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Publication numberUS2905169 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 22, 1959
Filing dateMar 10, 1955
Priority dateMar 10, 1955
Publication numberUS 2905169 A, US 2905169A, US-A-2905169, US2905169 A, US2905169A
InventorsHerbert E Nieburgs
Original AssigneeHerbert E Nieburgs
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Device for cancer detection
US 2905169 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 22, 1959 H. E. NIEBURGS 2,905,169

DEVICE FOR CANCER DETECTION Filed March 10, 1955 T5, 2 V a j E v INVENTOR.

, Han ar-6 Mesa/vas- United States Patent Ofiiee 2,995,169 Patented Sept. 22, 1959 DEVICE FOR CANCER DETECTION Herbert E. Nieburgs, Forest Hills, N.Y. Application March 10, 1955, Serial No. 493,520

8 Claims. (Cl. 1282) The present invention is directed to the detection of cancer, more particularly to a device and a method of using it which is specifically adaptable to the cervix uteri.

Devices for collecting specimens of tissue for the purpose of microscopic examination to determine the pres ence of malignant growths have been proposed; among such devices was a pair of forceps having long and short jaws between which a sponge was held. One of the jaws was roughened in order that it may loosen tissue to be held by the sponge and afterward examined. The operation thereof was unsatisfactory in that the person operating the device often was unable to place it properly to take up that tissue which it was desired to examine. The necessity of rubbing the device against the tissue caused tearing of and damage to healthy tissue to the discomfort of the patient. The microscopic examination of the sponge was inconvenient and the results were uncertain.

The present invention is intended and adapted to overcome the difficulties and disadvantages inherent in prior devices of the type above referred to, it being among the objects of the invention to provide a device for the taking of specimens of tissue from body cavities which can be accomplished by the person without the necessity of assistance from skilled individuals.

It is also among the objects of the invention to provide a device which is simple in construction and which may be effectively operated by relatively unskilled persons for self-examination, with accurate results. It is further among the objects of the invention to devise a method of-operation whereby specimens of cells may be taken and the subsequent examination thereof may be made at a remote point by skilled persons.

In practicing the present invention, there is provided a tampon device which is inserted by the individual into the cervical region and held there for a suflicient length of time to absorb cells and fluids. The material of said tamponmay be of any suitable character but preferably a nylon or other synthetic sponge may be used which softens and swells at its absorbs the secretions. In order to permit better absorption by said sponge of the cells, the; sponge is treated with a mucolytic agent, such as hyaluronidase, which dissolves-the mucous plug of the cervix. f

Thenithe individualremoves the sponge and inserts it into a suitable container, 'such;as a box, which has therein at least one microscope; slide, 'usually of glass. The sponge,-either directly or. indirectly contacts the slide and, upon the application-of pressure some of the secre tions including cells picked up from the tissues are transferred to the slide in the form of a smear. The container,

with or without the sponge, is' sealed and is forwarded by the individual to a suitablel'aboratory for microscopic examination of the slide. In one embodiment the contrainer is a narrow, elongated box having a slide cemented or otherwise attached to the bottomand to the inside of the cover of the box; the individual places the sponge in the box, the end'of which is open, 'forces the cover in place thus compressing the sponge against the slide, pulls the string which is attached to the sponge through said open end, drawing the sponge out of the box and causing it to make smears on both slides. Then the end is closed and the box forwarded for examination of the smears.

The invention is more fully described in connection with the accompanying drawings constituting a part hereof and in which like reference characters indicate like parts, and in which- Fig. l is a perspective view of a tampon device which is used in the first stage of the procedure, some parts being broken away for clearness;

Fig. 2 is an exploded perspective view of a container adapted for the invention and having a sponge therein;

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of the container of Fig. 2, showing the open end thereof and the sponge being pulled through; I

Fig. 4 is a transverse cross-sectional view thereof taken along line 44 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a transverse cross-sectional view of a modified form of container for the practice of the present invention, and

Fig. 6 is an exploded perspective view of the container of Fig. 5, showing the sponge as it is being inserted therein.

