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Publication numberUS2901141 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 25, 1959
Filing dateJun 11, 1956
Priority dateJun 11, 1956
Publication numberUS 2901141 A, US 2901141A, US-A-2901141, US2901141 A, US2901141A
InventorsDedmon James F
Original AssigneeDedmon James F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wirebound snap-on crate
US 2901141 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 25, 1959 J. F. DEDMON WIREBOUND SNAP-ON CRATE 5 Sheets-Shet 1 Filed June 11, 1956 J. F. DEDMON WIREBOUND SNAP-0N CRATE Aug. 25, 1959 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 11, 1956 INVENTOR:

JAMES F. DEDMON ATT'YS Aug. 25, 1959 J. F. DEDMON 2,901,141

WIREBOUND SNAP-0N CRATE Filed June 11, 1956 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 4 w N n 1. 0 n t I 9 mm T n 1 1 n W M I a l S IJ: p 6

Aug. 25, 1959 J. DEDMON WIREBOUND SNAP-ON CRATE 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed June 11, 1956 INVENTOR: JAMES F. DEDMON BY M rM ATT'YS United States Patent WIREBOUND SNAP-N CRATE James F. Dedmon, Milan, Tenn.

Application June '11, 1956, Serial No. 590,652

Claims. (Cl. 217-48) This invention relates to a box or crate of the wirebound type.

The crate of the present invention may be either in the form of a tube, or it may be used in the form of a mat to be wrapped around the base or pallet of the crate. The crate body comprises a plurality of spaced apart panels which are hingedly connected together by encircling binding 'wires. Certain of the panels are adapted to be provided on their inner surfaces with inwardly projecting strips to engage the side edges of the deck of a pallet, whereby the projections may be snapped underneath the projecting edges of the deck, and thus lock the mat, preferably in its tubular form, in position to the pallet.

The primary object of the present invention is the provision of a new and improved crate having means formed on the inner sides of certain panels forming the enclosing walls of the crate for snap-on engagement with a pallet or other base.

Another object of the invention consists in new and improved means for applying a crate body to its base or bottom, without the use of tools, by merely snapping a pair of projections on opposed panels to the pallet or base.

Another object of the invention-resides in the provision of new and improved means for forming the slats of the crate panels by arranging the binding wires in certain grooves in certain faces of certain of the slats.

A further object of the invention consists in the provision of a new and improved pallet construction coopcrating with securernent means arranged on the inner surfaces of opposed crate panels for locking the crate body to the pallet and to permit easy removal of the crate body from the pallet.

A further object consists in a new and improved slat construction provided with certain horizontal slots arranged on certain faces to receive the binding wires.

A still further object of the invention consists in the provision of a new and improved pallet cooperating with new and improved means on opposed panels of a crate for attachment to, and detachment from, a pallet or other crate base or bottom.

Numerous other objects and advantages of the invention will beapparent throughout the specification which is to follo'w. i

The accompanying drawings illustrate a certain selected embodiment of the invention, and the views therein are as follows:

Fig. 1 is a detail perspective view of a crate embodying the invention;

Fig. 2 is a detail perspective exploded view showing the crate body and the pallet upon which the body is mounted;

Fig. 3 is a detail view of a four-paneled mat embodying the invention;

Fig. 4 is a detail longitudinal end view showing the mat of Fig. 3 in its folded position;

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Fig. 5 is a detail perspective view of one form of pallet which is arranged in its open or laid out position;

Fig. 6 is a detail perspective view of the pallet in its folded and locked position;

Fig. 7 is a detail sectional view on the line 7-7 of Fig. 6;

Fig. 8 is a view similar to Fig. 7, but showing the two sections of the pallet spaced apart, and the manner in which the sections are spaced at their outer or rear ends;

Fig. 9 is a detail rear or elevational view looking in the direction of the arrows 9-9 of Fig. 6;

Fig. 10 is a detail perspective view of one inner end of the pallet looking in the direction of the arrows 10-10 of Figs. 6 and 7;

Fig. 11 is a detail perspective view of the crate arranged in tube form and its cooperating pallet, and showing the manner in which the tube is applied to the pallet;

Fig. 12 is a detail plan view of the crate looking downward from the top and showing the manner in which the crate and cooperating pallet are assembled together;

Fig. 13 is a detail transverse sectional view on the lines 13-13 of Figs. 1 and 12;

Fig. 14 is a view similar to Fig. 13 with the crate body not yet engaged with its cooperating pallet, the view being taken on the line 14-14 of Fig. 12;

Fig. 15 is a detail elevational view looking toward the inside of a panel, and showing the manner in whichthe locking strips are arranged and mounted;

Fig. 16 is a detail transverse sectional view on the line 16-16 of Fig. 15; and

Fig. 17 is a detail transverse. sectional view on the line 17-17 of Fig. 15.

The particular construction herein shown for the purpose of illustrating the invention comprises a crate 1, Figs. 1 to 4, formed from a mat 2, Fig. 3, containing four panels 3 to 6, which are hingedly connected by spaced upper and lower binding wires 7 and 8. The four panels 3, 4, 5 and 6 are formed continuously by cratemaking machinery, the panels being spaced a predetermined distance apart.

