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Publication numberUS2909874 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 27, 1959
Filing dateAug 27, 1957
Priority dateAug 27, 1957
Publication numberUS 2909874 A, US 2909874A, US-A-2909874, US2909874 A, US2909874A
InventorsCharles L Barr
Original AssigneeRedington Co F B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Packaging machine
US 2909874 A
Abstract  available in
Images(9)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 27, 1959 c. L. BARR 2,909,874

- PACKAGING MACHINE Filed Aug. 27. 1957 v 9 sheets-sheet 1 Oct. 27, 1959 c. L. BARR PACKAGING MACHINE Filed Aug. 27, 1957 9 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR: CHARLES l.. BARR ATT'Ys Oct V27 1959 c. L. BARR 2,909,874

PACKAGING MACHINE Filed Aug. 27, 1957 9 sheets-sheet s INVENTORI CHARLES l BARR ATTYs Oct- 27, 1959 c. L. BARR 2,909,874

PACKAGING MACHINE Filed Aug. 27,. 1957 9 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR:

ATT'YS Oct. 27, 1959 c. L. BARR PACKAGING MACHINE 9 sheets-smeet 5 Filed Aug. 27, 1957 1111,/ lll/l l/ N5 2N EN INVENTOR.'

CHARLES l.. BARR BY fz/v/y/nazj ATT'YS l mm.

Oct. 27, 1959 c. L. BARR PACKAGING MACHINE Filed Aug. 27, 1957 9 Sheets-Sheet 6 INVENTOR; l CHARLES L.- BARR ATTYs C. L. BARR PACKAGING MACHINE 9 sheets-sheet fr FIG. I4

L JNVENTOR.' CHARLES L. BARR ATT'YS Oct. 27, 1959 f Filed Aug. 27, 1957 Oct. 27, 1959 c. L. BARR PACKAGING MACHINE Filed Aug. 27,4 1957 9 Sheets-Sheet 8 O w 2 w 5 mm H G m. H F F lOl S .BARR

ATT'Ys Oct. 27, 1959 c. L. BARR PACKAGING MACHINE 9 Sheets-Sheet 9 Filed Aug. 27, 1957 CHARLES L. BARR BY ATTYs United States Patent() PACKAGING MACHINE Charles L. Barr, Glen Ellyn, lll., assignor to F. B. Redington Co., Bellwood, Ill., a corporation of Delaware Application August 27, 1957, Serial No. 680,446

' 18 Claims. (Cl. 5375) This invention relates to a machine for packaging articles of merchandise within Cartons.

The packaging machine of the present invention comprises a step-by-step driven conveyer having a plurality of spaced pockets each adapted to receive a carton in an expanded or erected condition. At the head end of the conveyer, a magazine and an expanding device is arranged so that the cartonsare taken one at a time in flattened condition from the magazine, expanded and deposited into a pocket of the conveyer while the conveyer is at rest. Laterally adjacent the conveyer and also at the head end thereof is a filling mechanism which includes a plurality of article receiving chutes and reciprocable 2,909,874 Patented Oct. V27, 1959 ice -Other objects, features,

pusher means for transferring articles from the chutes to the empty cartons aligned therewith. After the articles have'been properly inserted into the empty cartons, the pusher means operates a switch means for causing the machine to go through a cycle of operation thereby advancing the filled cartons and bringing empty cartons into alignment with the end of the chutes. Front and rear tucking assemblies are arranged along the conveyer for closing the ends of the cartons as they are advanced theref along by the conveyer, and an ejector is mounted near the tail end of the conveyer to eject the filled and closed cartons from the pockets onto a laterally adjacent supporting table. From the supporting table, the lled cartons are discharged from the machine and into receptacles or onto another adjacent table. The various parts of the machine are arranged for ease of adjustability so that cartons of various sizes may be accommodated by the machine thereby permitting a small packaging concern to utilize a single machine for several packaging operations.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide a packaging machine for cartoning articles of merchandise wherein the machine is adjustable to accommodate cartons of various sizes.

Another object of this invention resides in the provision of a packaging machine capable of cartoning articles of merchandise, wherein the machine is economically and simply constructed and portable to the extent that it may be moved from one location to another location.

Still another object of this invention is in the provision of a packaging machine capable of expanding cartons from a flattened condition, filling the cartons, and closing the cartons thereby completely packaging articles of merchandise.

A further object of this invention is to provide a packaging machine, wherein the loading of articles of merchandise into cartons held by a pocketed conveyer effects a cycling operation of the machine to deposit empty cartons into certain conveyer pockets, advance the filled cartons away from the filling mechanism and bring empty cartons to the filling mechanism, and to close the ends of the cartons.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a packaging machine having a manually operable filling ure, Vtaken in conjunction with the accompanying sheets of drawings, wherein like referencenumerals refer to like parts, in which:

. Fig. 1 is a front perspective view of a packaging ma.v some parts `broken chinel embodying the invention, with away for purposes of clarity;

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of a sample carton suit-v able for use with the present invention; Fig. 3 is a diagrammatic-view showing the moving compon'entsl and the driving connections therebetween of the machine with various parts omitted for purposes'of clarity; Fig. 4 is a front perspectiveview ofgthe front tucking and closing assembly for closing the front endA of. the carton; Fig. 5 is a perspective view of the rearl tucking and closing assemblyfor closing the rear of the carton; Fig. 6 is an enlarged sectional view taken substantially along line 6-6 of Fig. 4; Fig. 7 is a greatly enlarged detail view of the tuck flap breaker ofthe rear tucking assembly; Fig. 8 is an enlarged perspective view of the tuck flap guide plate of the rear tucking and closing assembly; Fig. 9 is a detailed perspective view of the tuck ap tucking barof the rear tucking and closing assembly;

Fig. 10 is an enlarged transverse sectional view taken through the machine and illustrating the front yand rear tuck flap tucking bars and related parts;

Fig. 11 is a detailed side elevational view of the rear tuck flap breaker;

Fig. 12 is an enlarged front perspective view :of the filling mechanism; 1 v i Fig. 12A is an enlarged front perspective View of a modified filling mechanism having a power-driven pusher;

Fig. 13 is an enlarged fragmentary perspective view of a part of the pocket conveyer of the machine;

Fig. 14 is an enlarged front elevational view of the carton magazine and the carton expanding device shown in association with the head end of the conveyer;

Figs. 15, 16, 17 and 18 are more or less diagrammatic views illustrating the sequence of operation for'actuating the cycling start switch during operation of the reciprocable pusher means on the filling mechanism;

Fig. 19 is a schematic diagram of the electrical circuit for operating the machine; f y Fig. 20 is an enlarged perspective view, partially'. fragmentary, of the head end of the machine and the pocket extender; and

Fig. 21 is a detailed perspective view of the actuating lever on the pocketextender looking atV the side mounting l the cam.

i ing the entire machine from one place to another. A conmechanism whereupon operation of the filling mechanism, A

the machine goes through a cycle of operation including the advancing of the cartons adjacent to the filling mechanism and removal of the filled cartons from the area of the filling mechanism and closing of the ends of the cartons. I i

veyor, generally designated by the numeral 15, extends longitudinally of the machine and is provided with a plurality of spaced pockets or buckets 16 adapted to receive expanded or erected cartons and'carry them along .the machine. At the head end of the conveyer, a magazine 17 supports astack of cartons in flattened condition; and an expanding device 18 takes the cartons one at a time from the magazine, expandsl the cartons and n deposits them into a pocket 16 of the conveyer. Y A filling.:

and advantages of the invenfI mechanism is arranged laterally adjacent the conveyer at `the head end thereof and includes a plurality of article receiving chutes 19 and a reciprocable pusher 20 which serves to transfer articles from the chutes into cartons aligned therewith in the conveyer pockets. As the conveyer advances the cartons along the machine, a front tucking and closing assembly 21 and a rear tucking and closing assembly 22 closes the opposite ends of the cartons. The entire rear tucking and closing assembly is adjustably movable toward and away from the front assembly 21 to accommodate cartons of varying lengths. At the tail end of the conveyer 15, an ejector 23 ejects the filled and closed cartons from the conveyer pockets and onto a transfer or discharge table 24. A rotary transfer wheel 25 advances the cartons along the table 24 to make room for the subsequent or successively ejected cartons. For purposes of clarity, the actual supporting members for many of the operating components are not shown, but it will be understood that a suitable framework is provided for supporting the various operating cornponents of the machine in cooperative relationship.