Referring to the form of the invention illustrated in Figs. 1 to 4, there is shown in Fig. l a type of tampon device which is particularly suitable for the present purpose. It consists of a tube 1 of cardboard or other material and a plunger 2 of tubular form operating in said tube. A tampon 3 is the open end of said tube or cylinder 1 is of any suitable form and material; it has a drawstring 4 attached at the inner end, said drawstring being threaded through plunger 2. Within tube 1 between tampon 3 and plunger 2 is a wad of felted material such as cotton batting or the like. It also is provided with a drawstring 6 at its inner end which is threaded through plunger 2 alongside drawstring 4.

In use for self-examination, the individual inserts the device of Fig. 1 into the vagina and pushes forward plunger 2, causing tampon 3 and wad 5 to be pushed out of cylinder '1, after which the combination of tube and plunger is removed, leaving tampon 3 in contact with the cervix and wad 5 in place to hold the tampon from accidentally shifting out of its position. After a suitable period of time of contact, usually from 4 to 24 hours, drawstrings 4 and 6 are grasped and pulled, removing both the tampon and wad, the latter being discarded.

The individual then places tampon 3 in the bottom of the box shown in Fig. 2. It has sides 7 and 8 and an end 9. A glass slide 10 of the well-known type is in the bottom of said box and is held in place by a suitable cement, sponge 3 resting on said slide. The opposite end of the box is provided with a hinged flap 11 having a loop 12 extending from the upper edge thereof. End 9 also has a loop 13 extending from the upper edge thereof. Cover 14 has depending sides 15 and 16 adapted to fit over sides 7 and 8 of the box, respectively. A flap 17 corresponding to flap 11 of the box, is hinged to the top and is provided with a slot 18 through which loop 12 is adapted to pass. The opposite end of cover 14 has a slot 19 through which loop 13 is adapted to pass. A slide 20 is cemented to the inside of cover 14.

With the elements in the position shown in Fig. 2, cover 14 is pressed onto the box with loop 13 entering slot 19; the loop is of relatively stiff metal and is bent over to hold the box and cover together. Flaps 11 and 17 are in open position as shown in Fig. 3. Usually the distance between slides 10 and 20 is small, of the order of 4 inch, so that sponge 3 is compressed against the slides. The individual then pulls drawstring 4, causing secretions from sponge 3 to smear over the contacting faces of said slides, thus providing two specimens for examination. Then flap 11 is lifted to cause loop 12 to pass through slot 18, flap 17 is folded over flap 11, and loop 12 is bent over flap 17. By reason of the stiffness of the metal of loop 12 it holds the ends of box and cover securely in closed position. Usually sponge 3 is pulled completely from the container before it is closed, but it may be allowed to remain therein if desired.

The closed container is forwarded to the laboratory for the determination of the character of the cells on the slides as to malignancy. The container may be delivered personally or it may be wrapped and addressed for mailing to the laboratory.

fA modified form of the invention is shown in Figs. and 6. It consists of a bottom or box 21 having the usual glass slide 22 attached thereto or laid thereon. Fitted between sides 23 and 24 is top 25 having a closed end 26. An end flap 27 mounted on bottom 21 by hinge 28 has a depressed portion 29 adapted to fit into a corresponding portion on top 25 to act as a latch to keep the container closed. Top 25 has a circular extension 30 within which the material of top 25 is removed and replaced by a suitable mesh material, such as fine metal. The space 32 between mesh 31 and slide 22 is relatively small, usually less than inch. Cover 33 has depending sides 34 fitting over extension 30. The cover carries radial pin 35 which is adapted to fit into bayonet slot 36.

In use, the individual places in extension 30 sponge 3, which has been exposed to the secretions of the cervix and vagina. Then cover 33 is forced onto sponge 30 compressing it against mesh 31, pin 35 enters slot 36 and the cover is twisted to lock it in position. Thereby cell specimens pass through mesh 31 and are transferred onto slide 22. For the purpose of examination flap 27 is opened and slide 22 removed from the container.

This system has the advantage that individuals who may be reluctant to be examined by others may take the specimens themselves and the examination of the slides may take place in their absence. Of considerable importance is the fact that in outlying sections where medical facilities are few or non-existent, in small communities where expert medical attention is not readily available, and in places where diagnostic laboratories are lacking, the individuals may take the specimens and by sending them to designated centers obtain prompt and efiicient examination. The procedure has been tested in a considerable number of cases and has been found to be completely accurate even though the specimens were taken by unskilled individuals.

