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Publication numberUS2906276 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 29, 1959
Filing dateMar 8, 1956
Priority dateMar 8, 1956
Publication numberUS 2906276 A, US 2906276A, US-A-2906276, US2906276 A, US2906276A
InventorsBlanchette Albert G, Ristvedt Victor G
Original AssigneeBrandt Automatic Cashier Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coin sorter
US 2906276 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 29, 1959 A. e. BLANCHETTE ET AL I COIN SORTER Filed March 8, 1956 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTORS um '94. RM

COIN SORTER Albert G. Blanchette and Victor G. Ristvedt, Murfresboro, Tenn., assignors to Brandt Automatic Cashier Company, Watertown, Wis., a corporation of Wisconsin Application March 8, 1956, Serial No. 570,306

9 Claims. (Cl. 133-3) The invention relates to coin sorting machines.

The main object of the invention is to provide a coin sorting machine in which coins on a movable carrier are sorted while proceedingin single file past a series of selectively positioned means, one for each denomination of coin, said means cooperating with the energy imparted to the coins by the carrier to sortably receive the coins from said carrier. Preferably the carrier is a rotating disc along which the coins are moved by centrifugal force into a single line sorting position. The invention permits the sorting of coins at a very high rate of speed and considerably faster than heretofore.

A further object of the invention is to provide a coin sorting machine in which the coins, in single file, are carried around on the peripheral or outer portion of the surface of a rotating disc and are denominationally selectively removed from the disc by a series of pickups or plows which acting in conjunction with the kinetic energy imparted to the coins by the rotating disc force the coins upward, outward and off the disc into separate chutes.

A further object of the invention is to provide a coin sorting machine having a hopper to receive the coins to be sorted in which the rotating disc, above referred to, forms the bottom of the hopper. Under the action of centrifugal forces imparted to the coins by the disc, they are carried outwardly and under a plate spaced from the disc a distance great enough to allow the thickest coin to pass beneath the plate but less than the thickness of two of the thinnest coins and are then guided outwardly I by guide means associatedwith the plate in a single file to the peripheral portion of the disc.

A further object of the invention is to provide a coin sorting machine having a rotating disc, forming the bottom of a hopper to receive the coins to be sorted, acting in conjunction with a gauge plate to carry the coins outwardly of the hopper by centrifugal force, the hopper bottom portion of said disc having a facing of yieldable material to prevent jamming of the coins between the plate and the disc should superimposed coins try to pass between the disc and said plate.

A further object of the invention is to provide a coin sorting machine in which only one moving part, a rotating disc, carries the coins from a receiving hopper to a sorting station under the action of centrifugal force imparted to the coins and then by the further action of energy imparted to the coins by the disc acts in conjunction with denominationally selective means to sort the coins.

The application is a continuation in part of our application filed June 13, 1955, Serial No. 514,841 for Device for the Purpose of Sorting Coins, now abandoned. I

The invention further consists in the several features hereinafter set forth and more particularly defined by claims at the conclusion hereof.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a side elevation view of a coin sorter embQdying the invention;

Fig. 2 is a top plan view of the sorter; 1

Fig. 3 is a top view with the hopper and rt's support removed, parts being broken away; I

Fig. 4 is a detailed vertical sectional view taken an the broken line 4-4 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a detailed vertical sectional view taken on the line 5-5 of Fig. 3; I

Fig. 6 is a vertical sectional view through a section of the hopper showing the normal feed of the coins there= from; I i p 7 is a 308 off place view of a coin pickup; I

Fig. 8 is a view similar to Fig. 6 showing the action of two coins on the bottom plate of the hopper; and

Fig. 9 is a view similar to Fig. 8 showing the release of the two coins effected by the action shown in Fig. 8.

Referring to Fig. 4, the sorter includes a housing 10 having an electric motor M mounted on its side wall, the motor being of the geared down type and carrying a pulley 11.

The rotary shaft 12 is mounted in a bearing 13 in the top wall of the housing and in an outboard bearing 14 carried by a spider 15 secured to said wall. Shaft 12 has a pulley 16 mounted thereon and connected by a belt 17 with the pulley 11.

