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Publication numberUS2901044 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 25, 1959
Filing dateJul 7, 1955
Priority dateJul 7, 1955
Publication numberUS 2901044 A, US 2901044A, US-A-2901044, US2901044 A, US2901044A
InventorsArnold Edward W
Original AssigneeArnold Edward W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pulling tool
US 2901044 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

s- 5, 1959 E. w. ARNOLD 2,901,044

PULLING TOOL Filed July '7, 1955 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 l0 10 ll fo l/varo W. Arno/0 INVENTOR.

' A rra/wvls r Aug. 25, 1959 E. w. ARNOLD PULLING' TOOL Filed July 7, 1955 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. EG/Law. W

4 da ill!!! 1959 E. w. ARNOLD 2,901,044

PULLING TOOL Filed July 1955 v 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Ea wcr/c/ W. Arno/d IN VEN TOR.

BY I 1/,

atent 2,901,044 Patented Aug. 25, 1959 PULLING TOOL Edward W. Arnold, Houston, Tex.

Application July 7, 1955, Serial No. 520,464

Claims. (Cl. 166-98) The present invention relates to a well tool and more particularly to a pulling tool for use in removing stuck objects from a well bore.

Various hydraulic pulling tools have been proposed in the past for aiding in recovering the fish from the well bore which is the term applied to stuck pipe. However, such tools are difiicult to manipulate because once the fish or stuck object has been engaged, it is then difiicult to disengage therefrom, should such become desirable. Another disadvantage with hydraulic pulling tools of prior use is that it is difiicult to reset the tool in the well while remaining engaged with the fish so that the fish may be stepwise lifted or jacked out of its stuck position in the well bore.

One of the objects of the present invention is to provide a pulling tool for removing stuck objects from a well bore which is adapted to be hydraulically actuated and which may be reset in the well bore while remaining engaged with the stuck object so that a plurality of separate pulling efforts may he applied to the stuck object.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a pulling tool for engaging and removing stuck objects from a well bore which tool includes slip means for positioning the tool in the well bore and piston means which are adapted to be moved longitudinally of the positioned body so that a pulling force may be exerted on the stuck pipe, said slip means and piston means being actuated by hydraulic pressure which may be relieved if it becomes desirable to disengage from the fish or in order to reset the tool in the well bore for additional pulling efforts.

Yet a further object of the invention is to provide a hydraulically actuated pulling tool which includes slip means that are also hydraulically actuated so that the same fluid pressure which actuates the tool may be used to position the tool in the well bore.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a hydraulic pulling tool through which circulation or washing may be effected as the tool is lowered into the well bore and as it is positioned in the well bore, which circulation may thereafter be terminated and the tool actuated to exert a pulling effort on the stuck object in the well bore.

Yet a further object of the invention is to provide a hydraulic pulling tool through which circulation may be effected as it is being lowered into the well bore and positioned therein, and valve means in the pulling tool whereby circulation may thereafter be efiected above the tool or to the tool for actuation thereof.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a hydraulic pulling tool wherein hydraulic pressure is used to exert a pulling effort on a stuck object in a well bore in order to remove it, which tool may be reset in the Well bore with a minimum of effort.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a hydraulic pulling tool wherein hydraulic pressure is used to pull a stuck object from a Well, which tool is provided with fluid conducting means for aiding in disengaging the tool for subsequent removal of the tool from the well.

A further object of the invention is to provide a hydraulic pulling tool wherein hydraulic pressure may be exerted to pull a stuck object from a well bore, said tool having passage means whereby hydraulic fluid may be used to actuate the tool and for aiding in releasing the tool for removal from the well, or for re-setting the tool, whichever may be desired.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a hydraulic pulling tool which has valve means for controlling the flow of fluid to the tool for operation of the tool as desired.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become more readily apparent from a consideration of the following description and drawings wherein:

Fig. 1 is a schematic line drawing illustrating the tool lowered into the well bore and in inactive position;

Fig. 2 is a schematic drawing similar to Fig. 1, showing the tool parts represented in their relative positions after the tool has been positioned in the well bore, engaged with the stuck pipe and the tool then actuated;

Fig. 3A is a vertical sectional view of the upper portion of the tool showing the valve means and part of the slips;

