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Publication numberUS2905474 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 22, 1959
Filing dateAug 10, 1955
Priority dateAug 10, 1955
Publication numberUS 2905474 A, US 2905474A, US-A-2905474, US2905474 A, US2905474A
InventorsJahr Marvin A
Original AssigneeJahr Marvin A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Push peg puzzle
US 2905474 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 22, 1959 JAHR l 2,905474 PUSH PEG PUZZLE Filed Aug. 10, 1955 1 Fig. 2 Marwh A Jahr 1 I BY m AT'TORNEY INVENTOR United States Patent PUSH PEG PUZZLE Marvin A. Jahr, St. Paul, Minn.

Application August 10, 1955, Serial N0. 527,461

8 Claims. (Cl.273-153) This invention relates to a toy puzzle. More particularly the invention concerns an intriguing peg toy puzzle for finger operation in aligning a multiplicity of apertures ;inoif-set relationship to properly position a multiplicity of pegs in the aligned ofi-set apertures. A feature of the present invention is to provide an intr iguingtoy for children which is easy to understand and simple to operate, yet provides the child with amusement and training in the use of his fingers and exercise of judgment and patience in solving a puzzle toy.

Another feature of this invention is to provide an in- .triguing finger operable peg toy puzzle With multiple pegs zle toy formed of a plurality of apertured blocks in stacked relation about a pivot point and provided with a plurality of finger operable pegs movable into and out of the apertures when properly aligned but self-locking t o prevent complete withdrawal frorn the apertures in the blocks in their stacked relationship.

Further features, objects and advantages will be apparent from the following description of the accompanying drawings.

Figure 1 is a side elevational view of the toy showing extending through aligned openings.

Figure 2 is an explocled perspective of the toy.

Figure 3 is a top plan view of the toy in modified forrn showing an aligned relationship of the parts thereof.

In the following description like parts Will be similarly indicated.

The toy ernbodied in this description includes a multiplicity of stacking blocks which are illustrated by a base section 10, an intermediate section 11 and a top section 12., Bach of the diflerent sections has a plurality of aligned apertures therein in oiT-set relationship and insertable pegs, as hereinafter described.

The base block seotion 10 comprises preferably a rounded block 13 having an upright peg 14 formed therewith or seated and wedged or secured in a centered aperture l5. A plurality of spaced apertures 16, 17, 18 and 19 are countersunk in seemingly balanced relationship, fromthe peripheral edge of base 10, but actually have about one-sixteenth inch side displacement from the outer periphery of base 10 With respect to their independent relationshipWith one another. These apertures inbloek 10 are cooperatively aligned With the different apertures in blocks 11 and 12, hereinafter describe'd, and as provided in the arrangement shown in Figure 2.

all of the openings in alignment and with the peg 34 or more 2ipertured'block elements illustrated as preferably the rounded block 21 having the centered aperture 22 therethrough. The aperture 22 permits block 21 to slide over peg 14 and seat on block 13 in a freely pivotal relationship therevvith. A plurality of spaced apertures 23, 24, 25 and 26 extend all the way through block 21 and are ofl-set in the exact manner as the countersunk apertures 16, 17, 18 and 19, in base block 10, so that they are aligned when in the relative Position as illustrated in Figure 2.