Although the invention has been described setting forth two specific embodiments thereof, the invention is not to be limited thereto as various changes in the details may be made without departing from the principles herein set forth. For instance, any other tampon device may replace that shown in Fig. l which is capable of absorbing the endocervical secretions and cells. Other materials may be used for the tampon and wad than those described. The shape of the tampon may be other than cylindrical; for example, globular, ellipsoidal or the like. The con-- struction of the containers may be changed, the covers may be hinged to the boxes and other means may be provided for closing the containers and for obtaining access thereto, One or more slides may be incorporated and the shape of the slides may be other than rectangular. Although the slides are usually of glass, they may be of any suitable material such as certain synthetic plastics. The containers may be made of cellulosic materials, metals, plastics and the like, in whole or in part. With the device there may be included a form to be filled in by the individual, giving such data as will be helpful to the diagnose tician.

These and other changes may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention, which is to be broadly construed and to be limited only by the claims appended hereto.

Among such changes is included the use of an absorbent wad or tampon which may be attached by the individual to the nipple of the breast for a sufiicient time to absorb fluids therefrom; then a smear is made on a slide as set forth above. Another application consists in attaching a string to a compressed wad and swallowing said wad so that it reaches the stomach where it remains for a sufiicient time to absorb substances, after which it is removed by pulling up the string; the smear is made as heretofore described. 7

I claim:

1. A device for obtaining cell specimens for diagnosis comprising a container and a cover for the same, a slide in said container, a tampon adapted to be introduced into said container, said tampon containing cell specimens, said cover being pressed onto said tampon to cause said cell specimens to adhere to said slide to form a smear, and means for retaining said cover on said container.

2. A device for obtaining cell specimens for diagnosis comprising a container and a cover for the same, a slide in said container, a tampon adapted to be introduced into said container, said tampon containing cell specimens, said cover being pressed onto said tampon to cause said cell specimens to adhere to said slide to form a smear, the end of said container adapted to be opened, and means for retaining said cover on said container.

3. A device for obtaining cell specimens for diagnosis comprising a container and a cover for the same, a slide in said container, a tampon adapted to be introduced into said container, said-tampon containing cell specimens, said cover being pressed onto said tampon to cause said cell specimens to adhere to said slide to form a smear, the end of said container adapted to be opened and providing means for drawing said tampon from said con miner, an mea s fo ret ing said cover on said container.

4. A device for obtaining cell specimens for diagnosis comprising a container and a cover for the same, a slide in said container, a tampon adapted to be introduced into said container, said tampon containing cell specimens, said cover being. pressed onto said tampon to cause said cell specimens to adhere to said slide to form a smear, the end of said container and cover being hinged to allow access to the inside of said container, and means for retaining said cover on said container.

5. A device for obtaining cell specimens for diagnosis comprising a container and a cover for the same, a slide in said container and a second slide in said cover, a tampon adapted to be introduced into said container, said tampon containing cell specimens, said cover being pressed onto said tampon to cause said cell specimens to adhere to said slides to form smears, and means for retaining said cover on said container.

6. A device for obtaining cell specimens for diagnosis comprising a container and a cover therefor, a slide in said container, said container carrying a circular extension on the cover thereof, said extension communicating with said container, a tampon containing cell specimens and adapted to be introduced into said container, a circular cover fitting on said extension and adapted to compress said tampon in said extension and cause said specimens to be deposited on said slide.

7. A device for obtaining cell specimens for diagnosis comprising a container and a cover therefor, a slide in said container, said container carrying a circular extension on the cover thereof, said extension communicating with said container, a mesh in said extension, a tampon held on said mesh and containing cell specimens and adap ed to be introduced into said container, a circular cover fitting on said extension and adapted to compress Said tampon in said extension andcause said cell specimens .1 b p s t d on s id slide.