.A plate member 18 having a central opening 19 is mounted on the top wall of the housing 10 together with an associated cover plate member 18a as indicated in Fig. 3, these parts forming in effect a single plate. A

conical metal tube, forming a hopper 20, at its bottom surrounds the opening 19 and is held in operative position by a cover member 21 secured by screws 22 to the housing. A spiral guide 23 is attached to the underside of the plate member 18, a portion of which extends around opening 19 as shown in Fig. 3.

A disc 24 is mounted on the shaft 12 to rotate therewith within a recess 25 formed in the housing. The disc has a flat surface 26 extending to a rim or shoulder 27 and which surface below and adjacent the opening 19 is formed of a rubber section or pad 28 inset in the disc. The guide 23 projects down close to the fiat surface of the disc. The disc is provided with a series of radially spaced annular grooves 29, one for each denomination of coin to be, sorted. These grooves are radially spaced from the rim 27 so that the groove nearest the rim is overlapped by a dime D resting on the surface 26, the next groove is overlapped by a penny P on said surface, the next groove is overlapped by a nickel N on said surface, the next groove is overlapped by a quarter Q on said surface and the last groove is overlapped by a half dollar H. The disc is rotated in a clockwise direction by the motor M.

A section 30 of the plate member 18 is cut out as far pickup also has an inclined coin deflector portion 33 so formed and positioned relative to the disc 24 and parts of the housing that it will act to deliver or direct the coin it picks up into a delivery chute 34, see Figs. 1 and 5. The upper ends of the chute 34 are formed by portions of the housing or parts secured thereto and by plates '35 that are substantially tangentially disposed relative to grooves 29, see Figs. 3 and 5. There is one pickup for I each denomination of coin to be sorted working in its associated groove 29 and a chute 34 for each denomina tion of sorted coin. While not shown, usually the delivery chutes lead to a suitablereceptacle or to a bag to receive the sorted coins.

With the above construction, .coins are fed into the hopper 20 by the operator or in any other suita b1e mam,

ner and are deposited on the rubber section 28 of the rotating disc 24 and are forced outwardly along the surface of this disc by centrifugal force. The layer of coins on the disc 24 is sheared away from the mass of coins by the outward movement of the bottom layer of the coins into the slot or space 36 formed between the disc and the plate 18 as indicated in Fig. 6. Should, however, a pair of superimposed coins, as shown in Fig. 8, tend to jam in the slot 36 the yieldability of thesection 28 in most instances prevents actual jamming and permits the coins to rearrange themselves, as shown in Fig. 9, so that the thinner top coins can proceed into the space 36. The coins thus taken from the bottom of the'hopper are carried out by centrifugal force through the space 36 toward the outer portion of the disc until they strike the spiral guide 23 and are then carried along this guide until -in single file they leave the guide and move out, as shown in Fig. 3, until they strike the rim 27. Abutting the rim the coins are carried around in single file until they reach the region of the pickups or plows 31. When they reach the pickups, which are set at a tangent to the annular line of rotation of the disc, they are selectively removed by these pickups depending upon their diametrical dimensions which are also determinative'of their denominational value. A coin of a particular denominational value is separated from the remainderof the file of coins by the fact that the pickup working in its associated groove plows itself under the outer edge of the coin on the rim 27 as shown in Fig. 5, tilts the coin upwardly and then, under the action of kinetic energy imparted to the coin by the moving disc the coin moves itself in a more or less tangential path laterally outwardly of the disc and along the inclined guide surface of the portion 33, as indicated in Fig. 7, so that the coin is deflected into its proper delivery chute 34. The pickups are so arranged that the pickup for the largest diameter coin the half-dollar, will be given the first'chance to separate or sort such a coin andthe other pickups are sequentially arranged from the larger to the smaller coins so that the last pickup separates the smallest coins 'or dimes. The pickups, from the larger to the smallenare so elevated progressively as to permit the smaller diameter coins to pass under them and continue to the next smaller diameter pickup and then, as the case may be, proceed to other pickups until that pickup is reached which is gauged for its diameter whereupon the coin is lifted off the disc and is then tipped or raised off the shoulder or rim 27 and deflected outwardly into its delivery chute 34, as above described.

