about the patients body, each of the straps 100 and 104 may be readily threaded and secured into one of the associated buckles 74 and 76, as the case may be, as will be readily apparent. Y

When worn about the body of a patient, the belt is positioned on the patient as best shown in Figs. l, 2 and 6. It will be noted that the belt extends both at the front and rear of the patients body from the groin or hip area upwardly so as to also cover the lower rib cage 42 of the patient. Due to the shape of the front and rear panels, as shown in Figs. 3 and 4 the belt extends transversely so as to also cover the desired region of the lower rib cage.

Paradoxical breathing is minimized by the abdominal belt of the present invention due to the fact that it covers the lower rib cage area ofthe patient so that when the bladder 32 is inated, the rib cage is vnot raised. 'In addition, by extending the vertical extent of the belt, especially at the back thereof from the hip to a point where the lower rib cage is covered, and by` providing for the stays 87 in the rear panel, greater support is provided for the back muscles of the patient. This is accomplished by a distribution of the pressure of the belt over a greater area of the patients back so that there Vis present a lower or decreased amount Vof pressure per unit area at the back of the patients body, while at the same time the total pressure at the patients back is i11- creased .to a much greater point than was heretofore possible with belts of the prior art. Further, with two vertical rows of hooks 78 andy 80, as well las two vertical rows of buckles 74 and 76, in combination with the adjustable buckles 106 on the straps 96, the belt can be adjusted to fit a large number of patients with a great variance in girth, so as to eliminate the necessity for stocking various belts of different sizes. In ordinary use, the belt will be removably secured to the patient and removed'by engagement of buckles 106 With hooks 78 and 80 and by disengagement from said hooks.

As previously indicated, the bladder 32 will be inflated and deflated through the action of a respirator pump which provides both suitable positive and negative pressures to the bladder 32 through the conduit 50. The degree of ination and deation and the rate of alternations between such inflation and deflation may be controlled at the respiratorpump in well known manner. The belt respirator 10 facilitates the breathing of the` patient by applying pressure 'in the abdominal region and over the lower'rib cage during the period when Ythe bladder is inflated and the pressure of inflation against the abdomen results in the lifting of the patients diaphragm which takes place during vthe expiration phase of the induced artificial respiration cycle, it being noted in this connection that due to the fact that the belt covers the lower rib cage, the latter is not raised when the bag is inflated and therefore paradoxical breathing is reduced. When the bladder is deflated, the diaphragm is correspondingly lowered to permit air to enter the lungs and this occurs in the inspirational phase of the artificial respiration cycle. The diaphragm is constituted by a movable sheath and when the diaphragm is lowered the thoracic space increases so as to permit air to enter the lungs, this occurring in the inspirational phase of the respiration cycle. Similarly, when the diaphragm is raised, the thoracic space is decreased and causes air to discharge from the lungs, this occurring during the expirational phase of the respiration cycle. The amount of excursion of the diaphragm will determine to a degree the volume of air entering and leaving the lungs and the greater the amount of excursion the greater will be the air exchange. It will be apparent that if the patient has paralyzed abdominal muscles he will be unable to expand and contract the abdominal space and so cannot control the movement of his diaphragm and, in such case, the respirator can aid the patient in breathing in the manner described above. Thus, by rhythmically inflating the bladder 32 of the lrespirator 10 the patients abdomen is rhythmically acted upon so as to contract the abdominal space and raise the diaphragm to effect expiration. With the release of the inflation pressure the diaphragm is permitted to assume thel inspiratory position. The front panel 12 is of a vertical extent to extend substantially upwardly from the pubic crest of the patient above the bottom ribs so as to cover the lower rib cage, the rear panel 17 similarly extending from the hips to a point above the lower ribs to cover the lower rib cage so as to reduce paradoxical breathing, as previously described. l

'Ihe respirator belt of the present invention is not only useful in cases of paralyzed or impaired abdominal muscles but also may be of help in other cases, for example in cases of difficulty in expiration in emphysema cases. As used in the claims, the term abdominal region includes the abdominal region and also the region ofl the lower rib cage. Y

While we have shown and described the preferred embodiments of our invention, it will be understood that various changes may be made in the present invention without departing from the underlying idea or principles of the invention within the scope of the vappended claims.