j .8. A device for obtaining cell specimens for diagnosis comprising a container and a cover therefor, a slide in References Cited in the file of this patent said container, said container carrying a circular extcn- UNITED STATES PATENTS S1011 on the cover thereof, said extension commumcatmg with said container, a tampon containing cell specimens 2,046,566 Lucas y 1936 and adapted to be introduced into said container, a circu- 5 lat cover fitting on said extension and adapted to com- OTHER REFERENCES press said tampon in said extension and cause said speci- Brunschwlgz A Method for Mass Screening for Cytomens to be deposited on said slide and means for openlogical Detection of Carcinoma of e C 'e ing said container for removal of said slide. Cancer, vol. 7; November 1954, pp. 1182-1184.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2046566 *Jan 16, 1935Jul 7, 1936Junious G LucasMethod of and means for preserving the sediment test of a fluid
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3224434 *Nov 6, 1962Dec 21, 1965Waldemar Medical Res FoundatioCell collector
US3508655 *Feb 3, 1967Apr 28, 1970IbmCell extraction and collection apparatus
US3592186 *Jan 28, 1969Jul 13, 1971Oster ClaudeCytologic scraper
US3640268 *Oct 23, 1965Feb 8, 1972Davis Hugh JMethod and device for biopsy specimen collecting and handling
US3712296 *Dec 8, 1970Jan 23, 1973Gradone FSwab device for medical specimens
US3774590 *Jun 22, 1971Nov 27, 1973Mcdonald BUterine specimen collecting method
US3776219 *Sep 15, 1972Dec 4, 1973Metpath IncCervical scraper
US3815580 *Aug 31, 1972Jun 11, 1974Oster CApparatus for and method of collecting and preserving cytologic samples
US3867924 *Feb 5, 1973Feb 25, 1975Microbyx CorpInternal blood collection
US3877464 *Aug 17, 1973Apr 15, 1975Vermes Andrew RIntra-uterine biopsy apparatus
US3934575 *Aug 23, 1974Jan 27, 1976Louis BucaloTampon device to test for micro-organisms
US3995618 *Jun 16, 1975Dec 7, 1976Richardson-Merrell Inc.Cervical tissue cell-gathering device
US3998211 *Dec 20, 1974Dec 21, 1976Louis BucaloStructures for growing cultures within human and animal bodies
US4014322 *Oct 23, 1975Mar 29, 1977The Kendall CompanySpecimen collecting device and method
US4232673 *Aug 11, 1975Nov 11, 1980Louis BucaloMethod for collecting and processing body fluids
US4266022 *Jul 10, 1978May 5, 1981Kommanditgesellschaft SchwarzhauptProcess for the determination of at least one of the iso-enzymes of lactatedehydrogenase
US4418702 *Dec 17, 1981Dec 6, 1983Metpath Inc.Method and apparatus for collecting saliva
US4580577 *Aug 9, 1983Apr 8, 1986Brien Joseph OMethod and apparatus for collecting saliva
US5468236 *Jun 9, 1993Nov 21, 1995Kimberly-Clark CorporationDisposable absorbent product incorporating chemically reactive substance
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US6007498 *Mar 9, 1998Dec 28, 1999A.Fem Medical CorporationMethod and apparatus for collecting vaginal fluid and exfoliated vaginal cells for diagnostic purposes
US6168609Sep 10, 1998Jan 2, 2001Deka Products Limited PartnersCatamenial collector and methods of use
US6174293Dec 27, 1999Jan 16, 2001A-Fem Medical CorporationMethod and apparatus for collecting vaginal fluid and exfoliated vaginal cells for diagnostic purposes
US6200275 *Mar 25, 1999Mar 13, 2001Avitar IncorporatedSample collection device with extraction sleeve
US7294502May 28, 2002Nov 13, 2007Envitec-Wismar Gmbhsuch as saliva, comprising an absorbent pad and two housing parts connected in a movable manner and enclose the absorbent pad; permits easy and safe handling when taking a sample and when transferring the sample for testing
US8053625Dec 14, 2006Nov 8, 2011Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Absorbent articles including a body fluid signaling device
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EP0056241A1 *Jan 6, 1982Jul 21, 1982MetPath, Inc.Apparatus for collecting saliva
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Classifications
U.S. Classification600/572, 604/371, 604/15, 604/904
International ClassificationA61B10/02, A61B10/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S604/904, A61B10/0291
European ClassificationA61B10/02U