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Publication numberUS2901161 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 25, 1959
Filing dateDec 27, 1955
Priority dateDec 27, 1955
Publication numberUS 2901161 A, US 2901161A, US-A-2901161, US2901161 A, US2901161A
InventorsJohn Henchert
Original AssigneeContinental Can Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container closure and method of forming same
US 2901161 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 25, 1959 J N T 2,901,161

CONTAINER CLOSURE AND METHOD OF FORMING SAME Filed Dec. 27, 1955 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 EILE- INVENTOR J0&72 He 72 cfierZ' Aug. 25, 1959 J. HE NCHE RT 2,

CONTAINER CLOSURE AND METHOD OF FORMING SAME Filed Dec. 27, 1955 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 I INVENTOR Jakn Hench e7 2 ATTORNEYS Aug. 25, 1959 J. HENCHERT CONTAINER CLOSURE AND METHOD OF FORMING SAME Filed Dec. 27, 1955 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 I a2 riff I *x 39 i" V J7 A238 3] INVENTOR United Sttes Patent CONTAINER CLOSURE AND METHOD OF FORMING SAME John Henchert, River Forest, 111., assignor to Continental Can Company, Inc., New York, N.Y., a corporation of New York Application December 27,1955, Serial No. 555,371

4 Claims. (Cl. 229-43) This application is a continuation-in-part of my U.S. application, Serial Number 334,039, filed January 29, 1953, allowed August 11, 1955, now abandoned.

The invention relates to new and useful improvements in a container wherein a metal cover is held on a fiber container body by the interlocking of a bead on the cover with a groove in the body wall.

One object of the invention is to provide the body wall with an upwardly flared upper end portion the upper end or lip of which is tightly held in a channel of the cover by means of the above mentioned interlocking bead and groove, the outer wall of said channel being formed by a depending skirt the lower end of which is widely flared to guide said upper wall end or lip into said channel during cover application, even if said upper wall end or lip should be out-of-round as is frequently the case.

In connection with one form of the invention, another object is to provide a container having a fiber body and a metal cover wherein the body and cover are constructed so that the cover will be held on the body by a beaded portion on the cover snapping into a beaded portion on the body wall with a tightly sealed holding grip and wherein the end portion of the body wall is squeezed into a channel in the metal cover to provide a second tightly sealed contact between the cover and the body wall.

With respect to a second form of the invention, a further object is to provide a novel construction in which the cover channel has substantially cylindrical side walls for relatively extensive contact with the channel-received upper end portion of the body wall, and in which the dimensioning of elements is such that said upper end portion of the body wall will be inwardly deformed into position to enter said channel, by means of a wide flare at the lower end of the cover skirt, during cover application, thereby insuring a very tight seating of the upper end of the container wall in the channel and providing a tight seal between cover and container even if the aforesaid bead and groove be not tightly engaged.

A still further object is to provide a novel method for manufacturing the cover, said method being such as to expedite mass production by machine operations.

By way of illustration, two forms of the invention are shown in the accompanying drawings.

Figure 1 is a side View of a container body closed by the improved metal cover, the body wall being broken away to show the beaded connection between the cover and the beaded Wall.

Figure 2 is a very much enlarged vertical section through a portion of the cover and container bod-y, the cover being in tightly sealed engagement with the body wall.

Figtu'e 3 is a view showing a vertical section through a portion of the cover and a vertical section through a portion of the body Wall with the cover and body in assembling position, but with the cover separated from the container body.

Figure 4 is an enlarged fragmentary Vertical sectional Patented Aug. 25, 1959 View showing a second form of construction, the cover and container being shown in juxtaposition.

Figure 5 is a similar view but showing the cover pressed partially into position on the container body.

Figure 6 is a similar View but showing the cover fully connected with the container body.

Figures 7 to 9 are vertical sectional views illustrating the method of shaping the cover.

Referring to Figures 1 to 3, the container includes a body portion having a tapered body wall 1, which is made of fiber material. Attached to the bottom portion of the body is the usual bottom end. The body wall at the upper portion thereof is upwardly flared or tapered at In and is turned inwardly or back upon itself as shown at 3 and makes intimate contact with the inner face of the body wall to provide a two-ply formation. Said inturned portion 3 and the body wall are headed outwardly as shown at 4 to provide an inwardly facing groove 4a therein which is located near the lower end of the inwardly turned portion 3 of the body wall. The upper end of the body wall has a smooth rounded edge or lip as indicated at S.