It is to be noted that the sortingfeature, while shown in connection with the hopper feed above described, is'of value per se.

By the term coins as used in the claims we mean to include the customary variations thereof such as tokens.

While the rim portions 27 are shown as integral with the disc, variations having an effect similar to the rim are within the contemplated scope'of the invention which is not to be limited to the details of construction herein shown and described unless said limitations are included in the appended claims.

We claim:

1. In a denominational value coin sorting machine the combination of a hopper, a rotary coin carrying disc having a top surface on which coins are free-to move and forming the-bottom of the hopper and extending beyond'the same, plate means spaced from the disc'adjacent the bottom of the hopper to permita single'layer of coins of any denomination to be carried centrifugally outwardly on said surface from the hopper to the peripheral portion of the disc, guide 'means for directing the coins from the hopper to the peripheral portion of said disc in a single file, peripheral limit means for limiting the outward travel of coins on'the disc in singlefile and coin-lifting means, one for 'each denomination of coma-selectively positioned spaced-relative'to said single 4 file'of coins and said peripheral limit means to sortably remove the coins from the disc while in a single file on the disc, in accordance with their denominational value.

2. In a coin sorting machine, the combination of a rotary disc having a top surface on which coins are free to move outwardly by centrifugal force imparted to them by said disc and for carrying coins to be sorted in a single file through a sorting station, a rim on saiddisc for limiting the outward travel of coins on said disc in their single file movement through said sorting station to a. common line of registry for the outer edges of said coins, and a series of coin-lifting means, one for each diametrical size of coin selectively spaced from said rim, at said sorting station cooperating with parts of said disc, said outward travel limiting means and the energy imparted to the coins by said disc to sortably remove the coins therefrom.

3. In a coin sorting machine, the combination of a rotary diSc having a top surface on which coins are free to move outwardly by centrifugal force imparted to them by said disc and on said surface in a single file through a sorting station, annular stop means on the peripheral portion of said disc for limiting the outward travel of the outer edges of the coins thereon in their single file movement through said sorting station to common line of registry, a series of pick ups at said station, one for I each diametrical size of coin and selectively spaced relative to said common line of registry and cooperating with said stop means and the energy imparted to the coins by said disc to sortably remove the coins directly outwardly 'therefrom, parts of said disc having continuous spaced annular grooves to permit the disposal of the forward ends of said pick ups beneath the coins on said disc.

'4. In a coin sorting machine, the combination of a rotary disc having a top surface on which coins are free to move outwardly by centrifugal force imparted tothem by said disc and on which coins are carried in a single file past a sorting station, peripheral stop means projecting above the top surface of the disc and engageable with an edge of each coin for limiting the outward travel of coins on said disc in their single file movement through said sorting station, and a series of fixed pick ups, one for each diametrical size of coin selectively spaced relative to said peripheral stop means, each pick up'tangentially disposed and inclined outwardly relative to the circumferential path of said disc at said sorting station cooperating with parts of said disc, said outward travel limiting means and the energy imparted by the disc to the coins to lift and guide the sorted coins directly upwardly and outwardly from the peripheral portion of said disc.

5. In a coin sorter for sorting coins'of a plurality of different diametrical sizes into groups of similar size coins, the combination of a rotary disc having a top surface on which coins are free to move and adapted to carry the coins to be sorted outwardly along said surface by centrifugal force, means cooperating with said disc to form a singlefile of the coins on the outer portion of said disc, past a sorting station, common peripheral limit means for said single file of coins at said station, and fixed coin lifting means, one for each diametrical size of coin, selectively spaced relative to the outer edges of said single file of coins and said peripheral limit means and cooperating with parts of said disc, said peripheral limit means and kinetic energy imparted to the .coins by said disc to sortably project the coins directly outwardly'of the peripheral portion of the disc.