Fig. 3B is a continuation of the tool illustrated in Fig. 3A showing additional slips and the upper end of the piston rod in the intermediate section of the tool body;

Fig. 3C is a quarter sectional view which is a continuation of the tool shown in Figs. 3A and 3B and shows the piston means on the piston rod in more detail;

Fig. 3D is a one-quarter sectional view showing the lower portion of the tool with the lower end of the piston rod connected to a means for engaging the stuck pipe so that the movement of the pistons and piston rod may be transmitted thereto;

Fig. 4 is a sectional view on the line 4-4 of Fig. 3A showing in more detail the slip construction of the present tool with the slips in expanded position;

Fig. 5 is a sectional view on the line 5-5 of Fig. 3D and illustrates the connection between the lower end of the tool body and the piston rod which connection accommodates sliding movement between the rod and the tool body;

Fig. 6 is a sectional view, partly in elevation, showing the valve means used in operating the tool moved to a different position in the tool body;

Fig. 7 is a sectional view on the line 7-7 of Fig. 6, illustrating the slips in retracted position; and

Fig. 8 is a vertical sectional view showing the valve means moved to still another position.

In Fig. 3A the well tool is generally denoted by the numeral 2 and is shown as having its body 5 formed of a plurality of sections, which sections are connected together by collars or coupling means 5 suitably constructed and arranged as illustrated in the drawings for accomplishing their intended function. The tool body 5 may be of any suitable length, depending upon the number of operating pistons to be used in the tool. This, of course, can be varied without departing from the scope of the invention.

The tool is adapted to be lowered into the well bore on the operating string 6, such operating string being connected to the upper end 8 of the tool by suitable cooperating threaded means as illustrated at 8. In Fig. 1 the invention is schematically illustrated as lowered into the well pipe 3 to a suitable elevation so that it may be engaged with the stuck object or fish 4. During lowering of the tool in the well, it is generally desirable to maintain circulation through the Well string 6 and the tool 2. Such fluid is conducted down through passage 7 in the operating pipe 6, the passage 11 in the valve means 9, and the passage 11 extending through the well tool body 5 and the piston rod 46. I

When the tool has been lowered to its desired position in the well bore, a ball 47 may be dropped into the well string 6 so as to seat on the annular shoulder 48 at the end of the fluid passage ll' in the tool, which shoulder is in'the lower end of the piston rod.46. This shuts off [fluid communication through the tool and the tool may now be actuated to position it in the well pipe 3.

Of course, prior to lowering the ball 47 to close olf communication, the spear, schematically illustrated at 54 in Figs. 1 and 2, will have been engaged with the fish 4. In some situations, it is necessary to manipulate the tool in the well bore over an extensive period of time in order to engage the fish or stuck object 4 with the spear 54. Under such conditions it is usually desirable to maintaincirculation withinthe well bore or well ,pipe during such period of attempting to engage the fish. However, once the fish has been engaged, the ball 47 may be dropped and if it is then desired to maintain circulation in the well bore prior to actuation of thetool, the valve means 9 may be moved by manipulating or rotating the well string 6 so as tocOmmunicate passage 11 and the well bore above the tool through the port 23 in the valve means 9 and communicating port 23' in the upper end of the tool body 5. In order to accomplish circulation through ports 23 and 23', the ball 21 is dropped into the operating pipe 6 so that it will come to rest on the seat 20 as shown in Figs. 3A and 8. Fluid pumped down passage 7 in pipe 6 will then be discharged out ports 23 and 23'.

When it is desired to actuate the tool, the valve means 9 may be manipulated by rotation of the string 6 to communicate port 23 and passage 24 in the tool body 5, whereupon fluid pressure may be conducted to the chambers 44 to expand the slips or slip segments 30 to engage the periphery 33 of the well pipe, as shown in Figs. 2 and 3A. The fluid pressure may then be conducted through passage 11' and discharged through ports 57 in piston rod 46 so as to move the pistons 50 longitudinally and upwardly relative to the tool body 5 which body is maintained in a fixed position in the pipe 3 by the slips 36. Application of fluid pressure to the pistons will move them from the position of Fig. l to the position illustrated in Fig. 2 of the drawings. Since the spear 54 is engaged to the lower end of piston rod 46, movement of such rod causes movement of the spear 54 and engaged fish 4 upwardly within the well bore.