Each of the panels 3 to 6, inclusive, Fig. 3, is shown as comprising spaced upper and lower outside cleats 9 and 10 to which vertical end or corner slats 11 and 12, are fastened. Intermediate bracing slats 13 also may be secured to the cleats 9 and 10. Intermediate outside cleats (not shown) may be applied exteriorly of the slats 11 to 13 on larger sized crates. The inside positioned slats 11, 12 and 13 have their outer surfaces facing the inside surfaces of the outer cleats 9 and 10 and in physical contact therewith.

The upper and lower binding wires 7 and 8 (and intermediate binding wires, when required, should an intermediate cleat be used) hingedly connect the four panels 3 to 6 together. The free ends of each of the binding wires extend a predetermined distance beyond the ends of the outer or end panels 3 and 6, and are adapted to be connected in any convenient manner, such as by twisting them together as indicated at 14, Figs. 1, 2, l1 and 13. All four panels, thus, are hingedly connected together to form a tube, Figs. 1 and 2.

The panel 3 is shown as being identical in shape, size and construction with its oppositely disposed panel 5, while the panel 4 is shown as being identical in size, shape and construction with its oppositely disposed panel 6. All four panels 3 to 6 may have their tops flush, but the panels 4 and 6 have their lower ends extending below the bottoms of the panels 3 and 5, Fig. 3.

It is desirable that the crate be folded absolutely flat so as to conserve space in shipping and storing. It is further desired that no undue tension or strain be placed on the binding wires during the normal folding of the connected panels 3 to 6 into a tubular crate formation.

Therefore, in order to make a crate which will lie absolutely flat when folded, the spacing of the panels should be such that the space 15, between panels 4 and 5, Fig. 3, is greater than the space between panels 3 and 4 and between panels and 6 to form a folding corner 16, Figs. 1, 2, 4, l1 and 12. Also, the space 17 between the panels 6 and 3, when the panels are connected together to form a tube, is greater than the space between the panels 3 and 4 and between 5 and 6 to form a folding corner 18. The spaces and 17 at the folding corners 16 and 18, respectively, are a distance apart equal to twice the thickness of a corner slat; that is, the spaces between adjacent panels 4 and 5, Figs. 3 and 4, and between panels 6 and 1, when the crate is expanded, Figs. 1 and 2, is equal to the combined thickness of the two adjacent corner slats at the folding corners 16 and 18, Figs. 1, 2, 4, 11 and 12. The remaining spaces at the other folding corners, between panels 3 and 4 and between panels 5 and 6, as indicated at 19 and 20, respectively, have the outer edges of the adjacent corner slats spaced apart a distance equal to the thickness of one slat. Therefore, in the arrangement of the panels 3 to 6, in the mat formation shown in Fig. 3, the adjacent edges of certain corner slats are spaced a distance equal to the combined thickness of the adjacent two slats, while the adjacent edges of the remaining panels are spaced apart a distance equal to a single thickness of a corner slat. The spaced fastening corner 18 of the crate is formed by connecting the free ends of the binding wires 7, 8 together. This corner 18 is of the same panel spacing as the thickness of an end slat 11 of panel 3, plus the thickness of the end slat 12 of panel 6, whereby the so-called open corner 18 will be of the same size as the folded corner 16.

In a four panel crate as herein shown, the mat 2 is folded along the folded corner or corner fold 16, Fig. 4, whereupon the corner slats contact each other as shown in Fig. 4. At the free ends of the mat 2, where the free ends of the binding wires 7 and 8 are to be attached together at 14 to form the completed crate, the slats 11 to 13 of superposed panels also will be in contacting relationship. Therefore, the length of the binding wires, extending from one panel to the other panel (panels 6 and 3 and panels 4 and 5), is twice the distance of the length of the binding wire between panels 3 and 4 and panels 5 and 6. The mat 2, Fig. 3, first is folded, as shown in Fig. 4, and then the free ends of the binding wires are attached together, as indicated at 14, whereby a crate in tube form is provided lying completely and absolutely flat. When the folded crate, Fig. 4, is expanded to the position shown in Figs. 1, 2, 11 and 12 the binding wires 7 and 8 will be sufliciently taut, but there will not be such strain or tension on the wires as to cause them to cut into the corner edges of the end slats 11 and 12. The arrangement is such, therefore, that the crate, when expanded, will be in the position shown in Figs. 1, 2, 11 and 12, but for shipping and storage purposes the crate will be in its flattened formation, as shown in Fig. 4. A crate of the above type is shown in applicants copending application, Serial No. 515,970, filed June 16, 1955, now Patent No. 2,799,- 420, issued July 16, 1957.

The crate 1 is adapted to fit over, and be secured to, a pallet 21 as disclosed in applicants copending application. The pallet 21, Figs. 5 to 10, is preferably made of two sections 22 and 23. The section 22 is shown as being the upper section and the section 23 is shown as being the lower section.