Having thus described our invention, what we claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

l. Apparatus for producing artificial respiration, comprising a flexible casing adapted to be fitted over the frontal portion of the patients abdominal region, means for releasably securing said casing about the body of the patient in said position, said casing having provision to permit for the passage of fluid into and out of the casing for rythmically expanding and contracting the latter, when the casing is secured about the body of the patient in said position, and said casing having provision to reduce paradoxical breathing, said last mentioned provision being constituted by the longitudinal dimensioning of said casing to extend from the patients groin upwardly to overlie the lower rib cage of the patient, and a panel associated with said casing and adapted to overlie the patients back, said panel being dimensioned to extend from the coccyx to the shoulder blades, said panel having a greater longitudinal extent than said casing.

2. Apparatus for producing artificial respiration, comprising an inflatable casing formed of flexible fabric material and adapted to be fitted over the frontal portion of the patients abdominal region and having a longitudinal extent to cover at least the lower'rib cage of thepatient, said casing being adapted to be rhythmically inflated and deflated for inducing artificial respiration, means for rigidifying said casing whereby the pressure of inflation of the latter will be applied to the patients abdominal region, and means for securing said casing in body yen-V circling position on the patient with said casing fitting over the frontal portion of the patients abdominal region and covering the lower rib cage area thereof, and a rear panel formed of flexible fabric material and associated with said casing to overlie the patients back so as to Ycover the lower rib cage area and to support the patients back muscles from the patients hips upwardly over the lower rib cage area at the patients back. r f

3. Apparatus for producing'artificial respiration, comprising an inflatable casing formed o f flexible fabric material and adapted to be fitted over the frontal portion of the patients abdominal region and having a longitudinal extent to cover at least the lower rib cage of the patient, said casing being adapted to be rhythmically inflated and deflated for inducing artificial respiration, means for rigidifying said casing whereby the pressure of inflation of the latter will be applied to the patients abdominal region, and means for securing said casing in body encircling position on the patient with said casing fitting over the frontal portion of the patients abdominal region and covering the lower rib cage area thereof, and a rear panel formed of flexible fabric material and associated with said casing to overlie the patients back so as to cover the lower rib cage area and to support the patients back muscles from the patients hips upwardly over the lower rib cage area at the patients back, and means to rigidify said back panel.

4. Apparatus for producing artificial respiration, comprising a flexible casing adapted to be fitted over the frontal portion of the patients abdominal region, means for releasably securing said casing about the body of the patient in said position, said casing having provision to permit for the passage of fluid into and out of the casing for rhythmically expanding and contracting the latter when the casing is secured about the body of the patient in said position, the lower marginal edge of said casing being arcuate in conformation and the upper marginal edge of said casing being linear in conformation.

5. Apparatus for producing artificial respiration, comprising a flexible casing adapted to be fitted over the frontal portion of the patients abdominal region, means for releasably securing said casing about the body vof the patient in said position, said casing having provision to permit for the passage of fluid into and out of the casing for rhythmically expanding and contracting the latter, when the casing is secured about :the body of the patient in said position, the lower marginal edge of said casing being arcuate in conformation with the upper marginal edge of said casing being linear in conformation, said casing having a pocket defined therein and a fluid-tight bladder positioned in said pocket and having an opening for the passage of fluid into and out of the bladder for effecting said rhythmical expansion and contraction of the casing, and the upper and lower marginal edges of said bladder being complementary to the upper and lower marginal edges of the casing.