The conveyer is effectively a chain conveyer and comprises a plurality of sets of parallel bars 26 and 27 connected together by chain links 28, Figs. 3 and 13, to form an endless conveyer. Each bar 26 is longitudinally slotted at 29 and has upstanding from one end a pocket forming plate 30 extending transverselv to the longitudinal axis thereof. Parallel opposed to the pocket forming plate 30 is a second pocket forming plate 31 upstanding 'and adjustably mounted on the bar 26 by means of the nut and bolt assembly 32 which extends through the slot 29 and permits the plate 31 to be adjusted along the bar 26 to thereby accommodate cartons of varying widths or sizes. The chain conveyer 15 is trained over a guide plate 33 having an arcuate guide surface 34 at one end of the machine and over a drive sprocket 35 at the other end of the machine, Fig. 3. The guide plate 33, will, of course, be mounted on a rigid part of the machine framework, while the drive sprocket 35 is mounted on a drive shaft 36 rotatably supported in suitable bearings. The drive shaft 36 is driven step-by-step by the Geneva movement 37 which includes a driven wheel 38 connected to the drive shaft 36 and a driver 39 connected to a power shaft 40. When the machine is in operation, the power shaft 40 is operating continuously and driven by an electric motor 41 through a reducing gear assembly 42, a sprocket 43 mounted on the output shaft of the reducing gear assembly, and an endless chain or power transmission member 44 trained over the sprocket 43 and a sprocket 45 mounted on the power shaft 40. Thus, during operation of the motor 41, the power shaft 40 is driven continuously, while through the Geneva movement 37, the drive shaft 36 and the conveyer 15 is driven step-bystep. Also mounted on the drive shaft 36 for step-by-step movement is the rotary transfer wheel 25 which includes a pair of hubs 46 mounting a plurality of radial arms 47 which protrude through suitable slots or openings 48 in the transfer table 24, Fig. l. Other movable components of the machine are driven from the power shaft 40 as will become more evident hereinafter.

The cartons are initially fed from the magazine 17 which includes a rear guide plate or wall 49 supported by the framework of the machine by a supporting bar 50, and a front adjustably mounted guide plate or wall 51, Fig. 14. These walls are parallel to each other and incline rearwardly from the vertical to support a stack of cartons in flattened condition along an inclined plane. As seen most clearly in Fig. l, the front wall S1 is supported from the rear wall 49 by a framework including a laterally extending rear bar 52 connected at one end to the rear wall 59 and at the other end to a forwardly extending side support bar 53. Extending inwardly from the outer end of the bar 53 and parallel to the bar 52 is a forward bar 54, the free end of which has adjustably clamped thereto a supporting leg 55 connected to the front wall 51 by a clamp 56. A third upstanding guide plate or side wall 57 is secured to a supporting leg 58 which is adjustably clamped to the bar 53 by a clamp 59. This side wall 57 engages the rear ends of the attened cartons and is perpendicularly positioned relative to the front and rear walls 51 and 49. Thus, any size of carton may be accommodated by the adjustable magazine 17.

As seen most clearly in Fig. 14, a pair of forwardly extending ledges or projections 60 are provided at the bottom edge of the rear wall 49 for engaging the rear edges of the lowermost carton within the magazine. The front edges of the lowermost carton in the magazine are supported on a ledge 61 formed at the upper end of an eX- pander block or plate 62.

The expander block 62 is angularly related to the forward wall 51 and extends downwardly and rearwardly toward the rear wall, as seen most clearly in Fig. 14. A notch 63 is formed at the lower end of the forward wall 51 to receive the upper edge of the expander block 62. An angularly shaped brace 64 is suitably secured to the expander block 62 and provided with a set screw 65 at the other end for adjusting the inclination of the expander block 62 by having the inner end of the set screw bearing against the outer face of the front wall 51. A spring 66 maintains the expander block 62 in position and the set screw 65 in bearing engagement against the outer face of the front wall 51.

Because the magazine is inclined from the vertical in a manner as seen in the drawings, the center of gravity of a stack of cartons held by the magazine is displaced rearwardly so that the weight of the cartons is also shifted rearwardly and generally against the rear Wall 49 and the inwardly extending ledges 60 at the lower end thereof. This relieves the pressure at the front or forward edges of the cartons thereby permitting only the front edge of each carton to engage the expanding block and consequently avoid marking of the front panel of each carton during the expanding operation. Further, since pressure at the front end of the carton is now relieved by inclining rthe magazine, it is not necessary to employ a carton clamp for holding the main portion of the stack of cartons when removing a carton from the magazine.

For the purpose of expanding the cartons from the flattened condition and depositing them into a pocket 16 of the conveyer 15, a pair of suction heads 67 grip the underside of the lowermost carton in the magazine in the manner as seen Iin Fig. 14, and move downwardly thereby expanding the carton against the expanding block 62 and consequently depositing the expanded carton into the pocket 16 aligned therewith while the conveyor is at rest. Each suction head 67 is adjustably carried on the end of substantially right angle supporting members 68, each of which is connected to a transversely extending support bar 69, Figs. 3 and 14. For reciprocating the suction heads, the support bar 69 is connected at its upper end to a hollow slide rod 70 slidably received in a block 71 pivotally carried on the end of a right angle bolt 72, the latter being rigidly secured to a longitudinal support 73 of the machine framework. One Vend of an actuating lever 74 is pivotally connected to the lower end of the slide rod 70, while the other end of the lever is freely supported on a stationary supporting shaft 75. A second lever 76 is pivotally mounted on the shaft 75 but spaced from the first lever 74 and angularly displaced therefrom substantially Between the levers 74 and 76, a connecting arm 77, Fig. 3, serves to connect these levers together so that they oscillate together. One end of a reciprocating rod 78 is pivotally connected to the free end of link 76 and also pivotally connected at its other end to one end of a rotating arm 79. The other end of the rotating arm is rigidly secured to the continually rotating power shaft 40 so that upon operation of the power shaft 40 the arm 79 rotates through 360 to impart a reciprocatory motion to the rod 78 and an oscillating motion to the links or levers l74 and 76 thereby imparting a substantially vertical reciprocatory motion to the slide rod 70 and suction heads 67. As the suction heads move downwardly, they expand a ca rton against the expander block and deposit it into a pocket of the con- 'veyer 15.

The suction at the suction heads 57 is Agenerated by a motor and pump unit 80, Fig. 3, which is connected to the hollow slide rod 70 by a flexible Iline y81. As seen in Figs. 3 and 14, a suction exhaust valve 82 is mounted at the top of the hollow slide rod 70 and connected to the suction heads 67 by flexible lines 8,3. This suction exhaust valve 82 includes an angularly shaped fiapper plate 84 resiliently biased over an aperture on the top of the Valve 82 by a spring 8.5. The aperture leads to the hollow of the slide rod 70. The flapper plate 84 is movable to a position to allow the valve 82 to exhaust and thereby break the suction to the suction heads when the outer end of the plate 84 is cammed upwardly against the upper free end of a carnming bar 86 secured to the pivotal slide block 71. Thus, when the expanded carton has been properly deposited in an aligned conveyer pocket 16, downward movement of the slide rod 70 brings the flapper plate 84 into engagement with the camming bar 86 to break the suction to the suction heads and permit the further downward movement of the now non-operative suction heads prior to advancing the conveyer to the next position.