The upper section 22, Figs. 5 to 10, is shown as comprising three spaced apart cleats or runners 24 to which a top deck 25 is secured, the deck 25 being of any usable form, but is specifically shown as comprising a plurality of transverse slats 26, preferably arranged in abutting relationship.

The lower pallet section 23, Figs. 5 and 6, is shown as being located immediately below the upper section 22, and in contacting relation. The section 23 comprises three spaced apart runners 27 arranged immediately below the runners 24 of the top section 22. The upper surfaces 28 of the runners 27 engage the bottom surfaces 29 of the runners 24 of the upper section 22. The undersides of the runners 27 are fastened together by a plurality of spaced braces in the nature of cross slats 30 so as to stiffen the runners 27 and maintain them rigidly in position.

Each runner 24 of the upper section 22, Figs. 5 and 6, has a vertically elongated slot or groove 31 at its outer end which corresponds with a similar groove 32 at the outer end of each runner 27 of the lower section 23. The opposite ends of the runners 24 and 27 are provided with vertically elongated slots or grooves 33 and 34, respectively. The grooves 33 and 34 are in vertical cooperating alinement when the sections 22 and 23 are brought together. The slots 31 and 32, and the slots 33 and 34 comprise, in effect, a single groove for the pallet when the two sections 22 and 23 are arranged in unitary contacting relation, as shown in Figs. 6, 7 and 9. The cooperating pairs of slots 31 and 32, and 33 and 34 are adapted to receive encircling binding wires 35, there being shown a single encircling binding wire 35 to encircle each of the cooperating runners 24 and 27 of the sections 22 and 23.

Each binding wire 35 completely encircles both sections 22 and 23, being secured to the top of the deck 25 immediately above the runners 24. Each wire 35 passes through the elongated slots 33 and 34 of each of the upper and lower runners 24 and 27, Figs. 7 to 9. The wire 35 then passes over the outside of the bottom slats 30 on the bottom of the lower runners 27. Each wire is longer than the periphery of the entire pallet, Figs. 6 and 7, so that there will be a relatively long free end 36, Figs. 5 and 8, extending forwardly from the upper section 22, and a relatively long free end 37 extending forwardly from the lower section 23. The extending lengths 36 and 37 of each binding wire are sufficiently long so that they may be received in the front grooves 31 and 32 of the runners 24 and 27, respectively, and to permit interlocking of these free ends in any convenient manner, such as by twisting the ends together as indicated at 38, Figs. 6 and 7. Each binding wire 35 is secured to the upper deck 25 and to the bottom slats 30 by means of staples 39 which straddle the wire 35, pass through the slats 26 or 30 and into the respective runners 24 and 27 of the sections, Figs. 6, 7 and 9.

The sections 22 and 23, during formation of the mat which forms the complete pallet 21, are spaced as indicated at 40, Fig. 5, a distance apart, the space being equal to the combined thickness of the slats 26 and 30 and the depth or height of the runners 24 and 27. Therefore, the binding wires 35 at the outer ends of the runners 24 and 27 act as a hinge 41, Figs. 5, 7 and 8, to permit the two sections 22 and 23 to be hiugedly connected. The sections 22 and 23 are thus capable to be folded from the position shown in Fig. 5, through the position shown in Fig. 8, and then into closed contacting relation as shown in Figs. 6, 7 and 9. The free ends 36 and 37 of the wires 35 extend down into the front grooves 31 and 32 when the two sections 22 and 23 are brought together, the ends then being secured together, as indicated at 38, Figs. 6 and 7, to lock the two sections tightly together to form a unitary pallet 21.

The binding wires 35, fitting in their respective slots 31, 32 and 33, 34, guide one section with respect to its other cooperating section so that the bottom of the top runners 24 can rest on top of the lower runners 27.

The two sections 22 and 23 are guided to relative position by the wires 35 engaging the slots. The two sections 22 and 23 may be further guided to relative position by providing alining means so as to definitely and positively aliue one section with respect to the other.

This alining means, Fig. 5, may comprise one or more spaced dowels 42 on one or more of the runners of one section engaging. cooperating dowel receiving holes 43 formed in the runners of the other section. Instead of using the dowels 42 and the holes 43, the runners 24 and 27, or some of them, may be provided with alined arcuate grooves 44 and 45, respectively, Fig. 7, to receive an elongated key 46. The key 46 in. one arcuate groove may be secured in place, or it may be left loose to" fit into the grooves to guide. one section with respect to its cooperating section. The arcua-te grooves 44 and 45 may be formed by means of a conventional circular saw.

The pallet 21, shown in Figs. to 10, therefore, comprises a unitary pallet made up of two sections secured together by continuous binding wires 35 which not only hingedly connect the two sections together, but also lock them together, each section being guided by the binding wires 35 receivable in the end slots of the runners of each section. The pallets 21, while in their laid out position, or mat arrangement shown in Fig. 5, are adapted to interfit or interengage each other, and thereby save considerable space over conventional pallets. Or, the completed unitary pallets, secured and locked together as shown in Figs. 6, 7 and 8, may be stored in the conventional manner, if desired.