6. Apparatus for producing artificial respiration, comprising a flexible casing adapted to be tted over the frontal portion of the patients abdominal region, means for releasably securing said casing about the body of the patient in said position, said casing having provision to permit for the passage of fluid into and out of the casing for rhythmically expanding and contracting the latter, when the casing is secured about the body of the patient in said position, said casing -having a pocket defined therein, and a fluid-tight bladder positioned in said pocket and having an opening for the passage of fluid into and out of the bladder for effecting said rhythmical expansion and contraction of the casing, and a conduit having one endY thereof'infix'ed securement to saidbladder at s`aid opening` therof andphaving provision at its other end forv releasable connection to a respirator pump.

p 7, Apparatus for producing Varticial respiration, comprising a` flexibleV casing adapted` to be fitted over .the frontal portion of the patients abdominal region, means for releasably securing said casing about the body of the patient in Ysaid position, said'casing having provision to permit for the passage of fluid into and out of the casing for rhythmically expanding and Contracting theV latter, when the casing is secured about the bodyof the patient in said position, said casing having a pocket defined therein, and a fluid-tight bladder positioned in said pocket and having an opening for the passage of Vfluid into and out of the bladder for effecting said rhythmical expansion and Vcontraction of the Casing, and a conduit having one end thereof in fixed securenient to said bladder at said'pening thereof and having provision at its other end for releasable connection toa respirator pump, and means provided in said conduit to prevent the valving of said bladder when the latter is exhausted or deflated.

8. An abdominal belt respirator comprising a first panel adapted to fit over`the frontal portion of the patients abdominal region and a` second panel adapted to t over the patients back, said first panel comprising a flexible casing adapted to be rhythmically Vinflated and deflated for inducing'artificial respiration, and means for releasably 'securing said panels to each other whereby to `releasably secure said abdominal belt in body encircling relation, said releasable securing means comprising a first plurality of'st'raps extending from one side edge o f said second panel, Va second plurality of straps extending from thejother Aside edge of said second panelfsaid first plurality of straps having adjustable buckles, said vfirst panel having hook element means engageable with said buckles and fixed buckle means engageable with said second plurality of straps.

9. An abdominal belt respirator comprising a first :panel adapted to fit over the frontal portion of the .patients abdominal region and a second panel adapted to fit over the patients back, said first panel comprising a flexible casing adapted to be rhythmically inflated and .deflated for inducing artificial respiration, and means for releasably securing said panels to each other whereby to releasably secure said abdominal belt in body encircling relation,` said releasable securing means comprisfing a first plurality of straps extending from one side edge of said second panel', a second plurality of straps extending from the other side edge of said second panel, .said first plurality of straps having adjustable buckles, said rst panel having hook element means engageable with said buckles and fixed buckle means engageable with said second plurality of straps, said hook element means comprising a Vpair of laterally'spaced hooks `for" selective engagement byeach of said adjustable buckles.

lOIAn abdominal belt respirator comprising a first panel adapted to fit over the frontal portionlof the patients yabdominal region and a second .panel adapted to fit over the patients back, saidk first panel comprising a flexibleY casing adapted to be rhythmicallyinilated and deflated for inducing artificial respiration, and means for releasably securing said panels to each other whereby to releasably secure said abdominal belt in body encircling relation, said releasable Vsecuring means comprising a first plurality of straps extendingfrom one side edge of said second panel, a second plurality'of straps extending from the other side edge ofl said second panel, said first plurality of straps having adjustable/buckles, s'aidfirst panel having ,hook Velement means engageable with'said buckles and` fixed buckle imeans engageable 'Withzsaid second 'plurality vof straps, said hook element means comprising a pair of laterally space dhooks for'selective engagement by each of said adjustable buckles, and said fixed lbuckle means comprising a pair of laterally spaced buckles for selective engagement by each of said second plurality of straps.

-lL-An abdominal vbelt respirator comprising ,a first panel Vadapted -to fit over the frontal portion of the patients abdominal region and a second panel adapted to fit over the patients back, said first panel comprising a flexible casing adapted to bey rhythmically inflated and deflated for inducing artificialrespiration, and means for releasably securing said 'panels' to eachother whereby to releasably secure said abdominal belt in body encirling relation, said Vreleasable securing means comprising `a first plurality of kstrapsrextending from one side edge of said second panel, a second plurality of straps extending `from the other side edge Lof said second panel, said first plurality of straps having adjustable buckles, Vsaid first 4panel having hook-elementsmeans engageable with said vbuckles and fixed buckle means engageable with said second plurality of straps, said hook element means comprising ,a pair of laterally spaced hooks for selective engagement by each of said adjustable buckles, and said Lfixed buckle means comprising a pair of laterally spaced buckles for selective engagement by -eachiof said second plurality'of straps, each pair of laterally spaced hooks being in lateral alignment with a pair `of klaterally `spaced-buckles.