The valve means 9 may then be positioned as shown in Fig. 6 of the drawings so as to release the slips 30 by permitting the fluid from chamber 44 to flow outwardly into the well bore through passage 24 and port 24. The well tool may be then positioned in the well pipe 3 so that the pistons will assume their relative position in the tool body 5 as shown in Fig. l of the drawings. The valve 9 may then be moved to the position shown in Fig. 3A of the drawings to supply fluid so as to again expand the slips 30 and again actuate the pistons 50 so that the stuck object 4 may be jacked or stepwise pulled from the well bore.

The valve means generally denoted by the numeral 9, controls the flow of fluid to the tool for actuation thereof, for release thereof, as well as controlling flow of fluid through the tool or above the tool to maintain circulation in the well bore as desired.

As shown in Fig. 3A, the valve means 9 includes the elongated body 10 which is provided with a flow passage 11 extending longitudinally thereof and which communicates at its upper end with the flow passage 7 in the well string 6. The body 10 is provided with a threaded area 12 thereon for engagement with the threaded area 13 in the upper part of the tool body 5 whereby the valve may be moved to various positions longitudinally of the body 5 of the tool for conducting fluid to the tool or to the well bore above the tool as will be described more fully hereinafter. The body 10 extends downwardly below the threaded area 12 as illustrated at 14 and slid- .4 ably fits within the passage 15 in the upper part of the well tool body 5. Mounted on the periphery 16 of the portion 14 are spaced annular seal means 17, 17' and 17", which may be of any suitable type such as O-ring seals. Such seals slidably, but sealably, engage with the inner periphery or wall 18 of the passage 15 so that selected parts in the well tool body may be communicated for actuation of the tool, or for release of the tool, or for circulation of mud fluid either through the tool or above the tool as desired and to be described in more detail hereinafter.

The lower portion 14 of the valve body 10 is provided with a portion 19 of reduced diameter to further aid in placing certain ports in the tool body and the valve in communication as desired. The reduced portion 19 terminates at a point spaced from the lower O-ring seal 17" so that the portion between the seals 17' and 17" Within the passage 15 may be sealed off as desired.

It is to be noted that the passage .11 extends completely through the body 10 of the valve means 9, such passage being provided with a seat 20 for receiving a ball 21 to close off communication through the outlet 22 at the end of passage 11. A lateral opening 23 between the spaced seals 17 and 17' is provided for discharge of the fluid from the passage 11 after the ball 21 illustrated in dotted line in Figs. 3A and 6 has been dropped in position. The lateral port 23 in valve 9 may be communicated with the passage 24 in well tool body 5 whereby the fluid from passage 11 may be by-passed around the opening 22 and subsequently discharged into the opening 11' which opening extends through the remainder of the tool 2.

The valve means 9 may be actuated by rotating the operating string 6 after the fish" has been engaged, or after the slips 30 have set the tool 2 in well pipe 3. A stop pin in the upper part of the tool body 5 limits the relative movement between the valve and the remainder of the tool body and keeps them from becoming separated during operation of the tool.

In order to position the well tool within the well pipe so that a pulling force may be exerted thereby on a stuck object, suitable means such as slips or slip segments 30 are provided. Such slips are mounted within the recesses 31 of the well tool body 5 and are provided with tooth faces 32 for engaging the inner periphery 33 of well pipe 3 when such slips are expanded. A rubber sleeve 34 is mounted within the recess 31 and abuts the rear surface 35 of the slips as more clearly illustrated in Figs. 4 and 7 of the drawings. Such sleeve in cooperation with the walls of recess 31 forms a chamber 44 behind the slips for receiving fluid pressure from the passage 11 and ports 36 which communicate therewith whereby such fluid pressure may act on sleeve 34 and expand it so as to move the slips 30 outwardly into engagement with the well pipe wall 33 as shown in Fig. 3A of the drawings.