The runners 24, at their inner ends, where the adjacent ends of the runners 24 and 27 are hingedly connected together by the binding wires 35, Figs. 7 to 10, are beveled as indicated at 48, Fig. 10, there being a relatively straight or perpendicular part 49 between the upper end of each bevel 48 and the upper surface of the runner 24. The inner ends of the runners 24, Fig. 10, extend a predetermined distance beyond the side edge 50 of the inermost s-lat 26. The slot 33 of each runner 24, of the section 2, is considerably deepened as indicated at 51, so that each binding wire 35 will be in the slot 33 at the point 52, Fig. 1 0, when the sections 22 and 23 are brought to closed position, Figs. 6, 7, 9 and 10.

The lower runners 27, at the outer side edges of the pallet 21, Figs. 5, 6, 9 and 10, are considerably wider than the runners 24 to provide a projecting ledge 53, Figs. 2, 9, 1'0, 13 and 14. The inner runner 27, positioned centrally of the section 23, is preferably the same width as the central runner 24 of section 22. The inner end of each runner 27 is beveled at 54, Fig. 10, to cooperate with the beveled surface 48 of each runner 24. The slot 34 is considerably deepened at the outer end of each runner, as indicated at '55, Fig. 10, so that the inner end of the slot 34 will be relatively flush with the edge 56 of a bottom slat 30. The side edge 50 of a slat 26 is in substantial vertical 'alinement with the side edge 56 of the slat 30. The ends of the slots 33 and 34, therefore, are in substantial vertical alinement. The inner end of the runners 24 extends a predetermined distance inwardly beyond the side edge '50 of a slat 26, while the inner edge of the runners 27 extends a. predetermined distance beyond the edge 56 of a slat 30; The cooperating beveled surfaces 48 and 54 permit the hinged joint between. the two sections 22 and 23 to be somewhat shortened, and assist in bringing the two sections into better guiding position, as well as assisting in: maintaining the wires 35 in the respective slots 33" and 34 (51 and 55). The deepened slots 51 and 55, and the beveled surfaces 48 and '54 cooperate to permit easier folding of the two sections, and guide the two sections more accurately during folding movement.

The deck 25, Figs. 5 to 10, terminates a short distance inwardly of the end of the runners 24 and the runners project beyond the side edge 50 of an inner sla-t 26. The outer edge 57 of the deck 25, Fig. 5,. also terminates short of the outer ends 58' of the runners 24, leaving outwardly projecting ends 59, Fig. 5 The projecting ends 59 aline with the outer projecting ends 60' of the runners 27, and when the two sections are connected together, the ends of the runners 24 and 27 will be relatively flush, Fig. 6. The cooperating slots 31 and 3-2 at the other or outer ends of the sections" 22 and 23 are also considerably deepened and extend inwardly from the outer ends of the runners 24 and 27 so that the inner ends of the slots 31 and '32 will be relatively flush with the outer edge 57 of a slat 26, Figs. 5 and 6.

The deck 25, Figs. 5, 6, 9, 13 and 14, has the outer side edges of the slats '26 projecting outwardly a predetermined distance from the outer sides of the runners 24, as indicated at 61, Figs. 10, 13 and 14, and thus overhang the runners 24 at their outer side edges. The overhang 61 on each side of the section 22 cooperates with interengaging means 62 on the crate, Figs. 3 and 13 to 15.

The interengaging means 62', Figs. 3 and 13 to 15, comprises spaced apart rails or strips 63, 63 mounted on the inside of opposed crate panels, the rails or strips 63 being shown as being specifically applied to the crate panels 4 and 6, Fig. 3". One rail 63 is shown as being secured to a corner slat L1 and to .a bracing slat '13" of each of the opposed panels, while the other rail 63 is fastened to the bracing slat 13 and the other corner slat 12 of each of the panels 4 and 6, Fig. 15. These rails or strips 63, 63 on opposed panels are adapted to be positioned immediately beneath the projecting ledge 61 at each side of the deck 25. The vertical height of the rails 63 is substantially equal to the height of the runners 24 of the upper pallet section 22. The top of each rail 63 is relatively straight as at- 64, so as to be engaged snugly with the underside of the overhang 61 at each side of the deck 25, Figs. 13 to 15. The lower end of each rail 63 is beveled or rounded, as indicated at 65, to permit the rails to be pressed into place by a sliding action. The rails 63 have their extreme lower ends substantially flush with the lower ends of the crate slats 11 to 13, as well as withthe bottoms of the lower cleats 16 of opposed panels 4 and 6, so that the bottoms of the slats and the bottoms of the lower outer cleats 10 will rest upon the projection 53 at each outer side edge of the bottom rails 27, as clearly shown in Fig. 13. The upper surfaces 64 of the rails 63 are adapted to lie below the lower binding wire 8 of the crate.