Each article receiving chute 19 of the filling mechanism may be adjusted to accommodate articles of varying size, and each chute includes an upstanding stationary wall or guide 88 movable over the bottom 89 of the chute, Figs. 12 and 12A. All of the adjustable walls 88 are connected to a common bar 90 so that the adjustable walls may be moved in unison. The reciprocable pusher 20 includes pusher members 91, one arranged in each chute, and is provided with a roller 92 at one end slidably supported in an elongated slot or guideway 93 of a stationary support 93a 'rigidly supported by the machine frame, and at the other end with a hollow cylindrical guide 94 slidable on an elongated guide rod 95. A handle 96 is secured to the pusher for manually reciprocating it along its rectilinearly guided path, as seen most clearly in Fig. 12. While the reciprocable pusher 20 is preferably manuallyoperated, it will be Yappreciated that it may be power operated such as by a double acting hydraulic cylinder 97 as seen in the modified arrangement of Fig. 12A.

Moreover, any other type of filling mechanism may be employed such as a completely automatic arrangement. For example, the articles may be brought to the conveyer pockets by an endless belt conveyer and transferred to cartons in the pockets by areciprocating conveyer which could be actuated in response to an article positioning switch.

At the handle end of the pusher 20, a plate 98 pivotally carries an actuating bar 99, Figs. 1 and 15-18, which is generally free to rotate clockwise. but prevented from rotating counter-clockwise past the stop 100. Extending laterally and outwardly from the `.actuating bar 99 and at the end opposite from that which engages the stop 100 is a pin 101 which is arrangedv to engage a roller 102 mounted on the end of an arm 103 of a normally open cycling start or filler switch 104.. Preferably, the start switch is of the microswitch type although any other type may be employed. During the loading or filling of the cartons aligned with the inner ends of the chutes 19 by advancing the pusher 20 toward the conveyer 15, the pin 101 hits the roller 102 and thereby causes the actuating bar 99 to rotate clockwise to an inclined non-operating position such as seen in Fig. 16 and thereby move the pin 101 of the actuating bar 99 out of the path of the roller 102 of the switch 104 without operating the switch. As the pusher is advanced forwardly to move the articles into the cartons in the conveyer and the plate 98 also advances forwardly, and as seen in Fig. 17, the upper forward edge of the actuating bar 99 engages a stationary reset bar 105 which operates to pivot the actuating bar in a counterclockwise direction to a vertical position against the stop 100. The actuating bar 99, being in this position as seen in Fig. 17, positions the pin 101 so that when the pusher 20 is retracted away from the conveyer, the pin 101 will be in the path of the roller 102 of the cycling start switch 104 to close this normally open switch and initiate a cycling operation of the machine. This cycling operation includes step-by-step advancement of the conveyer 15 to remove the filled cartons from alignment with the loading chutes and bring empty cartons into alignment with the loading chutes, as well as to control operation of the expander for expanding and depositing a carton into each pocket 16 of the conveyer as it is advanced past the magazine. Further, other operations will be effected on the cartons such as the tucking and closing of the carton ends and the ejecting of the filled and closed cartons fromV the discharge end of the conveyer to the transfer table 24.

In effecting the cycling operation, momentary closing of the normally open cycling start switch 104 energizes a control relay 106, Fig. 19, which, in turn, closes contacts 107, 108 and 109 to connect the motor 41 to a power source. Also, contacts 110 are closed which effectively serve as a hold circuit to hold the control relay 106 in energized position after the normally open cycling start switch has been released by movement of the pin 1 01 beyond the roller 102 to a position such as seen in Fig. l5. 'Overload devices 111 and 112 are provided in some of the power lines to the motor as a safety precaution againsty overloading of the motor 41. Should the loading chutes be jammed for any reason, the pusher 20 will not advance forward enough toward the conveyer whereby the actuating bar 99 will not be pivoted to the position shown in Fig. 17. Then retraction of the pusher 20 away from the conveyer with the bar 99 in inclined position, as seen in Fig. 16, will not effect starting of the cycling operation since the pin 101 will pass above the rollerp102 of the cycling start switch 104. This safety precaution precludes the possibility of jams in the machine which might be caused by inserting the articles of merchandise only part way within the cartons. The control relay 106 and its contacts on the overload devices may be enclosed within a control box 113 mounted on the frontwall 10 of the machine as seen in Fig. 1.

The cycling operation will be such as to advance the filled cartons from alignment with the loading chutes and advance empty cartons into alignment with the loading chutes and therefore comprise three step-by-step advances of the conveyer with respect to the present machine. However, it will be appreciated that more or less than three chutes may be employed on any one machine and that the cycling operation would be adjusted accordingly.

The driven wheel 38 of the Geneva movement 37 in the present machine is provided with six indexing positions, only three of which would be used in any one cycling operation of the machine. Stopping the machine after three step-by-step movements of the conveyer have been completed is accomplished by the normally closed cycling stop switch 114, Figs. 1, 3, and 19. This switch is mounted adjacent to the driven wheel 38 of the Geneva movement, .and is opened to deenergize the control relay 106 by an actuating bar 115 mounted on the outer'end of the power shaft 36, Figs. 1 and 3. The actuating bar extends transversely to the shaft 36, wherein one end of the bar functions to stop one cycling operation while the other end of the bar functions to stop the successive cycling operation. Thus, after the machine has completed one cycle of operation, it will automatically stop and be ready for the next filling operation. It may be noted that the cycling 4stop switch 114 is similar in construction to the start switch 104 in that it also includes a roller and arm arrangement wherein the roller is engaged by the actuatingv bar 115 to operate the switch.

Since there is occasion for operating the machine and advancing the conveyer without relying on the automatic cycling operation, a push button job switch 116 is provided, Figs. 1 and 19, which will operate the motor 41 for any desired interval of time. For example, in either setting up the machine or clearing away a jam in the machine, it may be desirable to have the conveyer advance slowly or the moving components of the machine to move a short distance, and in such situations the jog switch 116 bypasses the normally open ller switch 104 and operates the machine.

The tucking and closing assemblies 21 a Z2 herein disclosed are arranged to tuck and close a verse tuck flap carton such as the carton C as seen in Fig. 2. However, it may be readily appreciated that the rear tucking and closing assembly 22 may assimilate the front tucking and closing assembly 21 to permit the machine to use a straight tuck carton. Further, the tucking and closing assemblies may be designed to handle glued end cartons. The reverse tuck carton C includes side walls 117, top and bottom walls 118 and 119, front side tiaps 12% and 121, a front end panel 122, a front tuck flap 123, rear side aps 124 and 125, a rear end panel 126 and a rear tuck flap 127. The carton in its expanded condition will look exactly like it is shown in Fig. 2. The front end panel 122 and front tuck flap 123 are separated by a score line 128, while the rear end panel 126 and rear tuck iiap 127 are separated by a score line 129. The front and rear side flaps will extend straight out from the side walls, while the rear end panel and tuck flaps will extend straight out from the top and bottom walls. Thus, it is seen that it is necessary during the tucking and closing operations to close the side iiaps, break the tuck flaps against the end panels and close the end panels and tuck liaps so that the tuck ap is received between the side iiaps and the respective top and bottom walls of the cartons. This is accomplished by the front and rear tucking and closing assemblies 21 and 22.