6. In a denominational coin sorting machine the combination of a hopper, a'rotary coin carrying disc having a top surface on which coins are free to move and form- 'ing the bottom of the hopper and extending beyond the same and spaced from the body thereof a distance to permit a layer of coins of any denomination to be carried centrifugally outwardly from the hopper on said surface toward the peripheral portion of the disc, spirally formed guide means for directing said single layer of coins to the peripheral portion of said disc in a single file, that portion of the disc beneath the outlet from said hopper being yieldable to prevent the jamming of a pair of superimposed coins, peripheral limit means for said single file of coins, and coin-lifting means, one for each denomination of coin, selectively spaced relative to said single file of coins and said peripheral limit means to sortably remove the coins from the disc in accordance with their denominational value as they move in single file thereon.

7. In a denominational coin sorting machine, the combination of a movable carrier having a top surface on which coins are carried and are free to move in a single file path, means for keeping the outer edges of the coins in their single file path in a common line of registry and providing a fulcrum point for each coin at its outer edge, and a series of coin lifting means, one for each denomination of coins selectively positioned relative to said line of registry and operable on the coins in said path in cooperative relation with the energy imparted to the coins by said carrier to tip said coins about said fulcrum points in a direction outwardly of said carrier to sortably remove the coins from said carrier.

8. In a machine for sorting coins of different diametrical sizes into groups of similar size coins, the combination of a rotary disc having a top surface on which coins are free to move outwardly by centrifugal force imparted to them by the disc and in a single file through a sorting station, a rim on said disc for limiting the outward travel of the outer edges of the coins on said disc in their single file movement through said sorting station to a common line of registry, a series of pickups at said station, one for each diametrical size coin and selectively spaced relative to said rim and cooperating with said rim and the energy imparted to the coins by said disc to sortably remove the coins directly outwardly from the surface of said disc, parts of the surface of said disc being recessed to permit disposal of the forward ends of the pickups beneath the coins on said disc.

9. In a machine for sorting coins of different diametrical sizes into groups of similar size coins, the combination of a rotary disc having a top surface on which coins are free to move outwardly by centrifugal force imparted to them by the disc, means limiting the supply of coins to the central portion of said disc, means controlling the feed of coins from the central portion of the disc as a single layer of coins, guide means for limiting the initial movement of the coins on said disc to an area back from the outer portion of said disc and directing coins from this area to the outer portion of the surface of the disc to form a single file of coins thereon, rim means engageable with an edge of each of said single file of coins for limiting the outward travel of the coins on the outer portion of the disc and providing a fulcrum point for the outer edge of each coin, and a series of coin lifting means, one for each diametrical size of coin selectively spaced relative to said rim means to act on said single file of coins in conjunction with said rim means and the kinetic energy imparted to the coins by said disc to sortably project the coins directly outwardly and away from the disc.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 229,712 Junkin July 6, 1880 1,200,843 Johnson et a1 Oct. 10, 1916 1,279,351, Jorgensen et al Sept. 17, 1918 1,813,296 Kidwell July 7, 1931 1,965,373 FitzGerald July 3, 1934 1,979,659 Zierick Nov. 6, 1934 2,519,357 Daugherty Aug. 22, 1950 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No, 2,906,276 September 29, 1959 Albert G. Blanchette et a1.

It is hereby certified that error appears in the -printed specification of the above numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as corrected below.

Column 4, lines 51 and 52, strike out "directly" and insert the same before "outwardly" in line 52, same column.

Signed and sealed this 19th day of April 1960.,

(SEAL) Attest:

KARL Ho LINE ROBERT c. WATSON Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2987160 *Dec 9, 1957Jun 6, 1961by mesne assignmentsAgitator for coin handling apparatus and the like
US3227363 *Oct 19, 1962Jan 4, 1966Anker Werke AgCoin sorting apparatus
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EP0707733A1 *Jun 27, 1994Apr 24, 1996Cummins-Allison CorporationDisc coin sorter with improved exit channel
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Classifications
U.S. Classification453/6
International ClassificationG07D3/00, G07D3/12
Cooperative ClassificationG07D3/128
European ClassificationG07D3/12D