The interengaging means 62 preferably comprises the two rails 63, 63 so as to provide for a certain degree of flexibility to permit the crate, when in tube form, to be applied easily in position beneath the overhang 61 of the deck 25. The crate 1, when in tube formation, is canted or tilted in the manner shown in Fig. 11 to allow the rails 63 on the panel 4 to fit under the projection 61 at one side of the deck. The panel 6, then, may be dropped from the position shown in Fig. 11 to the position shown in Fig. 14 and then to final position shown in Fig. 13. The opposed panel 6 is thus snapped in position beneath the remaining overhang 61 of the deck 25.

The crate may be easily applied by first placing the rails 63 of the end panel 4 beneath the overhang 61 in the manner shown in Fig. 11 The panel 6 may be then bowed outwardly slightly, as shown at the bottom of Fig. 12, to allow the rails onpanel 6 to clear the overhang 61, as shown in Fig. 1 4. Downward pressure on the crate I, particularly on the panel 6, then will cause the rails on that panel 6 to assume their locked or snapped on" position as shown in Fig. 13. The upper edge 64 is then below the bottom of the overhang 61, and the vertical slats 11 to 13 and the lower cleats 10 rest on the pro jections 53 with the upper surface 64 of each rail engaging the lower surface of the overhang 61 at each side of the deck 25.

The thickness: of each rail 63 is equal, or substantially equal, to the distance the edges of the slats 26 overhang the' outer sides of the runner 2 4. When the panel 6 finally is slipped into position, the opposed panels 4 and' 6 both will be in the position shown in' Fig. 13 with the slats 11 to 13 and cleats 10 of opposed panels resting on the projection 53 of each of the outside lower runners 27 The inner ends 66 of the rails 63, Fig. 15, are spaced apart, while their outer ends 67 are spaced a predetermined distance inwardly from the outer edges of the corner slats of the panels to which the rails are attached. The panels 4 and 6 have their bottoms extending a predetermined distance below the bottoms of the other panels (panels 3 and so that when the crate is applied, the outer cleats of the panels 4 and 6 will rest upon the projections 53 of the pallet.

The interengaging means 62, while shown specifically as comprising the two rails 63, 63, could, of course, be one continuous rail on each panel 4 and 6. It has been found preferable that the two shorter rails be used so as to provide for greater flexibility as the side panel 6 may be flexed and bowed outwardly in the manner shown in Fig. 12, to permit the tube to be applied easily in place, the crate snapping back into straight line position because of the flexible character of the crate.

The opposed panels 3 and 5 finally come to rest on that part of the runners 24 which projects outwardly from the deck at its opposite ends.

The rails 63 are secured to their panels 4 and 6 by fastening means 68, Figs. 13 to 15, passing through the cleats and slats and into the rails 63. Means for permanently fastening the crate to the pallet may comprise nails, staples, or the like (not shown) which may be driven through the cleats, slats and rails at the bottom of the panels 4 and 6 and into the contacting side edges of the rails 24.

The snap-on or interengaging feature of the invention provides a crate body which is adapted to be snapped in place on a bottom member, such as a pallet by the interlocking of the rails on opposed crate panels with the overhang on opposite sides of the pallet. The snap-on feature of the invention is also adaptable for the application of a wrap-around crate, whereby the crate may be applied in mat form over the pallet with the rails 63 arranged beneath the overhang 61 on each side of the deck 25, the free ends of the binding wires 7 and 8 of the crate being later locked together in any manner desirable, such as by twisting the ends together.

The snap-on feature of the crate is adaptable for use with conventional solid unitary pallets, as well as the two section pallet as hereinbefore described. Also, the binding wires for the pallet 21 may encircle the outer sides of the sections, or they may be woven in and out so that the wires 7 and 8 will be on one side of certain slats and beneath other slats, as shown in Fig. 15.

The binding wires 7 and 8 of the crate 1, while encircling the entire crate 1, may be arranged between the corner slats 11 and 12, and extend over the top of the intermediate or bracing slats 13 of each panel. The

wires 7 and 8, Figs. 1, 2, 11 and 15 to 17, in order to permit the crate 1 to be folded entirely and completely flat, as shown in Fig. 4, are positioned between the outer surface of the corner slats 11 and 12 and the inner surface of the cleats 9 and 10, and across the inside surface of the intermediate bracing slats 13.

It has been found expedient and desirable that the corner slats 11 and 12, and the bracing slats 13, as shown in Figs. 1, 2, 3, 11, 13, 14 and 15, be provided with horizontal grooves to receive the binding wires '7 and 8 to make a better and smoother crate on the inside, as well as retaining all the functions for complete ly fiat folding of the panels of the crate. Figs. 15 to 17, inclusive, show the binding wires 7 and 8 arranged between outer faces of the corner slats 11 and 12 and the inside faces of the cleats. These binding wires 7 and 8 extend along the inside faces of the intermediate bracing slats 13.