The front tucking and closing assembly 21 includes an elongated carton hold-down plate 130 extending along the conveyer, Fig. 4, on the forward side of the conveyer pockets and which is mounted adjustably above the bottoms of the loading chutes 19 and the conveyer pocket bottoms. The cartons are further held in proper position in the pockets of the conveyer by a stationary bottom rail 13r coacting with the upper rail 130. The upper rail is adjusted so the carton its freely between the upper and lower rails. The discharge end of the plate 130 at the discharge end of the conveyer is mounted in spaced relationship above the framework by a vertical supporting bar 131, Fig. 1 and Fig. 4, which is clamped to a frame piece 131a by a clamp 131b, and the entire plate may be adjustably moved up and down to accommodate varying sizes of cartons. Similarly, the other end of the plate 130 is adjustably mounted on an upstanding frame piece 13051 by means of a clamp and bracket assembly 13017, Fig. 1.

The cartons are placed in the magazine so that when they are expanded the front end panel and front tuck ap 122 and 123 will extend forwardly of the conveyer pocket and the front tucking and closing assembly 21 will function to close this front tuck flap and end panel arrangement. As each carton C is advanced by the conveyer toward the front end of the elongated plate 130, the top wall of the carton will pass under the bottom edge of the plate 130 and the score iine between the top wall 118 and the front end panel 122 will be substantially directly underneath the plate 130. Thus, the carton will be held down at the front end by plate 130. A first plow or cam 132, suitably secured to the support plate 130, coacts with the fore end 133 of the plate 130 to receive the front end panel and front tuck tiap of the carton therebetween and fold it upwardly along the score line between the top wall and the front end panel until the front end panel and the front tuck flap are substantially at 90 to the top wall of the carton, as seen in Fig. 4.

Thus, the plow 132 effectively folds upwardly the front end panel and front tuck ap of the carton and the vertical plate 130 serves as a backing member against which the front end panel and front tuck ap may be urged. The front side aps and 121 will be permitted to be free thereby keeping them in an extending position away from the opposite side walls of the carton.

As the carton is advanced to the next position by the step-by-step conveyer which will put it in front of the next chute, the front end panel is received behind a breaker bar 134, while the tuck flap is urged outwardly from the plate by a plow or cam 135. The plow is also adjustably clamped to the frame piece 130:1 by a clamp and bracket assembly 135er, Fig. 1 and interconnected to the breaker bar 134. The upper edge of the breaker bar 134 is relatively thin and will lie directly along the score line 128 between the front tuck ap and the front end panel since it is necessary to fold over the tuck ap or break the tuck flap at this score line. Again, the bar or plate 130 serves to coact with the breaker bar 134 and hold the front end panel therebetween. At this position when the conveyer is at rest, a movable breaking bar 136 is brought vertically downwardly to engage behind the tuck flap and break it over the breaker bar 134 and thereby condition the tuck flap relative to the end panel for subsequent closing thereof. The breaking bar 136 is reciprocated upwardly and downwardly by the rotating arm 79 on the continuously driven shaft 40 through the reciprocating rod 78 and the lever 76, Fig. 3. The breaking bar 136 is connected to the upper end of a slide rod 137 which is loosely slidable in a bore formed in a part 138 of the framework. The lower end of the slide rod 137 is angularly bent at right angles thereto and pivotally received in the end of an arm 139, the other end of which is secured to the intermediate portion of the reciprocating lever 76.

Referring again to Fig. 4, the plow 135 is broadened at 140 so as to overlap the breaking bar 134 at the next station and thereby hold the tuck iap in folded position. This is the last station which aligns with the loading chute and so it will be appreciated that all of the cartons originally aligned with the loading chutes will be iilled so that when the carton leaves the station of this last chute it may then be closed up. To further crease `the tuck flap at the score line between the tuck flap and the end panel, a resiliently biased roller 141 is arranged at the end of the breaker bar 134 so that the folded tuck flap and its panel will be urged in folded position against the plate 130 as the carton passes this point. The roller 141 is mounted on a vertical shaft to rotate thereon and the shaft is carried by a supporting lever 142 pivotally supported at its other end to a xed part of the framework. A spring 143 serves to resiliently bias the roller and arm into position so that the tuck flap is held in folded position against the end panel. At the station beyond the last chute, a plow or guide 145 serves to fold in the leading side flap 121, while a rotating folder 146 folds in the `trailing side tiap 120 at the same time. Actually, the folder 146 operates while the conveyer is at rest and oscillates back and forth on an upstanding shaft 147 rotatably mounted in a part of the framework as seen in Fig. 3.

Referring particularly to Fig. 3, the bottom end of the shaft 147 is secured to a horizontally extending lever 148 which has a downwardly extending pin 149 attached to its free end, This pin is engaged by a roller 150 mounted on the end of a pivoting lever 151 which is secured to a cam operated arm 152 having a cam follower 153 mounted thereon. The arm 152 is right angularly shaped and rigidly mounted on a longitudinally extending shaft 154 bearingly carried by the framework of the machine. A spring 155 is secured at one end to the pin 149 and at the other end to the cam operated arm 152 to constantly bias the pin 149 against the roller 151i. A cam 156 is mounted on a longitudinally extending rotatable behind and clear of the bevel gear 158 so it can operate without hitting this gear.

Referring now again to Fig. 4, an extension 160 from the plow 145 maintains the side flaps in folded position during movement of the carton to the next successive station, while the front tuck flap and front end panel are released from the creasing roller 141 and engaged by a plow 161 and adjustably mounted on the plate 130 which folds the end panel downwardly to the position as seen in the next station preparatory to closing of the end panel and tuck flap of the carton.

Closing of the front end panel and inserting of the tuck flap between the side aps and the bottom wall of the carton is accomplished at the next station by the tucker bar 162 and the tuck ilap aligning plate 163. The mechanism for operating the tucker bar and the tuck llap aligning plate includes a linkage arrangement as seen in Figs. 3 and l0.

As seen most clearly in Figs. 3 and 10, the tucker bar 162 is connected to a U-shaped linkage arrangement i11- cluding connected bars 165, 166 and 167, the latter of which is secured to a shaft 168 pivotally mounted on a stationary plate `169 of the framework. Also secured to the shaft 168 is an actuating lever 170 which is oscillated by a roller 171 mounted on a link 172. 'Ihe link 172 is rigidly secured intermediate an upstanding support bar 173 which carries at its upper end the ejector 23 and is secured at its other end to the oscillating shaft 154. Thus, oscillation of the shaft 154 by the cam 156 oscillates the tucker bar 162 to perform the tucking operation.

In order to align the leading edge of the tuck llap 123 as it is inserted between the bottom Wall of the container and the front side aps, the aligning plates 163 moves upwardly and inwardly as the tucker bar 162 moves inwardly. The aligning plate 163 is pivoted at one end to a pin 174 carried on a supporting bar 175, Fig. 10. A longitudinally extending slot 176 is provided in the upper end of the supporting bar 175 for slidably engaging a pin 177 mounted on the rigid supporting plate 169. At the other end of the supporting bar 175, a second slot 178 slidably receives a pin 179 rigidly secured to the lower bar 167 which supports the tucker bar 162. The slot 178 is slightly angularly related to the longitudinal axis of the bar 175. A spring 180 is carried by the supporting bar 175 to resiliently bias the pin 179 toward the lower end of the slot 178 when the linkage is in operation. Preferably, the tucker bar 162 will be adjusted so that it will engage the front end panel 122 just above the score line between the front end panel and the front tuck flap 123. As the shaft 154 oscillates to actuate the tucker bar and aligning plate, when the pin 179 of the tucker bar supporting assemblage reaches the top of the slot.178, continued movement will cause the aligning plate 163 to move upwardly and inwardly toward the carton along the path of pin 177 and the slot 176. The aligning plate 163 will be arranged so that it will move upwardly a greater distance than the bottom wall of the carton, but the tucker bar 162 will engage the aligning plate and move it downwardly on the pivot 174 against the biasing of a spring 181. The tucker bar and aligning plate will only operate when the conveyer is at rest.