The cover 2 for closing the container includes a central depressed portion surrounded by an outwardly tapering (upwardly flared) wall 6. At the lower end of this tapered or flared wall the cover is headed outwardly as shown at 7 and is shaped and dimensioned so that when the cover is placed on the container body and a slight pressure applied this outwardly beaded portion 7 will snap into the groove la in the body wall and make a tight sealed holding contact with the body wall. The bottom wall 8 of the depressed portion of the cover is so disposed relative to the bead '7 that the bead merges into the bottom-Wall and this will greatly strengthen the beaded portion '7 and thereby aid in retaining the shape and position of said head in the tapered wall of the cover.

The cover being of metal will provide a rigid bead which when held to shape and position by the bottom wall of the cover will snap into the groove 4a formed by the heading of the body wall so as to provide a very firm and a tightly sealed contact between the cover and the body wall. The cover 2 has a depending skirt 9 which is spaced away from the tapered wall 6 so as to provide a channel portion 10 adapted to receive the rounded upper end of the body wall, and said skirt at the upper portion 11 thereof is substantially vertical. At the lower portion 12, the skirt flares outwardly and is rolled into a hollow head 13, to guide the lip 5 into the channel portion 10 even if said lip be out-of-round as frequently occurs.

The flared portion of the body wall above the bead 4 initially is at an angle slightly greater than the flare of the cover wall 6 and when the cover is placed on the container body and pressure is applied for seating the cover bead 7 in the groove 4a formed in the body wall by the beading of the same outwardly at 4, there is first a tendency of the upper part of the body wall to spread, but when the lip 5 contacts the vertical wall 11 of the skirt of the cover, said body wall will be forced inwardly into contact with the tapered wall 6 of the cover. The channel in the cover is so dimensioned that this forcing of the body wall into the channel will squeeze the upper end of the body wall and thus make a very tightly sealed engagement between the end of the body wall and the cover.

The cover, when assembled on the container body will not only have a primary tightly sealed engagement between the bead in the cover and the beaded portion of the body wall but it will have a secondary tightly sealed engagement by the squeezing of the body wall into the channel of the cover. The container above described, while capable of other uses, is particularly adapted for creamed cottage cheese. After the container is filledthe lid is laid on the container body after which the container and lid are inverted and pressure applied to the bottom of the container which causes the bead on the body wall to snap into sealing engagement with the bead on the,

cover and the end of the body wall to squeeze into the channel of the cover. This provides a connection which will not allow moisture or odors, dust, etc. to enter the container and, of course, dom not permit the escape of the contents should the package remain in up-ended position for a period of time. The lid, being of metal, is quite rigid and, therefore, when applied to the body wall, it will draw the body wall into a truly round'shape and hold it in such shape at all times.

Referring to Figures 4 to 6, a sheet metal'cover is shown of somewhat different construction than the above described cover 2. The cooperating container body wall, however, is the same as above described andtthe same reference numerals have therefore been employed on this wall and its structural characteristics.

The cover 15 has a bottom 16 and an upwardly flared side wall 17, said flared side. wall having an external bead 18'at its lower end and a substantially cylindrical portion 19 at its upper end. The wall 17 is also prefer ably provided with an outward offset or shoulder 20' joining the substantially cylindrical portion 19 to the major portion of said wall.

At the upper end of the substantially cylindrical Wall portion 19, the cover metal is turned outwardly at 21 and then turned downwardly to provide a skirt 22. The upper portion 23 of this skirt is substantially cylindrical and coacts with the substantially cylindrical wall portion 19 and the outwardly turned portion 21 in providing a downwardly open channel formation 24 which is dimensioned to tightly receive the lip portion 5 of the body wall 1. The outer diameter of this lip portion 5 is normally greater than the internal diameter of the substantially cylindrical skirt portion 23, as seen in Figure 5, and the lower portion 25 of the skirt is widely flared downwardly and hemmed at 26 to inwardly deform said lip portion at 27 (Figure 6) and guide it into the channel formation 24.