The vertical corner slats 11 and 12, Figs. 15 to 17, of each panel, are provided with transverse grooves 69 on their inner faces near the upper and lower ends. The

depth and height of each groove 69 is substantially the same, or slightly smaller, than the diameter of a binding wire 7 or 8. The corner slats 11 and 12, therefore, have upper and lower grooves 69 on their inner surfaces into which the binding wires are received. The binding wires are arranged in their horizontal grooves 69 toward the inner surfaces of the exterior cleats 9 and 10, as clearly shown in Figs. 15 and 17. The intermediate or bracing slats 13, whether they be vertical as shown, or whether they be diagonally positioned, or comprise cross braces, are provided with upper and lower horizontal grooves 70 formed on their inside faces, as shown in Figs. 15 and 16. The size of the slots 70 is the same as the size of the slots 69, and the slots 69 receive the binding wires 7 and 8 in the same manner, the wires extending on the inner faces of the bracing slats 13 in the slots 70 which are formed on the inner faces of the slats 13. Locking, or fastening, staples 71 are arranged on the inner faces of the corner slats 11 and 12, and the intermediate bracing slats 13, and straddle the wires 7 and 8 having their legs entering the cleats, preferably all the way through and clinched on the outer faces of the cleats. The staples 71, thus, securely lock the binding wires 7 and 8 in proper position; prevent any slippage of the binding wires; provide for a smoother interior surface of the crate; and still maintain the proper folding corners 16 and 18 to allow the crate to be fully and completely folded and collapsed, as shown in Fig. 4. The provision of the horizontal slots 69 and 70 to receive binding wires is shown in applicants copending application, Serial No. 618,640, filed October 26, 1956.

The invention provides a new and improved crate that may be snapped on or off of a pallet or other bottom. The bottom, or pallet, is provided with an offset to form a ledge to support the crate. Certain opposed walls, or panels, of the crate may have locking rails or strips applied on the inner surfaces thereof for locking engagement with the protruding side edges of the deck, whereby the crate may be easily slipped on or removed. The snap-on arrangement of the crate with respect to its pallet is a decided advantage in that the pallet may be shipped in flat, or mat, form, as shown in Fig. 5, with one pallet nesting on another, thus preserving space in shipping and storing. Also, the provision of the folding corners permits the crate proper to be completely folded Hat, and when the horizontal grooves 69 and 70 are provided in the slats, the crate will take up even less room, at least an amount equivalent to two thicknesses of binding wire.

The invention herein is shown as being applied to a crate, but the invention, in its broadest sense, not only includes a crate, but a box as well. Also, the crate may be in the form of a tube or in the form of a mat of the wraparound type.

Changes may be made in the form, construction and arrangement of the parts without depending from the spirit of the invention or sacrificing any of its advantages, and the right is hereby reserved to make all such changes as fall fairly within the scope of the following claims.

The invention is hereby claimed as follows:

1. A crate comprising a pair of opposed walls, at least one of a pair of opposed enclosing side walls being capable of being flexed intermediate its ends, other walls hingedly connected to said opposed walls and form.- ing enclosing side walls for the crate, a pallet upon which the crate is mounted, said pallet having side rails of two widths forming a projection on each of the outer sides of outer pallet side rails, said pallet having parts overhanging the upper surfaces of the pallet side rails on opposite sides, strip means having a length materially less than the length of the opposed side walls, said strip means being arranged on the inner surfaces of said opposed crate side walls and engaging the overhanging parts on said opposite sides of the pallet between the overhanging parts and the projection on each side of the pallet rails for interlocking. engagement/ therewith, said strip meansincludinga plurality of. spaced strips and the, outermost ends of the outermost strips being spaced inwardly from the vertical edges of the side walls, said opposed crate side walls resting on top of said projections of the pallet 2. A- crate comprising a plurality of hingedly connected panels, each panel including inner vertically positioned corner slats, upper and lower exterior cleats mounted on the outside faces of said corner slats and fastened thereto, encircling binding wires arranged between the outer faces of the corner slats and the inner faces of the cleats, a pallet upon which the crate is mounted, said pallet comprising an upper section and a lower section, the upper section having spaced side rails, said pallet including a deck on said side rails projecting a distance beyond the outer sides of said side rails forming an overhang on opposite sides of the pallet, said lower section'having spaced rails wider than the rails of the upper section providing an outer projection on each side, binding wires hingedly connecting the two sections together and locking the two sections together, strip means on a pair of opposed panels positioned beneath the overhang on the deck detachably interlocking the crate to the pallet.

3. A crate comprising a plurality of hingedly connected panels, each panel including inner vertically positioned corner slats, upper and lower exterior cleats mounted on the outside faces of said corner slats and fastened thereto, encircling binding wires arranged between the outer faces of the corner slats and the inner faces of the cleats, a pallet upon which the crate is mounted, said pallet comprising an upper section and a lower section, the upper section having spaced side rails and a deck on said side rails projecting a distance beyond the outer sides of said side rails forming an overhang on each side of the pallet, said lower section having spaced rails wider than the rails of the upper section forming an outer projection on each side, binding wires hingedly connecting the two sections together and locking the two sections together, strip means on a pair of opposed panels and adapted to be positioned beneath the overhang on. the deck and above the projections of the lower rails, said opposed panels having the lower ends of the corner slats and bottoms of their lower cleats resting on the projections.