In order to maintain the sleeve 34 and the slip segments 30 in proper relative position during expansion and retraction of the slips, a longitudinally extending recess 38 is provided in the rear surface 35 of each of the slips 30 in which recess there is a conforming portion 39 of the rubber sleeve 34. To prevent flowing of the rubber sleeve 34 between the slip segments or slips 30 when they are in the expanded position as illustrated in Fig. 4, spaced metal reinforcing plates 40 may be provided in the outer periphery 41 of the sleeve 34. Such plates extend longitudinally of the sleeve 34 from the top 42 to the bottom 43 of the recess 31 and are shaped so as not to inhibit free radial movement of the slip segments 30 outwardly when fluid pressure is applied to the chamber 44 behind the slips 30 and so as not to interfere with free sliding movement of the segments 30 as they retract. As may be clearly noted in Fig. 4, the width of the strips is suificient so as to overlap between adjacent expanded slip segments 30 to prevent flowing of rubber into the space 43 between expanded slip segments.

As previously mentioned, the sleeve 34 in cooperation with the walls of the recess 31 forms a chamber 44 in the tool body which is adapted to receive fluid pressure for actuation of the slips. The sleeve 34 also acts as a seal to aid in retaining the hydraulic pressure fluid within the chamber 44 when the slips have been actuated so as to aid in maintaining them expanded to insure positioning of the tool during operation thereof. However, the resiliency of such sleeve functions to aid in returning the slips 30 to their normally retracted position as illustrated in Fig. 7 when the fluid pressure is released from chamber 44 whereby the tool may be disengaged from well pipe 3 so that it can be either reset in the pipe for exerting another pulling effort, or may be released from engagement with the fish 4 for removal of the tool from the well bore.

There may be a plurality of sets of slip segments 30 so as to insure positive positioning of the tool within the well pipe. Three of such sets are illustrated in Figs. 3A and 3B; however, it should be appreciated that any suitable number may be arranged longitudinally on the well tool body 5 without departing from the scope of the present invention.

The intermediate portion 49 of the tool is provided with a plurality of pistons 50 which are mounted on piston. rod 46, which rod extends longitudinally of the tool 2. A plurality of seals 51 are arranged at suitable intervals in the body 5 of the well tool so as to engage the outer periphery 52 of the piston rod 46. This inhibits leakage of fluid downwardly along the outside of the piston rod. The passage 11' extends downwardly through the piston rod 46 as shown in Figs. 3B, 3C and 3D of the drawings and is provided with the annular shoulder or seat 48 at the lower end thereof. The opening 53 communicates the passage 11 with the spear means 54 of the lower end of the piston rod 46. The spear 54 in turn communicates through port means (not shown) to the well bore so that when the tool is being lowered into the well bore, the mud fluid may be circulated downwardly through the passage 7 in well string 6, through ports 11 and 11 in the well tool 2 and outwardly into the well pipe 3 through the port means in the spear where it may be recirculated upwardly to the top of the well.

The piston rod 46 and the pistons 50 thereon are movable longitudinally relative to the tool body 5, the pistons moving within their respective chambers 56 formed between the collars or couplings 5' within the tool body 5, such movement occurring in response to the application of fluid pressure from passage 11' through ports 57 which are arranged in'the piston rod 46 below each of the pistons 50, and communicating with the chambers 56. The pistons 50 may be of any suitable well known construction and are provided with an annular seal member 58 whereby application of fluid pressure through the passage 11', .port 57 and into chamber 56 will eifect an upward movement of the pistons longitudinally relative to the' tool body 5.

The fishing spear 54 may be of any suitable well known construction and it is believed unnecessary to give a detailed description thereof, since such devices are well known in the art.

It is to be noted, however, that the lower end 60 of the piston rod 46 is provided with a plurality of flutes 61 which extend longitudinally on the outer surface 62 of the piston rod. The portion 63 of the tool body 5 adjacent the flutes 61 is provided with a plurality of grooves 64 which are adapted to slidably receive the flutes 61. This construction is more clearly illustrated in Figs. 3D and 5 of the drawings. Such construction permits a sliding, but non-rotating arrangement between the piston rod 46 and the tool body 5 as well as between the tool fishing spear 54 which is connected on the lower end of the piston rod. Normally, such fishing spears are provided with some arrangement such as slips 65 for engaging the, stuck object 4, which slips are actuated by means of a J-slot construction, well known in the art. As previously mentioned, the construction and operation of fishing spears are well known in the art and it is believed unnecessary to give a detailed description and statement of operating function thereof. The splined or fluted arrangement shown in Figs. 3D and 5 permits the tool to be manipulated so that the fishing spear 54 can be engaged with the stuck object 4 and also permits the tool 2 to be manipulated to release the spear 54 from the stuck object should it become impossible, for one reason or another, to pull the stuck object from the well.