(I'he top section 12 is preferably a rounded block 28 cf the Same size and general configuration of the blocks 13 and 21. -I'he block 28 is also provided with a center aperture 29 for pivotally mounting the block 28 on peg 14. A plurality of apertures 30, 31, 32 and 33 extend throligh the block 28 in a spaced relationship. This relationship exactly corresponds to the spacing and positioning of the like apertures in blocks 13 and 21 when turned into an aligned position for proper entry of the finger operating sliding or reciprocating keys or pegs 34, 35, 36, and 37, in the manner as hereinafter described. A groove 39 is out into and about the outside peripheral edge 40 of block 28- and holds a peg retaining spring 41. Bach of the pegs 34, 35, 36 and 37 are provided with a shoulder 43, as illustrated in Figures 1 and 2. Inasmuch as all the Slip pegs, a s herein described are provided Wtih sirnilar shoulderS 43 which operate alike, only' one is described in detail. The shoulder 43is forrnedby reducing or cutting down, for example, the diaineter of the peg 35 at the point 44 adjacent its end 45. The end 45 is of the Same diameter as the Stern portion of the slip peg 35 so that the whole of the peg slides through the proper apertures 31, 24 and into 17 when they are in proper alignment. As the slip peg 35 and other like pegs are attempted to be Withdrawn from block 28, the spring 41 rides into the reduced diameter portions 44 and locks against sirnilar shoulders 43 in each of the slip pegs as herein described.

When the blocks 21 and 28 are mounted over upright 14, in the ma imer shown in Figure 1 a cap 45 is glued, wedged or othe'rwise secured over the end of .upright 14. The cap 45 holds the end sections 10 and 12 in loose fitting or freely pivotal relationship relative to the intermediate section 11. Thus in the illustrated arrangement the respective end sections 10 and 12 can be independently turned relative to the intermediatesection 11 When the slide pegs 34, 35, 36 and 37 are mounted in block 28 and Withdrwn to the point at which shoulders 43 are locked against complete withdrawal by spring 41. As shown in Figure 1, the slip peg 34 and the balance of the slip pegs, as herein described, are longer than the depth of the aligned apertures in order to provide for finger manipulation.

When the outside block sections 10 and 12 are mounted with an intermediate sec'tion 11 on a standard or supporting pos t 14 With the relative set or grup of apertures 30, 23 and 16 in alignment, then the balance of the relative set or group of apertures 31, 24 and 17, set o1. group 32, 25 and 18, and set or group 33, 26 and 19 are also aligned to pr0perly receive the pegs 34, 35, 36 and 37, respectively. With all {the pegs 34, 35, 36 and 37 withdrawn until shoulders 43 are engaged by spring 41 in the manner illustrated by.pegs 35, 36 and 37, as shown in Figure 1, the blo'ck sections 10, 11 andl2 can be independently rotated to misalign the relative sets or groups of apertures, as described. Ihereafter the problem is to realign all the v relative sets or groups in order t o push the pegs 34 35,

' The intermediate section 11 is representative of one 36 and 37 all the way down into apert ures 16, 17, 18 and 19, respectively.

As illustrated in the top view shown in Figure 3, the structure therein, represented by top block section 28, is a similar st'acking arrangement, as described, -with the 3 aligned aperture groups o1 sets represented by the numbers 47, 48, 49 and 50. These aperture sets are drilled as a group in a relatively different oif-set relationship. The aperture gmups representeri by the nuxnbers 47 and 48 are dri lied in o he body cf the block. secfions ata Sligli tlY greater iiistance vfrbrn the block peripheries than the aperture groups 53 and 54. The pegs 51, 52, 53 and 54 are construoted in a manner similar to theheretofore described pegs 34, 35, 36 and 37, With the exeeption of the stem. sec io.n eing provided witl 1 groeves 55"56 57 and 58, respectiveljr. These grooves 55, 56, 57 and 58 serve as retaining guides for pin ends 60, 61, 62 and 63 Which are driven into the side of top section 28',and