4. A crate comprising a plurality of hingedly connected panels, each panel including. inner vertically positioned corner slats, upper and lower exterior cleats mounted on the outside faces of said corner slats and fastened thereto, encircling binding wires arranged between the outer faces of the corner slats and the inner faces of the cleats, a pallet upon which the crate is mounted, 'sajid pallet comprising an upper section and a lower section, the upper sectionhaVing spaced side rails and a deck on said side rails projecting a distance beyond the outer sides of said side rails forming an overhang on each side of the pallet, said lower section having spaced rails wider than the rails of the upper section forming an outer projection on each side, binding wires hingedly connecting the two sections together and locking the two sections together, strip means on a pair of opposed panels and positioned beneath the overhang on the deck to detachably interlock the crate to the pallet, said corner slats having horizontal grooves formed on their inner surfaces receiving said wires.

5. A crate comprising a body having a plurality of hingedly connected panels, each panel including inner vertically positioned corner slats, bracing slats arranged between said corner slats, upper and lower exterior cleats mounted on the outside faces of said corner slats and said bracing slats and fastened thereto, crate encircling binding wires hingedly connecting said panels together, said binding wires extending across the inside faces of the bracing slats and arranged between the outer faces of the corner slats and the inner faces of the cleats, a pallet upon which. the crate is mounted, said pallet. comprising an upper section and a lower section, the upper section having spaced side rails and a deck. fastened to said side rails projecting a predetermined. distance beyond the outer sides of said side rails forming. an. overhang on each side of the pallet, said lower section having. spaced rails wider than the rails of the upper section and extending. outwardly from the outer sides of the rails. of the first section forming a projection on each side of the pallet, pallet binding wires hingedly connecting the two sections together, said wires locking the two sections together, locking means on a pair of opposed crate panel's positioned beneath the overhang on the deck detachably interlocking the crate to the pallet,

6. A crate comprising a body having a plurality of hingedly connected panels, each: panel including inner vertically positioned corner slats, bracing slats arranged between. said corner slats, upper andlower exterior cleats mounted on. the outside faces of said corner slats and said bracing slats and fastened thereto, crate encircling binding wires hingedly connecting said panels together, said binding wires. extending; across the inside faces of the bracing slats and arranged between the outer faces of the corner slatsand the inner faces of the cleats, a pallet upon which the crate is mounted, said pallet comprising an upper section and. a lower section, the upper section having spaced side rails and a. deck fastened to said side rails projecting. a predetermined distance beyond the outer sides of said side rails forming an overhang on each side of the pallet, said lower section having spaced rails wider thant-he rails of the upper section and extending outwardly from the outer sides of the rails of the first section forming a projection on each side of the pallet, pallet binding wireshingedly connecting the two sections together, said wires locking the two sections together, locking means on a pair of opposed crate panels positioned beneath the overhang on the deck detachably interlocking. the crate to the pallet, said locking means comprising strip means secured to the inner surfaces of a pair of opposed panels adjacent the lower ends thereof.

7. A crate comprising a body having a plurality of hingedly connected panels, each panel including inner vertically positioned. corner slats, bracing slats arranged between said corner slats, upper and lower exterior cleats mounted on the outside faces of said corner slats. and said bracing slats and fastened thereto, crate encircling binding wires hingedly connecting said panels together, said binding wires extending across the inside faces of the bracing slats and arranged between the outer faces of the corner slats and the inner faces of the cleats, a palletv upon which the crate is: mounted, said pallet comprising an upper section and alower section, the upper section having spaced side rails and a deck fastened to said side rails projecting a predetermined distance beyond the outer sides of said side rails forming an overhang on each side of the pallet, said lower section having spaced rails wider than the rails of the upper section and extending outwardly from the outer sides of the rails of the first section forming a projection on each side of the pallet, pallet binding wires hingedly connecting the two sections together, said wires locking the two sections together, locking means on a pair of opposed crate panels positioned beneath the overhang on the deck detachably interlocking the crate to the pallet, said locking means comprising a pair of horizontally disposed spaced apart wood strips mounted on the inner faces of a pair of opposed panels adjacent the lower ends of the opposed panels.

8. A crate comprising a body having a plurality of hingedly connected panels, each panel including inner vertically positioned corner slats, bracing slats arranged between said corner slats, upper and lower exterior cleats mounted on the outside faces of said corner slats and said bracing slats and fastened thereto, crate encircling binding wires hingedly connecting said panels together, said binding wires extending across the inside faces of the bracing slats and arranged between the outer faces of the corner slats and the inner faces of the cleats, a pallet upon which the crate is mounted, said pallet comprising an upper section and a lower section, the upper section having spaced side rails and a deck fastened to said side rails projecting a predetermined distance beyond the outer sides of said side rails forming an overhang on each side of the pallet, said lower section having spaced rails wider than the rails of the upper section and extending outwardly from the outer sides of the rails of the first section forming a projection on each side of the pallet, pallet binding wires hingedly connecting the two sections together, said wires locking the two sections together, locking means on a pair of opposed crate panels positioned beneath the overhang on the deck detachably interlocking the crate to the pallet, said locking means com prising a pair of horizontally disposed spaced apart wood strips mounted on the inner faces of a pair of opposed panels adjacent the lower ends of the opposed panels, said corner slats of each panel having horizontal grooves formed on their outer surfaces at the top and bottom thereof and receiving the crate binding wires.