To further aid in describing the invention, and as additional description of the functioning of the device, it

will be assumed that the invention is connected to the well string 6 and is being lowered into the well pipe or casing 3 for engagement with the stuck object 4.

Under such circumstances, fluid is pumped downwardly through the passage 7 so that it is discharged through the passages 11 and 11 in the tool 2 and outwardly through the bottom thereof whereby circulation in the well casing 3 is maintained during lowering of the tool, as well as during the interval that the tool is being engaged with the fish. Of course, as the tool is lowered in the well pipe, the fishing spear 54 is in an inactivated position.

If a slip type engagement means 65 is used on the spear, then such slips will be in a retracted position in the spear so as to inhibit damage to the spear as it is lowered into the well bore. As the tool is lowered, the valve means 9 may, as previously mentioned, be positioned so that circulation through the tool may be eflected as desired.

When the fish 4 has been engaged by the spear 54, the ball 47 may be dropped into the Well string and it is of a size so that it will pass through the passage 11 and into the passage 11' so as to seat on the shoulder 48. This stops circulation through the tool 2.

Under some conditions, it will be desirable to circulate above the tool 2, and this may be accomplished by dropping ball 21 into the operating pipe so that it seats on shoulder 20. The operating pipe may then be rotated so as to communicate ports 23 and 23 as illustrated in Fig. 8 whereby circulation above the tool 2 may be effected.

When it is desired to set the tool 2 in the casing 3 so as to exert a pull on the spear 54 and stuck object 4, the operating string 6 is then rotated so that valve 9 will move to the position shown in Fig. 3A. Fluid pressure may now be conducted from pipe 6 through passage 11 to port 23 and communicated passage 24. From passage 24 the fluid flows through passage 11 to chamber 44 to cause the slip segments 30 to expand radially of the tool body 5 to engage the periphery 33 of the well casing 3. This is illustrated in Figs. 3A and 3B of the drawings and when the slips 39 have been thus actuated, the well tool 2 is now ready to exert a pulling efiort on the stuck object 4.

Application of additional fluid pressure through the passages 7, 11 and 11, with the valve in the same position as above described, causes fluid to be discharged through ports 57 into chambers 56 to act against the lower side 67 of the pistons. Since the well tool body has been positioned in the well bore by means of the slips or slip segments 30, the pulling effort is trans mitted through the piston rod 46 to the spear 54 on the lower end thereof and thence to the stuck object. Such pulling force tends to move the stuck object upwardly in the well.

Under some conditions, it may be necessary to apply a plurality of separate pulling eflorts to the fish 4 in order to release it from its stuck position in the well bore and after the pistons 50 have moved as far as they can travel in the chamber 56 of the well tool, it is then necessary to reset the pistons in the tool so that another pulling effort may be exerted on the fish 4. It is undesirable under most conditions to release or disengage the tool 2 from the fish 4 and then try to re-engage the fish after the tool parts have been moved back to a position where they may cooperate to exert an additional pulling efiort. The present invention overcomes such problem in that the tool parts may be moved back to their initial position illustrated in Fig. 1, while maintaining engagement with the fish 4 as shown in Fig. 2.

To accomplish this, the operating string 6 is rotated so as to move the valve means 9 upwardly relative to the tool body to the position shown in Fig. 6 of the drawings. The valve 9 is thereby positioned so that the seals 1'7 and 17" span passage 24 and port 24 as shown in Fig. 6 of the drawings. When this occurs, the fluid in chamber 44 normally urging the slips 30 into engagement with the well pipe 3, as well as the fluid in the chambers 56 urging the pistons 59 to an elevated position may flow through the ports 35 and 57 respectively back into passage 11' and upwardly therethrough to passage 24, around the recessed area 19 on the lower end of valve means 9 and out through port 24. The fluid within the well bore will exert a pressure on the exposed surface area of the slips 39 and will aid in collapsing them to their retracted position shown in Fig. 7. The ball 21 and seal 17' cooperate to keep the pressure in the fluid column in operating pipe 6 from acting on the slips, thereby aiding in collapsing the slips 3%) from their expanded position.