The rear tucking and closing assembly 22 opposes the front tucking and closing assembly 21 and is on the opposite side of the conveyer. During the tucking and closfis adjustably carried Von the framework of the rear asing operations on the front tuck ap and end panel, tucking and closing operations are also being performed on the rear tuck flap and end panel in a similar fashion but with slight changes inasmuch as the rear end panel and tuck flap are coextensive with the bottom of each carton.

parallel relation to the path of conveyer travel. .breaker bar is adjusted so that the outer sharp edge 195 -coaligns with the score line 129 extending between the Looking at Fig. 5, each carton moves from right to left, and as it is carried to the rst station opposite the rst loading chute, the leading rearY side flap is folded over by a plow or cam 182 adjustably secured to the fore end'of aglongitudinally extending vertical flap holding bar 183 which maintains the flaps in folded position during the travel along the machine. lAt this station the trailing rear side ilap `124 is also folded inwardly by a movable folder 184, while the rear tuck ap 127 and rear end vpanel 126 is supported along a horizontally and longitudinally extending plate 185. -The rear side ap 124 is also held in folded position by the holding bar 183. lThe plate 185 further serves to support each rear edge of the carton bottoms as the cartons are advanced. 'Ihe movable folder 184 oscillates back and forth and is pivoted at 186 to a frame part 187 connected to the plate 185 of the rear tucking and closing assembly 22, Fig. 3. lA cross Vrod 188 engages at one end a roller 188a slidably carried thereon which is slidably retained in a slot formed in the lower portion of the movable folder 184. A connecting link 189 is secured at the other end, the latter of which is secured intermediate the actuating lever 74 and actuated thereby. The slidable connection between the roller 188a and the rod 188 permits the entire rear as- -sembly 22 to be moved away from or toward the conveyer 'when adjusting forcarton length.

Up and down movement of the cross rod 189 in the The bar 183 is supported on framework of the rear assembly 22 and a carton hold down guide 190 is spaced ,'the'reabove which holds down the rear ends of the cartons wherein the' rear edge of the upper wall of each carton travels substantially directly underneath the bottom edge of the bar 190. This hold down guide or bar sembly 22 by clamping assemblies 19011 and 190b, Fig. 5. Initially, the cartons are guided beneath the bar 190 by an adjustable guide bar 191. The longitudinally extending bar 183 'also serves to hold the side flaps in closed position as the cartons advance through successive stations along the conveyer. Thus, the cartons are received at i their rear ends between the bar 183 and the plate 185 v and the bar 190 may be adjusted up or down to accom- 'modate variations in carton height.`

The next successive station shows the carton as being or plow 192 secured to the bar 183 and spaced slightly above the table or supporting plate 185.

The guide 192 is adjustably secured to a supporting block 193 mounted on the bar 183. Extending from the other`side of this supporting block, a thin tuck ilap breaker bar 194 having a sharp outer edge 195, Fig. 11, lays resiliently'against the supporting table 18S and in This rear tuck flap 127 and the rear end panel 126 as seen in Fig. ll so that the tuck flap 127 may be folded over this The supporting plate 185 at the station open slots 196, threein this case, although any number vmay be employed, which freely receive fingers 197 on a 70.

movable breaking plate 198, Fig. 3, which is arranged to come in toward the conveyer underneath the outer edge of the tuck ilap 127 as seen in Fig. 11. 'Ihe breaking a springu20il, Fig. i The karm 199is adjustably secured to an upstanding lever 201 by a nut and bolt assembly 202 coacting with a longitudinally extending slot 203 in the arm 199 as seen in Figs. 7 and 1l, and a pivotal block 204 pivoting on a pin 205 secured to the lever 201. This pivot block is biased to a predetermined position by a spring 206 secured at one end to the block 204 and at the other end to a pin 207 extending laterally from the lever 201. The lower end of the lever 201 is secured to a shaft 208 which is journalled in a stationary part of the framework of the rear tucking and closing assembly as indicated at 209 in Figs. 3 and 7. At the other end of the shaft, an oscillating lever 210 is mounted thereon and has its free end pivotally connected to a rod 211, Fig. 3. The rod 211 connects pivotally to a lever 212 having one end secured to a longitudinally extending shaft 213 mounted bearingly in a machine part 214 of the rear assembly.

Also connected to the shaft 213 is an arm 215 of a bell crank 216. lntermediately secured to the arm 215 is one end of a U-shaped bar 217 the other end having a roller 218 mounted thereon and engageable with the top edge of a transversely extending bar 219. One end of the bar 219 is pivotally attached to one end of a link 220 which has its other end pivotally connected to a machine part 221 of the machine frame, while the other end of the bar carries a right angularly shaped section which is pivotally connected to the cam operated arm 152 intermediately thereof. Thus, rotation of the cam 156 causes the transversely extending bar 219 to follow an arcuate path dictated by the movement of the U-shaped bar 27 causing the bell crank 216 to oscillate about the shaft 213.

Oscillation of the shaft 213 causes the arcuate movement of the levers 212 and 210 connected by the rod 211 to thereby cause oscillation of the shaft 208 and reciprocation of the breaking plate 198. The mechanism operating the breaking plate 198 is timed to break the tuck ap across the breaker bar 194 when the conveyor is at rest. Inward movevment of the breaking plate 198 causes the ngers and breaker to be somewhat stopped by the edge 195 of the breaker bar so that they pivot therearound and over the outside of the tuck ap to thereby fold the tuck flap over against the top of the breaker bar 194 as seen in Fig. 7. The breaking plate 198 will be adjusted so that as it folds the tuck ap 127 across the breaker bar 194, it and the supporting arm 199 will pivot against the force of the spring 206 and thereby applying a resilient force against the tuck flap and the breaker bar 194. As the breaking plate retracts from the support plate 185, the force of the spring 200 will cause the breaker 198 to return to its normal position as seen in Fig. ll and the spring 206 will cause the supporting arm 199 to return to its normal position as seen in Fig. ll so that it will now be ready for the next inward movement to break the tuck ap of the next successive carton as it moves into position.

Referring again to Fig. 5, as the carton moves to the next station beyond the breaking plate 198, and dwells at the next station, the tuck flap will be further creased against the rear end panel by a creasing roller 222 rotatably mounted on a shaft 223 extending laterally from the supporting arm of the breaking plate 198. The breaker bar 194 extends along the supporting plate 185 and terminates at a position so that at the next successive station it will continue to hold the rear end panel down against the supporting table and provide a positive breaking point between the tuck flap and the end panel to preclude the possibility of developing a second crease in the end panel.

As the carton is advanced by the conveyer from the creasing roller station, the rear end panel is cammed upwardly by a plow or cam 224 adjustably mounted on the top surface of the horizontal support plate 185 as seen in Fig. 5. The rear end panel and the rear tuck llap is then positioned for closing at the next successive station where the conveyor dwells. As seen in Fig. l0,

the plow 224 raises the rear end panel 126 to a nearly upstanding position.

Referring now particularly to Figs. 3, 8, 9, and l0, the rear end of the carton is closed by a rear tucker bar 225 coacting with a rear tuck flap aligning plate 226. The tucker bar 225 is pivotally carried on the end of a supporting arm 227, Fig. 9, and resiliently biased to a predetermined position by a spring 228 so that the leading end of the tucker bar will move in slightly ahead of the trailing end thereof. The front end of the carton is held more relatively square by the opposed plates of the pockets `While the rear end of the carton is subjected to considerable drag which generally prevents the substantially rectangular shape of the carton from being accomplished at the rear end thereof and necessitates pushing in the trailing end of the tuck -ap first in order to preclude jamming of the tucking operation at this point. The tuck flap and end panel are closed by the inward and upward movement of the tucker bar 225 and the inward and downward movement of the tucker plate 226. The tucker bar support arm 227 is adjustably secured to the upper end of arm 229 of the bell crank 216 and accordingly moves inwardly and outwardly by movement of the transversely extending actuating bar 219.