9. A crate comprising a body having a plurality of hingedly connected panels, each panel including inner vertically positioned corner slats, bracing slats arranged between said corner slats, upper and lower exterior cleats mounted on the outside faces of said corner slats and said bracing slats and fastened thereto, crate encircling binding wires hingedly connecting said panels together, said binding wires extending across the inside faces of the bracing slats and arranged between the outer faces of the corner slats and the inner faces of the cleats, a pallet upon which the crate is mounted, said pallet comprising an upper section and a lower section, the upper section having spaced side rails and a deck fastened to said side rails projecting a predetermined distance beyond the outer sides of said side rails forming an overhang on each side of the pallet, said lower section having spaced rails wider than the rails of the upper section and extending outwardly from the outer sides of the rails of the first section forming a projection on each side of the pallet, pallet binding wires hingedly connecting the two sections together, said wires locking the two sections together, locking means on a pair of opposed crate panels positioned beneath the overhang on the deck detachably interlocking the crate to the pallet, said locking means comprising a pair of horizontally disposed spaced apart wood strips mounted on the inner faces of a pair of opposed panels adjacent the lower ends of the opposed panels, said corner slats of each panel having horizontal grooves formed on their outer surfaces at the top and bottom thereof and receiving the crate binding wires, said bracing V 12 slats having horizontal grooves formed on their inner surfaces at the top and bottom thereof in alinement with the grooves in the corner slats to receive said crate binding wires.

10. A crate comprising a body having a plurality of hingedly connected panels, each panel including inner vertically positioned corner slats, bracing slats arranged between said corner slats, upper and lower exterior cleats mounted on the outside faces of said corner slats and said bracing slats and fastened thereto, crate encircling binding wires hingedly connecting said panels together, said binding wires extending across the inside faces of the bracing slats and arranged between the outer faces of the corner slats and the inner faces of the cleats, a pallet upon which the crate is mounted, said pallet comprising an upper section and a lower section, the upper section having spaced side rails and a deck fastened to said side rails projecting a predetermined distance beyond the outer sides of said side rails forming an overhang on each side of the pallet, said lower section having spaced rails wider than the rails of the upper section and extending outwardly from the outer sides of the rails of the first section forming a projection on each side of the pallet, pallet binding wires hingedly connecting the two sections together, said wires locking the two sections together, locking means on a pair of opposed crate panels positioned beneath the overhang on the deck detachably interlocking the crate to the pallet, said locking means comprising a pair of horizontally disposed spaced apart wood strips mounted on the inner faces of a pair of opposed panels adjacent the lower ends of the opposed panels, said corner slats of each panel having horizontal grooves formed on their outer surfaces at the top and bottom thereof and receiving the crate binding wires, said bracing slats having horizontal grooves formed on their inner surfaces at the top and bottom thereof in alinement with the grooves in the corner slats to receive said crate binding wires, certain panels being spaced apart a distance at least twice the thickness of two corner slats forming a folding corner, the diametrically opposite corner having the panels spaced apart a distance equal to two corner slats, and remaining spaces between adjacent panels being spaced a distance apart equal to the thickness of one slat each, whereby the crate body may be folded completely flat.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,054,378 Williams Feb. 25, 1913 1,490,558 Dunning Apr. 15, 1924 2,177,507 Weiller Oct. 24, 1939 2,272,020 Ridge Feb. 3, 1942 2,651,431 Johnson Sept. 8, 1953 2,743,010 Koester Apr. 24, 1956

Patent Citations
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US1054378 *Jul 13, 1912Feb 25, 1913Williams Folding Box CompanyFolding box.
US1490558 *Nov 23, 1922Apr 15, 1924Dunning James HShipping case
US2177507 *Sep 14, 1936Oct 24, 1939Robert Weiller CharlesFolding box construction
US2272020 *Apr 29, 1938Feb 3, 1942Guy RidgeWire bound package
US2651431 *Oct 12, 1950Sep 8, 1953Bigelow Garvey Lumber CoPacking crate
US2743010 *Dec 12, 1951Apr 24, 1956Libbey Owens Ford Glass CoPackage of curved glass sheets
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3179268 *Sep 14, 1961Apr 20, 1965Richard K HatchArticle handling
US3712499 *Dec 22, 1970Jan 23, 1973Canton Co Of BaltimorePallet-type shipping containers
US3878795 *Apr 20, 1973Apr 22, 1975Rockaway CorpCollapsible pallet container
US4347941 *Mar 17, 1981Sep 7, 1982Gnosjoplast AktiebolagPallet collar
US4650084 *Jul 11, 1985Mar 17, 1987Long Robert WCollapsible box
US5386919 *May 21, 1993Feb 7, 1995Long; Rodney W.Fully collapsible box with reverse mitred cleats