spring 41. Whe n one 01 more of the aperture groups 47, 48, 49 and 50 are not in ali gnment the relative block section or sectidrxs must be turned until realignment is obtained to properlypush each of the pegs 51, 52, 53 and 54 evenly into the block sections By preventing the withdrawal of the sliding pegs, as described, the relative Positioning of the apertures, as described, cannot be seen. For simplification of the problem ofalignment one of the ets or groups of apertures, for exarnplegroup 47 with its respective peg 51 and pin Stop 60, can be dispensed with and only the rernaining three sets o1 groups of apertures 48, 49 and 50 drilled in an oflset relationship, to provide the problem of aperture alignrnent for properly reeeiving pegs 52, 53 and 54 thereinto in the marmer described. Any misalignment of the apertures by rotation of one or more of the apertured block sections will prevent the proper entry of any one or more of the pegs into any one or more of the block sections. Otherwise in the arrangement shown in Figure 2, the block 13 may be a statiqnary base with an upri ght 14 upon which the seotions 11 and 12 are ielat ively pivotally rnonted for alignment of pegs or keys 34, 35 36 and 37 in spaced relative apertures 23, 24, 25 and 26. For economy in manufacture the toy structure described herein is preferably formed of wood. However, it will be re co gnized that the structure can be a molded plastic, metal 0r a,;;ombination of these materials.

In ;cordance wit h thepaten stat11tes Lhave.desefibed the principles of construction and operation'of my push peg puzzle, and while I have endeavored to set forth the best embodirnent thereof, I desire to have it l lnclerstood that changes may be made within the scope of the follow ing c laims without departing from the spirit Qf myinven tion. v

I claim:

1. A peg toy puzzle stru cturecomprising a eo rnbination of pivotal block sections arran ged in stacked relationship, a plurality of independent apertures in each of said block sections in diliferently spaced relationship to the edge'periph ries.thereofsaid apertures bfiingin ali'gnment through said blocksections wh en in one position and in an oiT-set relationship to each other with said lo k sect on in anv h er positiom and a plu a ty Qf iege conibletelyinsertable in said alignrhent of aper ures in said one position but n 0t c:0mpletely insertable in said apertures in any other position.

2. A peg toy uzzle structu re comprising in combinati on a base section, a standard on said base section, an intermediate pivotal sect ion mounted on said standard, a top section mountedon said sta'ndardover saidinterrnedite pivotal section, seeurin'g inearis'hialding said isedti0ns in stacked relationship, each 0f said sections being provided with a plurality of aperture sin diiferent offset relationship relative t0 the edge peripheries of said sections and all in aligned relationship when the-said seetions are in one relative position and notall in -aligned relationship when said sections are in anothei relative relationship, and finger.operable pegs mounted in the a;ier-v tures of said top section insertable in all of said apertures in the said sections in the one relative relationship but not insertable in all of said apertures when said sections are in another relative relationship.

3. A peg toy puzzle structure cornprising in combination a base section having a plurality cf spaced apertures therein, a pivot mounted on said base about which said apertures are angularly spaced, an encl section mounted on said pivot having a plurality of apertures therethrough angularly spaced about said pivot, an intermediate pivotal section freely encireling said'pivot and having a plurality of apertures therethrough angularly spaced about said pivot, the distance between the axes ofeach pair of adjacent angularly spaced apertures being different from the distance between the axes of other pairs of adjacent angularly spaced apertures in each section, said pluralities of angularly spaced apertures in said base section, end section, and intermediate section being alignecl when all of said sections are in one rotated position and misalighed when said sections are in any other relative position; peg means slidably supported in said apertures in said end section and slidable into and out of said apertures in said intermediate vseetion and base sectionwhen said sections are in said rotative position, and not insertable into said spaced apertures when said sections are in any o ther rotative relation, and cooperative stop means 011 said-peg and said end section to prevent complete removal of said peg means from said apertures in said end section. 4. A peg toy puzzle comprising in combination aplurality cf independently pivotal blocks mounted in stacked relation for ro'tation abot a common pivot axis and having a plurality of apertures which are angularly spaced about the pivot axis, the distance between the axes of each pair of adjacent angularly spaced apertures being diiferent frorn the distance between the axes of other pairs of adjacent angularly spaced apertures in each section, the apertures-in the individual blocks being aligned when the blocks are pivoted to one relative position about said common axis, at least one aperture of one of the blocks being rni saligned with an aperture of another block when said bloeks are pivoted to any other position, and peg mea ns slidably insertable irrte said apertures when the blocks are pivoted to the said one relative position.