During application of the cover to the container, the bead 18 first causes outward yielding of the flared body Wall portion 1a, 3 preparatory to snapping into the groove 4a, as seen in Figure 5. The lip 5 then contacts with the widely flared lower end portion 25 of the skirt 22 as also seen in Figure 5. Upon final downward forcing of the cover, the groove-forming portions of the body Wall contract, the cover bead 18 is received in the groove 4a, andthe flared lower end portion 25 of the skirt 22 earns the lip portion 5 of the body wall into cylindrical form 27 and guides it into the channel formation 24 even if said lip portion be out-of-round. The dimensioning of elements is such that this lip portion 5 is tightly squeezed between the side walls 19 and 23 of the channel formation 24, resulting in a tight seal, evenif the body wall does not fully contract into tight contact with the cover bead 18 after being expanded by said cover bead as shown in Figure 6. To emphasize this, clearance has been shown at 28 in Figure 6 between the bead 18 and the wall of the groove 401. As the bead 18 need not tightly fit the groove 4a and the wall portion 17 neednot contact accurately with the body wall, greater tolerances are permitted in manufacture.

In both forms of the invention, mere disengagement of the cover bead and'channel from the body groove and lip, respectively, instantly frees the cover from the body, due to the upwardly flared upper end of the body wall, whereas if the upper end of said body wall were cylindrical; further upward movement of the cover would be required and during such movement the cover head would frictionally drag on the body wall.

Figures .7, 8 and 9 illustrate a preferred machine method of manufacturing the cover 15. A sheet metal blank,

4. of-circularoutline, is shaped by dies 29 and 30-of-a-press (see Figure 7) into the form of a flared cup 31 provided with a radially projecting lip flange 32, said flange having a downwardly turned outer edge 33. The dies provide the cup side wall with a substantially cylindrical lower portion 34, with a portion 35 flaring upwardly from said portion 34, and with other portions which constitute the cover wall portions 19 and 20'above described and have therefore-been identified by these numerals. Thelower end of the vertical portion 34 curves inwardly at 34a to the cup bottom and later forms the lower portion of the head 18.

The cup 31, shaped as above described, is transferred to a curling and beading machine (Figure 8) having an arcuate curling rail 36, an arcuate beading rail 37, and

a roll 38, the rails 36 and 37 being at the exterior of the cup and the roll 38 within the same. This roll 38 rolls the cup against the rails 36, 37, rail 36 inwardly curls the downturned edge of flange 32 as seen at 39, and the rail 37 and roller 38cooperate in inwardly deforming'the wall portion 3401": Figure 7 into alignment with the flared portion 35 (Figure 7) thereby forming the flared cover wall portion 17 above described and also forming the head 18. Finally, dies 40 and 41 of a press (Figure 9) are utilized to downwardly turn the flange 32 of Figure 8, shape the skirt 22 and flatten the curl 39 (Figure 8) to form the hem 26.

The same method may be used in manufacturing the cover 2 by omitting the steps which form the cover portions 19 and 20, and the step which flattens the skirt curl into a hem.

From the foregoing, it will be seen that novel and advantageous provision has been made for attaining the desired ends. Attention is invited, however, to the possibility of making variations within the scope of the invention as claimed.

I claim:

1. A container for food products comprising a tapered fiber body having an open outwardly flared end portion thereof turned back into intimate contact with the inner face of said flared end portion, said body wall and said turned back portion adjacent the lower end thereof being beaded outwardly, and a metal cover for said fiber body having a central substantially flat bottom surrounded by; a flared wall, said flared wall of the cover at the lower portion thereof being beaded outwardly and shaped. to smoothly join with the bottom and to conform to. the; head in the body wall and dimensioned so as to snap into said body wall head when assembled thereon and make a tight seal between the body wall and cover, said metal cover having an offset depending skirt, the upper portion of which is substantially vertical and forms with said flared portion of the cover a channel adapted to receive the upper end of the body wall, the lower portion of the, skirt being flared outwardly and then rolled inwardly to provide a hollow head, said flared portion of the body wall above the bead being initially at an angle slightly greater than the flare of the cover wall and adapted when the cover is placed on the body wall to contact with the vertical wall on the skirt of the cover whereby the body wall is forced inwardly into contact with the flared wall of the cover and squeezed into the channel so as to make atight seal therewith.