Similarly, the rear tuck flap aligning plate 226 is adjustably secured to the upper end of a movable supporting arm 230, Fig. 10. An angular slot 231 is formed in the supporting arm 230 intermediate thereof for slidably receiving a pin 232 secured to the stationary machine part 214 of the rear assembly. At the lower end of the supporting arm 230, a longitudinally extending slot 233 slidably receives a pin 234 secured to one end of an inverted T-shaped lever 235. The T -shaped lever 235 is pivotally connected t0 the machine part 214 by a stub shaft 236, while the upper end of the lever rotatably carries a roller 237 slidably received in a longitudinally extending slot 238 in the arm 229 of the bell crank 216. Accordingly, counter-clockwise movement of the bell crank 216 about the shaft 213, as seen in Fig. 10, causes the tucker bar 225 to move inwardly and pivot the T-shaped lever 235 in a counter-clockwise direction around the shaft 236. When the pin 234 on the T-shaped lever 235 engages the bottom of the slot 233 in the supporting arm 230, it will pull down the supporting arm 230 and cause the arm to move inwardly and downwardly along the guide slot 231 and the pin 232 to align the tuck ap 127 for entry between the rear side flaps and the top wall of the carton. This linkage arrangement is such that the aligning plate 226 will move the tuck flap 127 downwardly to a point below the top wall of the carton whereby the tucker bar 225 as it moves in will also engage the aligning plate 226 as well as the top edge of the rear end panel 126 and bias upwardly the plate 226 against the force of a spring 239 arranged between the top of the aligning plate 226 and a support member 240 to which the plate 226 is pivotally mounted by a pin 241, Fig. 8. As the tucker bar 225 and aligning plate retract after performing a tucking and closing operation, a spring 242, Fig. l0, will aid in bringing the parts back to their initial position, and a spring 243 will urge the T-shaped member 235 to its initial position.

The mounting plate 214 of the rear assembly is connected to the plate and other parts of the rear assembly and is adjustably mounted to the framework of the machine so that it may be moved inwardly and outwardly from the conveyer thereby lending the parts to adjustability for accommodating variations in carton lengths. To `move the rear tucking and closing assembly 22 toward o1' away from the conveyer, it is only necessary to loosen clamps 244 and 245, Fig. 5, whereby all of the operating components of the rear assembly including the plate 185, the plows, hold down rail, tuck ap breaker, and tucker may be moved together as a unit. In this` respect, the roller 218 on the U-shaped bar 217 which supplies all the power to these moving parts may merely move anywhere along the top edge of the transverse bar 219 torv operate the parts. And inasmuch as the movable folder v184 is also mounted on the rear tucking and closing assembly, it also will move during adjusting thereof.

Advancing of the conveyer beyond the closing and tucking stations and to the ejecting station brings each carton onto the discharge table 24 which extends rearwardly beyond the folding bar 183 of the rear tucking and closing assembly as seen in Figs. 1 and 5 but still under the very end of the rear hold down bar 190. Mounted on the very end of the hold down bar 190 and on the side remote from the conveyer is a longitudinally extending spring pressed roller 246, Fig. 5. The last station at the far left in Fig.,5 shows a carton being ejected from theconveyer pocket associated therewith wherein the ejector 23 merely transfers the carton to-ward the rear of the machine and beneath the spring-pressed roller 246. Preferably, the roller is constructed of nylon, and it serves to slow down the ejection of the carton by resiliently urging the carton and contents against the table 24. The roller 246, being nylon, will not mar or mark the carton. Further, the roller will prevent the contents of the carton from moving relative the carton and possibly opening an end panel. The bracket supporting the roller is adjustably mounted on, the bar 190 so. that the desired pressure against the cartons can be regulated. Rotation of the rotary transfer wheel 25 then causes the arms 47 :thereof which extend through the openings 48 in the discharge table 24 to advance the package longitudinally along the discharge table after the carton has cleared the conveyer pocket.

The present invention, being capable of handling cartons of various sizes, must be able to handle the various sizes with substantially equal facility. The pockets of the conveyer are arranged to embrace the front end of the cartons during the carton closing operations. Ac-

cordingly, longer cartons have a great deal of the carton extending rearwardly of the pocket in unsupported fashion; and in such cases, frictional drag on the rear end of these cartons precludes the rear tucking and closing assembly from operating thereon effectively and thereby Vproduces defective cartoning. This difiiculty is largely overcome by providing a pocket or bucket extension 247, Figs. 2O and 21, which comprises a block 248 having a front carton engaging face 249 coaligned with the carton engaging face of the rear pocket forming plate 30 of each .pocket 16. A spring biased detent 250 is pivotally carried by the block which permits retracting movement past the pocket forming plates, but does not permit the block to move by the plates in the forward direction.- The carton engaging block effectively forms a continuation of the rear pocket forming plate and is spaced laterally adjacent thereto toward the rear tucking and closying assembly. This extension 247 is mounted to move with the pockets between the carton receiving station to the first station of the tucking and closing assemblies, and will retract when the conveyer is at rest to the pocket below the magazine before the carton is inserted into that pocket. A slide bar 251 supports the carton engaging block on one end and is slidably received in a grooved guide block 252 mounted on a longitudinally extending beam 253 of the machine. The other end o-f the slide bar is pivoted to a pin 254 supported at the 'upper end of an actuating lever 255 and the carton block 248 is gravity loaded on the guide block 252. The lower end of the actuating lever 255 is pivotally mounted on cured to a stationary part of the frame, whereby the spring urges the lever forwardly to, in turn, urge the v[carton engaging block 248 in the same direction as the 'conveyer moves and in alignment with the pocket forming plate of the pocket that is engaged by the detent 250.

`Retraction of the pocket extension 247v to the pocket below the magazine is accomplished by the upward stroke of the suction cup slide rod 7 0 which has a cam follower or roller 259 mounted thereon and in engagement with a cam 260 secured to said actuating lever 255. As the suction heads move downwardly to expand in the aligned pocket, the extender is released from action by the cam roller to align with the back pocket forming plate by action of the spring 258. vAdvancing of the'conveyer pocket permits the carton engaging block to advance therewith upon the action of spring 258 and aid in shoving the carton forward.

In the cartoning of highly frangible merchandise, which would necessarily require hand cartoning, the cartons may be expanded and closed at one end by the machineof the present invention, wherein either the front or back tucking and closing assembly may be effectively disconnected to obtain closing of only one end of each carton. Further, should it be desirable to carton merchandise in a straight tuck carton, the rear tucking and closing assembly could be made like the front tucking and closing assembly.

It will be understood that modifications and variations may be effected Without departing from the scope of the novel concepts of the present invention, but it is understood that this application is to be limited only by the scope of the appended claims.

The invention is hereby claimed as follows;

1. A packaging machine comprising a step-by-step conveyer having a plurality of spaced pockets each adapted to hold an expanded carton, a filling mechanism arranged adjacent one end of the conveyer including a plurality of stationary chutes spaced apart a distance equal to the spacing of said pockets, said chutes adapted to contain articles of merchandise, pusher means in said chutes for inserting articles into cartons aligned therewith and held by the pockets, drive means for said conveyer, and means responsive to operation of said pusher means for actuating said drive means to advance the conveyer a predetermined distance thereby removing filled cartons from alignment with said chutes andl bringing empty cartons into alignment with said chutes.