When the slips have been released from engagement with the well pipe 3, the well tool body 5 may be raised relative to the pistons 50 until the initial relative position of Fig. l is attained. At such time, the valve means 9 may be moved downwardly by rotating the operating pipe 5 in an opposite direction so as to communicate the Well fluid in the operating pipe 6 through port 23 in valve 9 to passage 2 in body 5 and thence to the slips 39. After the slips 30 have been reactuated to again engage the pipe an additional pulling eflort may then be exerted by the well tool. The previously described operation may be continued until the fish 4' has been disengaged from its stuck position in the well bore.

A port 71 is provided in the well tool body 5 which communicates with chamber $6 above the pistons 50. This port acts as a bleed port to permit ingress of fluid to the chamber 56 as the piston 55% travels to its initial or pulling position as illustrated in Fig. 1.

If, for some reason it is impossible to remove the fish by pulling on it, then the present invention may be disengaged from the fish 4 by rotating the operating string 6 so that valve 9 assumes the position shown in Fig. 6 whereby the slips 3t) may be released as previously described. The fishing spear 54 may be released from the fish 4 and the tool 2 then removed from the well.

It is generally desirable to pull the tool from the well bore with the operating pipe or tubing string 6 dry. The present invention allows this to be done since the valve 9 can be moved so as to communicate the passagm 7 and 11 exteriorly of the tool 2 as it is pulled from the well bore.

The position of the valve 9 for such operations is illustrated in 8 and is the same position of the valve used for circulating mud fluid above the tool 2. It is to be noted that the valve 9 has been moved relative to the well tool body 5 so as to communicate port 23 in valve 9 with port 233 in the tool body 5. Therefore, as the operating string is raised in the well here, fluid therein may flow through passage Iii in valve 9 and out through ports 23, 23" and into the weil bore. This permits the tubing string to be pulled dry as the tool is removed from the well.

Broadly the invention relates to a pulling tool and more particularly to a pulling tool which may be set a plurality of times without releasing from engagement with the stuck object it is removing from the well bore.

What is claimed'is:

1. A pulling tool for engaging and pulling stuck objects from a well comprising a body, there being a fluid conducting passage extending longitudinally of said body, means mounted on said body for movement laterally of said body in response to fluid pressure from said passage to position said body in the well bore, means movably mounted on said body for movement longitudinally of said body in response to fluid pressure from said passage to exert an upward pull relative to said tool body, and valve means in said body closing off flow through said body passage, but operable upon relative rotation between said valve and body to open said body passage for fluid flow to actuate said body positioning means and said pulling means.

2. A pulling tool for engaging and pulling stuck objects from awell bore comprising, a body including a fluid conducting passage therein, slip means mounted in said body operable by fluid pressure from said fluid conducting passage in said body for positioning the tool in the well bore, piston means movably mounted in said body and adapted to move longitudinally thereof upon the application of fluid pressure from said fluid conducting passage in said body to one side of said piston means, means connected to said piston means for movement therewith, said last named means being adapted for engagement with the stuck object which is to be removed from the well bore, and valve means in said body for shutting off the fluid pressure in said fluid conducting passage of said body from said slip means and piston means to inhibit actuation thereof.

3. A well tool for pulling stuck pipe from a well bore comprising a body adapted to be lowered into the Well bore, fluid conducting passage means within said body, slip means mounted in said body for movement radially of said body whereby said slip means may move outwardly relative to said body for engaging and positioning said body in the well bore adjacent the stuck pipe to be removed, means below the lower end of said body for engaging the stuck pipe, piston means movably mounted on said body connected with said stuck pipe engaging means for exerting a pulling force on the stuck pipe, said slip means and piston means being operable by the application of fluid pressure from said fluid conducting passage means so that said body may be positioned in the well bore and said piston means then actuated to move said piston means so as to pull on said stuck pipe, and valve means in said body operable when in one position to direct fluid pressure to said slip and piston means to actuate said tool, and operable when in another position to relieve the fluid pressure from said fluid passage means to permit said slip means to retract whereby the tool may be reset in the well for another pull.