S. The strueture of claim 4 and including stop means -for preventing the complete withdrawal of said peg nieans from all of said apert ures.

6. The strueture of claim 4 wherein the said pivotal blocks are mounted in stacked relation on a centered support including said cornmon pivot axis, said centered support-including securing means thereon securing said blocks together in pivotal relationship.

7. A peg toy puzzle eomprising in combination a plurality cf independently pivotal blocks mounted in stacked relationship for rotation about a common axis and having a plurality of spaced aligned apertures which are aligned when the blocks are pivoted to one relative position about said common axis, at least one aperture of one of said blocks being misaligned with an aperture of another block when the blocks are pivoted to any other position, peg means insertable into said aperture s when the bloeks are pivoted to the said one relative position, and stop means for preventing the complete withdrawl of said pe g means from all of said apertures, said stop means comprising cooperative shoulder means on said peg means and a spring mieans in one of said block'means adapted to intercept said shoulder means w ithin e ach oi. said apertures. 8. A peg toy uzzle comprising in eombination a plu rality of independently pivotal blocks mounted in stac keil relation-for rotation about a common axis and having a plurality of spaced aligned apertures which are aligned when the blocks are -pivoted to one relative position about a m on'axis t east one apertureof one of the blocks being misaligned with an.. aperture of another 151601: Wheii t11e 1oks are pivoted t any ther position, peg means insertable into the apertures when the blocks are pivoted to the same one relative position, and

'stop means for preventing th eomplete withdiawal of the peg means from all of the apertures, said stop means com-prising cooperative shoulder means 011 th'e peg means and pin means mounted on one of said blck means and adapted to project within said aprtures to abut against said shoulder means;

References Cited in the fi1e of t1ns pahiif UNITED STATES PATENTS Jackson Sept. 27, 1904 Burbank Sept. 2, 1913 Glass July 28, 1953 Derrig Aug. 2, 1955

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US771072 *Jul 8, 1904Sep 27, 1904Eliot Gregory JacksonPuzzle.
US1071874 *Dec 13, 1912Sep 2, 1913 Puzzle.
US2646646 *Jul 16, 1951Jul 28, 1953Glass Marvin IHammer toy
US2714511 *Sep 30, 1952Aug 2, 1955Rocco SindoniMaze puzzle
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3375009 *Sep 16, 1965Mar 26, 1968Kohner Bros IncPeg leveling game
US3532343 *Jan 3, 1969Oct 6, 1970Eggers Carter JSimulated lock game
US3601403 *Jan 12, 1970Aug 24, 1971Joseph A WeisbeckerSlide game
US3895808 *Mar 7, 1974Jul 22, 1975Raymond Lee Organization IncSelecting device
US4535993 *May 31, 1984Aug 20, 1985John TopitsPush peg game apparatus
US5035430 *Jan 9, 1990Jul 30, 1991Toybox CorporationPush pin puzzle with internal locking mechanism
US5092591 *Jul 9, 1990Mar 3, 1992Tol John HTherapeutical game apparatus
US5145177 *Nov 15, 1991Sep 8, 1992Wells Loren BStacking piece puzzle
US8651487 *Mar 24, 2011Feb 18, 2014Mark J. HolmesPush button puzzle with internal locking mechanism
US20110266749 *Mar 24, 2011Nov 3, 2011Holmes Mark JPush button puzzle with internal locking mechanism
WO1982003563A1 *Apr 15, 1982Oct 28, 1982Hans MartinToy comprised of a plurality of parts to be arranged in a certain way
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/153.00R, 446/118
International ClassificationA63F9/06, A63F9/12
Cooperative ClassificationA63F2009/1292, A63F2009/1264, A63F9/12
European ClassificationA63F9/12