2. A packaging machine comprising a step-by-step conveyer having a plurality of spaced pockets each adapted to hold an expanded carton, means for loading expanded empty cartons into said pockets, a filling mechanism 'arranged adjacent one end of the conveyer including a plurality of stationary chutes spaced apart a distance equal to the spacing of said pockets, said chutes adaptedfto contain articles ofyrnerchandise, pusher means in said chutes for inserting articles into cartonsaligned therewith and held by the pockets, drive means for said conveyer, and means responsive to operation of said pusher means'for actuating said drive means to advance the conveyer a predetermined distance thereby removing filled cartons from alignment with said chutes and bringing empty cartons into alignment with said chutes.

3. A packaging machine comprising a step-by-step conveyer having a plurality lof spaced pockets each adapted to hold an expanded carton, a filling mechanism arranged adjacent one end of the conveyer including a plurality of stationary chutes spaced apart a distance equal to the spacing of said pockets, said chutes adapted to contain articles of merchandise, manually operable pusher means in said chutes for inserting articles into cartons aligned therewith and held by the pockets, drive means for said conveyer, and means responsive to operation of said pusher means for actuating said drive means to advance the conveyer a predetermined distance thereby removing filled cartons from alignment with said chutes and bringing empty cartons into alignment with said chutes.

4. A packaging machine comprising a step-by-step conveyer having a plurality of spaced pockets each adapted to hold an expanded carton, a filling mechanism arranged adjacent one end of the conveyer including va plurality of stationary chutes spaced apart a distance equal to the spacing of said pockets, said chutes adapted to contain articles of merchandise, mechanically operable pusher means in said chutes for inserting articles into cartons aligned therewith and held by the pockets, drive means for said conveyer, and means responsive to operation of said pusher means for actuating said drive means to advance the conveyer a predetermined distance thereby removing filled cartons from alignment with said chutes and bringing empty cartons into alignment with said chutes.

5. A packaging machine comprising, a conveyer having a series of equally spaced conveying pockets adapted to be advanced step-by-step along a predetermined path, each pocket arranged to receive and hold an expanded carton, means for loading expanded empty cartons into said pockets at one end of the conveyer, a filling mechanism laterally adjacent said one end of said conveyer and including a plurality of stationary article receiving chutes spaced apart a distance equal to the spacing of said pockets, transfer means cooperating with said chutes for transferring articles from said chutes into cartons held by said pockets, drive means for advancing said conveyer step-by-step, and means responsive to operation of said transfer means for actuating said drive means to advance the conveyer a predetermined distance thereby removing filled cartons from alignment with said chutes and bringing empty cartons into alignment with said chutes for filling thereof.

6. A packaging machine comprising, a conveyer having a series of equally spaced conveying pockets adapted to be advanced step-by-step along a predetermined path, each pocket arranged to receive and hold an expanded carton, means for loading expanded empty cartons into said pockets at one end of the conveyer, a filling mechanism laterally adjacent said one end of said conveyer and including a plu-rality of stationary article receiving chutes spaced apart a distance equal to the spacing of said pockets, reciprocable pusher means cooperating with said chutes for transferring articles from said chutes into cartons held by said pockets, drive means for advancing said conveyer step-by-step, and means responsive to operation f said reciprocable pusher means for actuating said drive means to advance the conveyer a predetermined distance thereby removing filled cartons from alignment with said chutes and bringing empty cartons into alignment with said chutes for filling thereof.

7. A packaging machine comprising, a conveyer having a series of equally spaced conveying pockets adapted to be advanced step-by-step along a predetermined path. each pocket arranged to receive and hold an expanded carton, means for loading expanded empty cartons into said pockets at one end of the conveyer, a lling mechanism laterally adjacent said one end of said conveyer and including `a plurality of stationary article receiving chutes spaced apart a distance equal to the spacing of said pockets, reciprocable pusher means cooperating with said chutes for transferring articles from said chutes into cartons held by said pockets, drive means for advancing said conveyer step-by-step, and switch means operable by said pusher means after the articles have been completely transferred into said cartons for actuating said drive means to advance the conveyer a predetermined distance thereby removing filled cartons from alignment with said chutes and bringing empty cartons into alignment with said chutes for filling thereof.

8, A packaging machine comprising, a conveyer having a. series orf equally spaced conveying pockets adapted to be advanced step-by-step along a predetermined path, each pocket arranged to receive and hold an expanded carton, means for loading expanded empty cartons into said pockets at one end of the conveyer, a filling mechanism laterally adjacent said one end of said conveyer and including a plurality of stationary article receiving chutes spaced apart a distance equal to the spacing of said pockets, reciprocable pusher means cooperating with said chutes for transferring articles from said chutes into cartons held by said pockets, drive means for advancing said conveyer step-by-step, switch means operable by said pusher means after the articles have been completely transferred into said cartons for actuating said drive means to advance the conveyer a predetermined distance thereby removing filled cartons from alignment with said chutes and bringing empty cartons into alignment with said chutes for filling thereof, means along said conveyer for tucking the front and back end panels and tuck flaps, and means for ejecting the filled cartons from the co veyer at the other end thereof.

9. A packaging machine comprising, a conveyor having a series of equally spaced conveying pockets adapted to be advanced step-by-step along a predetermined path, each pocket arranged to receive and hold an expanded carton, means for loading expanded empty cartons into said pockets at one end of the conveyor, a filling mechanism laterally adjacent said one end of said conveyor and including a plurality of stationary article receiving chutes spaced apart a distance equal to the spacing of said pockets, reciprocable pusher means cooperating with said chutes for transferring articles from said chutes into cartons held by said pockets, drive means for advancing said conveyer step-by-step, switch means operable by said pusher means after the articles have been completely transferred into said cartons for actuating said drive means to advance the conveyer a predetermined distance thereby removing filled cartons from alignment with said chutes and bringing empty cartons into alignment with said chutes for filling thereof, and means along said conveyor for closing both ends of said cartons.

10. A packaging machine comprising, a conveyer having a series of equally spaced conveying pockets adapted to be advanced step-by-step along a predetermined path, each pocket arranged to receive and hold an expanded carton, means for loading expanded empty cartons into said pockets at one end of the conveyer, a filling mechanism laterally adjacent said one end of said conveyer and including a plurality of stationary article receiving chutes spaced apart a distance equal to the spacing of said pockets, manually operable reciprocable pusher means cooperating with said chutes for transferring articles from said chutes into cartons held by said pockets, drive means for advancing said conveyer step-by-step, and switch means operable by said pusher means after the articles have been completely transferred into said cartons for actuating said drive means to advance the conveyer a predetermined distance thereby removing lled cartons from alignment with said chutes and bringing empty cartons into alignment with said chutes for filling thereof.

11. A packaging machine comprising, a conveyer having a series of equally spaced conveying pockets adapted to be advanced step-by-step along a predetermined path, each pocket arranged to receive and hold an expanded carton, means for loading expanded empty cartons into said pockets at one end of the conveyer, a filling mechanism laterally adjacent said one end of said conveyer and including a plurality of stationary article receiving chutes spaced apart a distance equal to the spacing of said pockets, reciprocable pusher means cooperating With said chutes for transferring articles from said chutes into cartons held by said pockets, means along both sides of said conveyer for closing the ends of the cartons, means at the other end of the conveyer for ejecting a filled and closed carton therefrom, drive means for advancing the conveyer step-by-step and for substantially simultaneously operating said loading means, carton closing means and ejecting means, and switch means operable by said pusher means after said pusher means has completely transferred the articles into the cartons for actuating said drive means and thereby cause a sequential operation of said conveyer and all said means.