4. In a pulling tool for engaging and pulling stuck pipe from a well comprising, a body, there being a fluid conducting passage extending longitudinally of said body, slip means mounted on said body for movement laterally of said body, piston means movably mounted on said body for movement longitudinally of said body, there being fluid receiving chambers in said body communicating with said fluid passage in said body and communicating with said slip means, fluid conducting passage means com municating said body passage with fluid receiving chambers in which said piston means are movable whereby fluid pressure may be discharged from said fluid passage into said chambers to actuate said slip means and piston means to move said slip means laterally of said body and to move said piston means longitudinally of said body, and valve means for shutting off fluid pressure from said fluid conducting passage in said body to inhibit actuation of said slip and piston means, said valve being operable upon relative rotation between said body and valve to communicate fluid pressure to actuate said slip means and piston means.

5. In a pulling tool for engaging and, pulling stuclg pipe from a well comprising, a body, there being a fluid conducting passage extending longitudinally of said body, slip means mounted on said body for movement laterally of said body, piston means movably carried by said body for movement longitudinally of said body, there being fluid receiving chambers communicating said fluid passage in said body with said slip means, fluid conducting passage means communicating said body passage with fluid receiving chambers in which said piston means are movable whereby fluid pressure may be discharged from said fluid passage into said chambers to actuate said slip means and piston means to move said slip means laterally of said body and to move said piston means longitudinally of said body, and valve means in said body to communicate said chambers to the exterior of said body while simultaneously closing off the fluid passage in said body above said chambers to relieve the fluid pressure from said chambers.

6. A pulling tool for engaging and pulling stuck pipe from a well comprising, a body, there being a fluid conducting passage extending longitudinally of said body, slip means mounted on said body for movement laterally of said body, piston means movably mounted on said body for movement longitudinally of said body, there being fluid receiving chambers communicating said fluid passage with said slip means, fluid conducting passage means communicating said body passage with fluid receiving chambers in which said piston means are movable whereby fluid pressure may be discharged from said fluid passage into said chambers to actuate said slip means and piston means to move said slip means laterally of said body and to move said piston means longitudinally of said body, and valve means connected with said body for controlling the fluid discharge into said passage and to said chambers, said valve being operable by relative rotation between it and said body to conduct fluid pressure through said passage to said chambers to actuate said slip and piston means and operable by relative rotation between it and said body to communicate said chambers to the exterior of said tool and to simultaneously close ofi said body passage above said chambers for unloading the fluid from said chambers.

7. In a pulling tool for pulling stuck objects from a well comprising, a tool body having a fluid conducting passage therein, slip means mounted in said body for movement laterally thereof and actuated by fluid pressure from said passage to position said tool body in the well, means movably supported by said body for engaging the stuck object, said last named means actuated by fluid pressure from said passage for movement longitudinally of said body whereby a pulling effort may be exerted on the stuck object, and valve means in said body for controlling the flow of fluid through said passage means to control the actuation of said slip means and said object engaging and pulling means, said valve means adapted to close oflf the passage means in said body from said slip means and said object engaging and pulling means to relieve the fluid pressure on said object engaging and pulling means.

8. A tool for pulling stuck objects from a well comprising, a body, valve means for connecting said body to a pipe whereby it may be lowered into the well bore, slip means mounted in said body and responsive to fluid pressure for movement outwardly relative to said body for positioning said body in the well adjacent the stuck object to be removed, fluid actuated means movable longitudinally in said body for exerting a pulling eifort on the stuck object, means connected to said fluid actuated means and depending from said tool body for engaging the stuck object to transmit the pulling eflort from said fluid actuated means to the stuck object, there being fluid passage means in said body for conducting fluid to actuate said slip means and fluid actuated means, said valve means on said body controlling the flow of fluid through said passage to said slip means and fluid actuated means, a threaded connection engaging said valve means with said body whereby said valve means may be moved to a position upon relative rotation between said valve and said body for conducting fluid to actuate said slip means and said fluid actuated means, and may be moved to another position upon relative rotation between said valve and said body for shutting ofl fluid from said fluid passage means to said slip means and said fluid actuated means.