2. A container for food products comprising a fiberbody having a side Wall provided with an upwardly flared upper end portion, said flared portion being outwardly beaded near its lower end to provide it with an inwardly facing groove, and a metal cover having a bottom and an upwardly flared side wall, said cover side wall having an external bead at its lower end and a substantially cylindrical portion at its upper end, said bead being smoothly joined with the bottom and dimensioned to snap into the aforesaid groove during cover application, the metal being turnedoutwardly from the upper end of said substanfidiii tially cylindrical wall portion and then turned downwardly to provide a skirt, the upper portion of said skirt being substantially cylindrical and coacting with said substantially cylindrical wall portion and said outwardly turned portion in providing a downwardly open channel formation which is dimensioned to tightly receive the upper end of the flared body wall portion upon cover application, the outer diameter of said upper end of said flared body wall portion being greater than the inner diameter of said substantially cylindrical upper portion of said skirt so that said upper end of said body wall is deformed inwardly as it is received in said cover channel, said skirt having a Widely flared lower end portion to inwardly squeeze said upper end of said flared body wall portion into said channel formation as the cover is pressed into final position.

3. A structure as specified in claim 2, in which the cover side wall flare merges into the side wall cylindrical portion through an outward olfset providing in the closed container a spacing between the cover and body wall flares just beneath said offset.

4. A structure as specified in claim 2, in which the upper end portion of the fiber body wall is folded back upon itself to provide a two-ply formation for said upwardly flared body wall portion, both plies of said twoply formation being outwardly beaded to form said inwardly facing groove, and in which the cover side Wall flare merges into the side wall cylindrical portion through an outward offset providing in the closed container a spacing between the cover and body wall flares just be neath said oifset.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 889,758 Burke June 2, 1908 889,986 Taylor June 9, 1908 1,249,096 Hulme Dec. 4, 1917 2,306,255 Scott Dec. 22, 1942 2,492,500 Priest Dec. 27, 1949 2,568,697 Amber-g Sept. 25, 1951 2,679,816 Moore June 1, 1954 2,693,307 Goodwin Nov. 2, 1954 2,739,557 Staubitz Mar. 27, 1956

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US889758 *Apr 14, 1905Jun 2, 1908Mariana MonroePaper milk-bottle.
US889986 *Apr 12, 1907Jun 9, 1908Mono Service Vessels LtdMilk-receptacle.
US1249096 *Dec 4, 1915Dec 4, 1917Robert HulmeReceptacle-cover.
US2306255 *Oct 22, 1940Dec 22, 1942Hans A EggersContainer structure
US2492500 *Apr 14, 1947Dec 27, 1949Continental Can CoMetal end closure for waxed paper container bodies
US2568697 *Sep 24, 1948Sep 25, 1951Lily Tulip Cup CorpPaper closure member for paper containers
US2679816 *May 20, 1950Jun 1, 1954Williston Seamless Can Co IncApparatus for drawing seamless cans
US2693307 *Feb 9, 1953Nov 2, 1954American Seal Kap CorpCap for paper cups
US2739557 *Jun 4, 1951Mar 27, 1956Charles Nevin FouseMethod and apparatus for deep drawing of metals
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2972432 *Feb 27, 1958Feb 21, 1961Lily Tulip Cup CorpFlexible thermoplastic nestable closure lids
US3001666 *Jun 9, 1959Sep 26, 1961Caproni Raymond C EContainer closure
US3137409 *Jan 23, 1963Jun 16, 1964Sweetheart PlasticsContainer cover
US3620437 *Mar 6, 1967Nov 16, 1971Alan Iw Frank Corp TheCup and lid
US3924413 *Dec 4, 1973Dec 9, 1975Marsh Jr Richard OFittings and the like for pipe piling
US4114669 *Feb 9, 1976Sep 19, 1978Marilyn BishopSterile port structure
US20110095030 *Apr 28, 2011Dave DunnContainer assembly having a heat-sealed metal end, a metal end therefor, and a method for making same
DE3837786A1 *Nov 8, 1988May 18, 1989Llamas SaImproved metal container with an air-tight lid
EP0168000A1 *Jul 5, 1985Jan 15, 1986Deutsche Präzisions-Ventil GmbHMounting cup for aerosol dispensing containers
WO1986000599A1 *Jul 5, 1985Jan 30, 1986Praezisions Ventil GmbhValve cap for pressure gas packages
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/125.17, 138/89
International ClassificationB21D51/44, B21D51/38, B65D43/02, B65D43/04
Cooperative ClassificationB65D2543/00509, B65D2543/00731, B65D2543/0062, B65D2543/00555, B65D2543/00796, B65D2543/00092, B65D2543/00537, B65D43/021, B65D2543/00277, B21D51/44, B65D2543/00685
European ClassificationB65D43/02S3D, B21D51/44