12. A packaging machine comprising, a conveyer having a series of equally spaced conveying pockets adapted to be advanced step-by-step along a predetermined path, each pocket arranged to receive and hold an expanded carton, means for loading expanded empty cartons into said pockets at one end of the conveyer, a filling mechanism laterally adjacent said one end of said conveyer and including a plurality of stationary article receiving chutes spaced apart a distance equal to the spacing of said pockets, reciprocable pusher means cooperating with said chutes for transferring articles from said chutes into cartons held by said pockets, drive means for advancing said conveyer step-by-step, switch means operable by movement of said pusher means after the pusher means has transferred the articles completely into the cartons for actuating said drive means, and switch means mount- 'ed adjacent said drive means for stopping said drive means after a cycle of operation has been completed.

13. A packaging machine comprising, a conveyer having a series of equally spaced conveying pockets adapted to be advanced step-by-step along a predetermined path, each pocket arranged to receive and hold an expanded carton, means for loading expanded empty cartons into said pockets at one end of the conveyer, a lling mechanism laterally adjacent said one end of said conveyer and including a plurality of stationary article receiving chutes spaced apart a distance equal to the spacing of said pockets, reciprocable pusher means cooperating with said chutes for transferring articles from said chutes into cartons held by said pockets, means along both sides of said conveyer for closing the ends of the cartons, means at the other end of the conveyer for ejecting a filled and closed carton therefrom, drive means for advancing the conveyer step-by-step and for substantially simultaneously operating said loading means, carton closing means and ejecting means, switch means operable by said pusher means after said pusher means has transferred the articles `into the cartons for actuating said drive means and thereby causing a sequential operation of said conveyer and all said means, and switch means mounted adjacent said drive means for stopping said drive means after a cycle of operation of predetermined duration has been completed.

14. A packaging machine comprising a conveyer having a plurality of spaced pockets, means at the head end of the conveyer for inserting an expanded carton into each pocket when the conveyer is at rest, a filling mechanism laterally adjacent said head end of said conveyer, said lling mechanism including a plurality of spaced stationary article receiving chutes, each chute aligning with a pocket when the conveyer is at rest, reciprocable pusher means for transferring articles from the chutes into the cartons held by the aligned pockets, front and back tuckers for closing the end flaps of the cartons as the cartons are advanced by the conveyer, an ejector at the tail end of the conveyer for ejecting filled and closed cartons therefrom, drive means for operating said conveyer step-by-step and for operating the inserting means, the tuckers and the ejector in timed relation therewith, and switch means actuated by said pusher means after the articles have been transferred into said cartons to effect operation of said drive means.

15. A packaging machine comprising, a conveyor having a plurality of spaced pockets, a magazine at the head end of the conveyer for receiving a stack of cartons in attened condition, first means for removing the cartons from the magazine one at a time and expanding each carton and depositing it in a conveyer pocket when the conveyer is at rest, filling mechanism laterally adjacent the head end of the conveyer including a plurality of stationary article receiving chutes spaced apart a distance equal to the spacing of said pockets and reciprocable pusher means for transferring the articles from the chutes to the cartons in the aligned pockets when the conveyer is at rest, front and rear tuckers along opposite lilil sides of the conveyer for closing the opposite ends of the cartons, common drive means for operating the conveyer step-by-step and for operating said first means and said tuckers in timed relation with said conveyor, and switch means operated by said pusher means after the articles have been transferred into said cartons for actuating said drive means through a predetermined cycle.

16. A packaging machine comprising, a conveyer having a series of equally spaced conveying pockets adapted to be advanced step-by-step along a predetermined path, each pocket arranged to receive and hold an expanded carton, means for loading expanded empty cartons into said pockets at one end of the conveyor, filling mechanism for filling at least one carton at a time including stationary supporting means for supporting articles adjacent the conveyor pockets and means for transferring the articles from said supporting means .to the cartons in the conveyor pockets, means along both sides of said conveyer for closing the ends of the cartons, means at the other end of the conveyer for ejecting a filled and closed carton therefrom, drive means for advancing the conveyer step-by-step and for substantially simultaneously operating said loading means, carton closing means and ejecting means, and switch means operable by said filling mechanism for actuating said drive means and thereby cause a sequential operation of said conveyer and all said means.

17. A packaging machine comprising, a conveyer having a series of equally spaced conveying pockets adapted to be advanced step-by-step along a predetermined path, each pocket arranged to receive and hold an expanded carton, means for loading expanded empty cartons into said pockets at one end of the conveyor, filling mechanism for filling atleast one carton at a time including stationary supporting means for supporting articles adjacent the conveyor pockets and means for transferring the articles from said supporting means to the cartons in the conveyer pockets, drive means for advancing said conveyer step-by-step, switch means operable by said filling mechanism to actuate said drive means, and switch means mounted adjacent said drive means for stopping said drive means after a cycle of operation has been completed.

18. A packaging machine comprising a conveyer having a plurality of spaced pockets, means at the head end of the conveyer for inserting an expanded carton into each pocket when the conveyer is at rest, filling mechanism for filling at least one carton at a time including stationary supporting means for supporting articles adjacent the conveyor pockets and means for transferring the articles from said supporting means to the cartons in the conveyor pockets, front and back tuckers for closing the end flaps of the cartons as the cartons are advanced by the conveyer, an ejector at the tail end of the conveyer for ejecting filled and closed cartons therefrom, drive means for operating said conveyer step-bystep and for operating the inserting means, the tuckers and the ejector in timed relation therewith, and switch means actuated by said filling mechanism after the cartons have been filled to effect operation of said drive means.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,177,719 Milmoe Apr. 4, 1916 1,337,404 Jones Apr. 20, 1920 1,893,169 Hartmann Jan. 3, 1933 2,578,277 Andrews Dec. 1l, 1951 2,581,042 Otto Jan. 1, 1952 2,590,823 Rhodes Mar. 25, 1952 2,612,016 Anderson Sept. 30, 1952 2,678,151 Geisler May 11, 1954 2,698,706 Goepfert et al. Jan. 4, 1955 2,762,274- Kerr Sept. 11, 1956 2,844,927 Warner July 29, 1958

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3325977 *Nov 22, 1963Jun 20, 1967Rolf KirstenPacking machine
US3800677 *May 3, 1971Apr 2, 1974Xepex Ind IncApparatus for forming carton
US4081945 *Nov 15, 1976Apr 4, 1978The Mead CorporationPackaging machine for use with cartons of different sizes with minimum adjustment
US5257495 *Jun 19, 1992Nov 2, 1993Borsani Angel OAutomatic packaging machine
US5531056 *May 6, 1994Jul 2, 1996Riverwood International CorporationMethod and apparatus for stabilizing cartons in a packaging machine
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DE1761022B *Mar 22, 1968Jul 29, 1971Tetra Pak Rausing & Co KgVorrichtung zum Umformen von gefuellten und verschlossenen kissenfoermigen Verpackungen aus kunststoffbeschichtetem Papier in Quaderform
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DE4013274A1 *Apr 26, 1990Oct 31, 1991Bosch Gmbh RobertCarton packing machine with parallel entrainment members - has vertically adjustable guide rail between conveyor paths of boxes and product buckets
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DE102012005300A1 *Mar 19, 2012Sep 19, 2013Herbert RothDevice for partial screwing of screw cap on bottle using internal thread, and for use in plant for filling and sealing of bottles, has rotor and receptacle, which are arranged at radial distance from each other
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WO1996011141A2 *Oct 5, 1995Apr 18, 1996Interbake Foods, Inc.Box hopper and picker for conveyor line packaging
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Classifications
U.S. Classification53/75, 53/284, 53/566, 53/252
International ClassificationB65B7/20, B65B5/06, B65B43/26, B31B5/80
Cooperative ClassificationB31B2201/29, B65B7/20, B65B5/06, B31B2203/003, B65B43/265, B31B1/80, B31B2201/027, B31B2201/287, B31B1/06
European ClassificationB31B1/80, B31B1/06, B65B5/06, B65B7/20, B65B43/26C