9. A tool for pulling stuck objects from a well comprising, a body, valve means for connecting said body to a pipe whereby it may be lowered into the well bore, slip means mounted in said body and responsive to fluid pressure for movement outwardly relative to said body for positioning said body in the well adjacent the stuck object to be removed, fluid actuated means movable longitudinally in said body for exerting a pulling effort on the stuck object, means connected to said fluid actuated means and depending from said tool body for engaging the stuck object to transmit the pulling effort from said fluid actuated means to the stuck object, there being fluid passage means in said body for conducting fluid to actuate said slip means and fluid actuated means, said valve means on said body shutting off the flow of fluid through said passage, a threaded connection engaging said valve means with said body whereby said valve means may be moved to a position upon relative rotation between said valve and said body for conducting fluid to actuate said slip means and said fluid actuated means, and port means in said body communicating said fluid conducting passage with the exterior of said body, said body port means and fluid conducting passage being in non-communicated relation when said valve means is in position to conduct fluid to said slip means and said fluid actuated means, said valve means being movable to another position upon relative rotation between said body and said valve for communicating said body port means and said fluid conducting passage.

10. A pulling tool for engaging and pulling stuck objects from a well comprising, a body, there being a fluid conducting passage extending longitudinally of said body, means mounted in said body for movement laterally of said body in response to fluid pressure from said passage to position said body in the well bore, means mounted in said body for movement longitudinally of said body in response to fluid pressure from said passage to exert an upward pull relative to said tool body, there being in said body fluid receiving chambers communicating with said fluid passage and said laterally movable means and said longitudinally movable means whereby fluid pressure may be discharged into said chambers to actuate said means, and valve means in said body for closing off communication between said chambers and said fluid passage while simultaneously communicating said chambers to the exterior of said body to relieve the fluid pressure in said chambers.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,370,832 Baker Mar. 6, 1945 2,377,249 Lawrence May 29, 1945 2,474,453 Armitage June 23, 1949 2,537,413 Lawrence Jan. 9, 1951 2,674,199 Page Apr. 6, 1954 2,732,901 Davis Ian. 31, 1956 2,763,327 Ransom Sept. 18, 1956 2,806,534 Potts Sept. 17, 1957

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3026939 *Jul 30, 1959Mar 27, 1962Sweetman William GExplosive-actuated well tool anchor
US3105561 *Sep 13, 1960Oct 1, 1963Jersey Prod Res CoHydraulic actuated drill collar
US3203483 *Jun 25, 1964Aug 31, 1965Pan American Petroleum CorpApparatus for forming metallic casing liner
US3871447 *Jun 8, 1974Mar 18, 1975Baker Oil Tools IncTubing hanger setting tool
US4258792 *Mar 15, 1979Mar 31, 1981Otis Engineering CorporationHydraulic tubing tensioner
US4296806 *Oct 5, 1979Oct 27, 1981Otis Engineering CorporationHigh temperature well packer
US5070941 *Aug 30, 1990Dec 10, 1991Otis Engineering CorporationDownhole force generator
US5785120 *Nov 14, 1996Jul 28, 1998Weatherford/Lamb, Inc.Tubular patch
US5957195 *Oct 7, 1997Sep 28, 1999Weatherford/Lamb, Inc.Wellbore tool stroke indicator system and tubular patch
US6142230 *Oct 31, 1998Nov 7, 2000Weatherford/Lamb, Inc.Wellbore tubular patch system
US20120312549 *Nov 19, 2010Dec 13, 2012National Oilwell Varco L.P.Tubular retrieval
USRE31933 *Apr 4, 1983Jul 2, 1985Otis Engineering CorporationHigh temperature well packer
EP0080527A1 *Nov 30, 1981Jun 8, 1983The Dow Chemical CompanyDevice for shifting a port collar sleeve
EP0370744A1 *Nov 20, 1989May 30, 1990Plexus Ocean Systems LimitedA method of and apparatus for installing a casing under tension
EP0477452A2 *Dec 28, 1990Apr 1, 1992Halliburton CompanyDownhole force generator
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Classifications
U.S. Classification166/98, 166/330, 166/212
International ClassificationE21B23/00, E21B31/00, E21B31/20, E21B23/04
Cooperative ClassificationE21B31/20, E21B23/04
European ClassificationE21B31/20, E21B23/04