References Cited in the file of this patent :UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,699,163 Engstrom Jan. 1, 19,55 2,762,366 Huxley et al. Sept. 1l, 1956 2,833,275 Turinrclifre May 6, 1958 www." im

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2699163 *Jun 25, 1951Jan 11, 1955Carl-Gunnar D EngstromRespirator
US2762366 *Dec 29, 1954Sep 11, 1956Conitech LtdArtificial respiration apparatus
US2833275 *Feb 28, 1956May 6, 1958Tunnicliffe Edward Alber JamesMechanical breathing apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3043292 *Jun 26, 1959Jul 10, 1962Emanuel S MendelsonInflatable, double-walled resuscitation garment
US4413620 *Sep 21, 1981Nov 8, 1983The Kendall CompanyAbdominal restraint system
US4971042 *Oct 23, 1989Nov 20, 1990Lerman Samuel ICardiac assist curiass
US5222478 *Jun 8, 1992Jun 29, 1993Scarberry Eugene NApparatus for application of pressure to a human body
US5343878 *Jun 1, 1993Sep 6, 1994Respironics Inc.Pressure application method
US5592938 *Aug 9, 1994Jan 14, 1997Respironics Inc.Mask apparatus
US5738637 *Dec 15, 1995Apr 14, 1998Deca-Medics, Inc.Chest compression apparatus for cardiac arrest
US6066106 *May 29, 1998May 23, 2000Emergency Medical Systems, Inc.Modular CPR assist device
US6090056 *Aug 27, 1997Jul 18, 2000Emergency Medical Systems, Inc.Resuscitation and alert system
US6142962 *Aug 27, 1997Nov 7, 2000Emergency Medical Systems, Inc.Resuscitation device having a motor driven belt to constrict/compress the chest
US6213960Jun 19, 1998Apr 10, 2001Revivant CorporationChest compression device with electro-stimulation
US6234984Apr 13, 1998May 22, 2001Deca-Medics, Inc.Chest compression apparatus for cardiac arrest
US6325771Apr 11, 2000Dec 4, 2001Deca-Medics, Inc.Chest compression apparatus for cardiac arrest
US6398745Jun 30, 1999Jun 4, 2002Revivant CorporationModular CPR assist device
US6447465Nov 10, 1998Sep 10, 2002Revivant CorporationCPR device with counterpulsion mechanism
US6547749Jul 12, 2001Apr 15, 2003Electromed, Inc.Body pulsating method and apparatus
US6599258Jul 14, 2000Jul 29, 2003Revivant CorporationResuscitation device
US6605050Jun 7, 2001Aug 12, 2003Electromed, Inc.Body pulsating jacket
US6616620May 25, 2001Sep 9, 2003Revivant CorporationCPR assist device with pressure bladder feedback
US6645163Mar 27, 2001Nov 11, 2003Deca-Medics, Inc.Chest compression apparatus for cardiac arrest
US6676614Jul 10, 2001Jan 13, 2004Electromed, Inc.Vest for body pulsating method and apparatus
US6709410Jun 3, 2002Mar 23, 2004Revivant CorporationModular CPR assist device
US6764455Oct 8, 2002Jul 20, 2004Advanced Respiratory, Inc.Chest compression vest with connecting belt
US6770041 *Apr 29, 2002Aug 3, 2004P.P.T.T. L.L.PExternal counterpulsation cardiac assist device pressure applicators having an outer shell which resists deformation
US6869408Sep 10, 2002Mar 22, 2005Revivant CorporationCPR device with counterpulsion mechanism
US6869409 *Apr 20, 1998Mar 22, 2005Revivant CorporationBelt with detachable bladder for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and circulatory assist
US6916298 *Oct 31, 2001Jul 12, 2005Advanced Respiratory, Inc.Pneumatic chest compression vest with front panel air bladder
US6926682Jul 29, 2003Aug 9, 2005Revivant CorporationResuscitation device
US6939314Jul 10, 2002Sep 6, 2005Revivant CorporationCPR compression device and method
US6939315Apr 30, 2003Sep 6, 2005Revivant CorporationCPR chest compression device
US7008388Jun 17, 2003Mar 7, 2006Revivant CorporationCPR chest compression device
US7011637Aug 25, 2003Mar 14, 2006Revivant CorporationChest compression device with electro-stimulation
US7056296Jun 17, 2003Jun 6, 2006Zoll Circulation, Inc.CPR device with pressure bladder feedback
US7077814May 18, 2004Jul 18, 2006Zoll Circulation, Inc.Resuscitation method using a sensed biological parameter
US7104967Mar 18, 2005Sep 12, 2006Zoll Circulation, Inc.Belt with detachable bladder for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and circulatory assist
US7131953Dec 31, 2003Nov 7, 2006Zoll Circulation, Inc.CPR assist device adapted for anterior/posterior compressions
US7166082Mar 18, 2005Jan 23, 2007Zoll Circulation, Inc.CPR device with counterpulsion mechanism
US7186225Nov 11, 2003Mar 6, 2007Deca-Medics, Inc.Chest compression apparatus for cardiac arrest
US7278978Aug 22, 2003Oct 9, 2007Electromed, Inc.Respiratory vest with inflatable bladder
US7316658Sep 8, 2003Jan 8, 2008Hill-Rom Services, Inc.Single patient use vest
US7374548Mar 22, 2004May 20, 2008Zoll Circulation, Inc.Modular CPR assist device to hold at a threshold of tightness
US7442173Nov 28, 2000Oct 28, 2008Zoll Circulation, Inc.Resuscitation device with friction liner
US7497837Mar 13, 2006Mar 3, 2009Zoll Circulation, Inc.Chest compression device with electro-stimulation
US7517326Jul 18, 2006Apr 14, 2009Zoll Circulation, Inc.Resuscitation device including a belt cartridge
US7666153Sep 6, 2005Feb 23, 2010Zoll Circulation, Inc.CPR compression device and method including a fluid filled bladder
US7996081Aug 8, 2005Aug 9, 2011Zoll Circulation, Inc.Resuscitation device with expert system
US8062239 *May 19, 2008Nov 22, 2011Zoll Circulation, Inc.Method of performing CPR with a modular CPR assist device using a brake to momentarily hold a belt at a threshold of tightness
US8092404Aug 4, 2003Jan 10, 2012Deca-Medics, Inc.Chest compression apparatus for cardiac arrest
US8202237Apr 21, 2009Jun 19, 2012Electromed, Inc.Portable air pulsator and thoracic therapy garment
US8224442 *Jul 28, 2011Jul 17, 2012Zoll Circulation, Inc.Resuscitation device with expert system
US8298165Nov 7, 2006Oct 30, 2012Zoll Circulation, Inc.CPR assist device adapted for anterior/posterior compressions
US8460223Mar 13, 2007Jun 11, 2013Hill-Rom Services Pte. Ltd.High frequency chest wall oscillation system
US20110282408 *Jul 28, 2011Nov 17, 2011Zoll Circulation, Inc.Resuscitation Device with Expert System
USRE40814Jan 14, 2002Jun 30, 2009Hill-Rom Services, Inc.Oscillatory chest compression device
EP1714630A1Nov 26, 1996Oct 25, 2006Deca-Medics, Inc.Chest compression apparatus for cardiac arrest
WO2001015652A2 *Jul 13, 2000Mar 8, 2001American Biosystems IncChest compression vest with connecting belt
Classifications
U.S. Classification601/44
International ClassificationA61H31/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61H31/00, A61H2201/165, A61H2201/1238, A61H2201/0103
European ClassificationA61H31/00