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Publication numberUS2910099 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 27, 1959
Filing dateMar 16, 1956
Priority dateMar 16, 1956
Publication numberUS 2910099 A, US 2910099A, US-A-2910099, US2910099 A, US2910099A
InventorsWilliam Mall Arthur
Original AssigneeRemington Arms Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Take-up handle for chain saw
US 2910099 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 27, 1959 A. w. MALL TAKE-UP HANDLE Fox CHAIN sAw INVENTR:

ne@ aaron 16, 1956 Patented Oct. 27, 1959 TAKE-Ul HANDLE FOR CHAIN SAW Arthur William Mall, Flossmoor, lll., assigner, by mesne assignments, to Remington Arms Company, Inc., Bridgeport, Conn., a corporation of Delaware Application March 16, 1956, Serial No. 572,055

5 Claims. (Cl. 14S-32) This invention relates to an auxliary or helper handle assembly for a chain saw, and more especially to a snapon take-up handle for use with chain saws having an idler roller at the outer end of 'the guide bar thereof.

A chain saw generally comprises a rigid guide plate or bar connected at one end to a clutch assembly that is power driven usually by a gasoline engine. The outer end of the guide bar is free, and the saw chain passes over the guide bar and is drivingly coupled through the clutch to the engine. There are a number of instances where it is desirable to provide a handle assembly at the outer free end of the guide bar. For example, a helper handle assembly so located is of aid in transporting the chain saw-for being tixedly secured to the guide bar, it permits a workman to support a portion of the chain saw by grasping that helper handle. Another example of a utility afforded by a helper handle of this character is that of permitting the chain saw to be guided in cutting operations wherein a straight or true or precision cut is requisite, as in railroad work, bridge construction, etc. It will be apparent that in such operations, one man will manipulate the saw apparatus from the engine end thereof, while another man aids in the manipulation through the helper handle.

There is another situation wherein a helper handle of the character described is useful if it has special characteristics. This situation is where it is desired to provide a means for adjusting the tension of the saw chain that traverses the guide bar. In such an arrangement, means will be provided wherein adjustment of the handle will be operative in ellect to lengthen or shorten the guide bar. This feature will be described in greater detail as the specification develops.

It is not practicable to provide a chain saw that has a permanent or auxiliary helper handle at the outer end of the guide bar, for numerous saw operations now being performed are in the nature of plunge cuts wherein the outer end of the guide bar and the saw chain traversing the same are plunged centrally into the log or timber, and the saw cuts its way therethrough much as a drill would bore a hole centrally through a log. It will be evident that for operations of this type, it is essential that the outer end of the guide bar be free and clear of obstructions of any kind.

There isa need then for an auxiliary or helper handle assembly for use with chain saws that may be removably mounted at the outer end of the guide bar, and even more particularly the need exists for such a handle assembly which may be quickly and easily mounted and removed by even the most unskilled workman, preferably without the need for elaborate tools, and it is accordingly an object of the invention to provide such an arrangement.

Still another object of the invention is in the provision of a take-up helper handle that is quickly and easily mounted on and removed from a chain saw guide bar. Yet another object is to provide a snap-on take-up helper handle for chain saws and the like.

' to the guide bar in a simple, expedient manner.

Yet a further object of the invention is to provide in combination with a chain saw having a guide plate, an idler roller assembly mounted on the guide plate at the outer end thereof in a manner which permits the idler roller assembly to be moved longitudinally with respect to the guide bar, and to arrange in this structure a take-up helper handle lixedly secured to the guide bar and having a movable element secured to the idler roller and being cooperatively arranged with adjusting means for shifting this member so as to move the idler roller assembly along the longitudinal axis of the guide bar. Still a further object is to provide an arrangement of the character described wherein the idler roller assembly is provided with an opening therethrough into which is readily inserted a portion of the movable member of the helper handle, and wherein the helper handle is iixedly secured Additional objects and advantages, both specii'c and general in character, will become apparent as the speciiication develops.

An embodiment of the invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in which- Figure l is a side view in elevation of a structural arrangement embodying the invention, and in which parts are broken away to show portions of the structure in section; Figure 2 is a longitudinal partial sectional view as seen along the line 2-2 of Figure l; and Figure 3 is a broken longitudinal sectional view taken along the line 3-3 of Figure 2.

Figure l illustrates the outer end portion of a guide bar or plate that is designated with the numeral 10. As is well known in the art, the inner end (not illustratedl of the guide bar will be secured to the housing of a clutch and engine assembly, and the saw chain, which is designated by the broken lines 11 in Figure l. is entraind about the guide bar l0, and willbe coupled with a power driven drive sprocket which will move the chain over the guide bar. The outer end of the guide bar is arcuate, and more specifically is concave inwardly as shown at 12. The center of the arc or concavity 12 is at the point 13. Extending rearwardly or toward the inner end ofthe guide bar, centrally of the arcuate recess 12 and communicating therewith, is a generally rectangular slot 14.

Mounted on the end of the guide bar is an idler roller assembly 15 which, as is seen most clearly in Figure 2, comprises a pair of outer plates 16 and 17 which are spaced from each other by a distance which permits the end of the guide bar 10 to be inserted therebetween. A spacer 18 is interposed between the plates 16 and 17, and is secured in position therebetween by a plurality of rivets 19. The spacer 18 is dimensioned so as to be snugly but slidably received within the slot 14 in the guide bar.

The plates 16 and 17 project outwardly from the guide bar 10, and are spaced apart so as to rotatably receive therebetween an idler roller or wheel 20. The wheel 20 is freely rotatable with respect to the plates 16 and 17 and with respect to the guide bar 10, and is provided along the peripheral edge thereof with a channel 21 adapted to receive a portion of the saw links 22 therein which are connected together so as to comprise the saw chain 11. It will be appreciated that the guide -bar 10 along the longitudinal axis thereof is provided with channels corresponding to the channel 21, which also receive a portion of the links 22. Centrally, the plates 16 and 17 are provided with an opening 23 extending transversely therethrough which has a use that will be described hereinafter.

While not so illustrated, the roller or wheel 20 is mounted upon bearings that ride on a stationary race interposed between the plates 16 and 17. In the event 3 that a more detailed description and illustration of the idler roller assembly 15 is desired, reference may be made to the copending application of Arthur W. Mall, Serial No. 733,793, filed May 5, 1958.

Partially enclosing the outer end of the guide bar 10 and the idler roller assembly\15 is a snap-on take-up helper handle assembly that is designated generally with the numeral 24. The handle assembly 24 comprises a casing or shell 25 having a ange 26 extending laterally therefrom that denes a partial compartment or closure 27 that receives the idler roller assembly l5 and outer end of the guide bar therein. The shell 25 is equipped at its inner end with a boss 28 having a passage therethrough that receives therein the shank 29 of a threaded bolt having a head 30 in the form of a handle that can be readily gripped and rotated. 'Ihe shank 29 of the bolt is elongated and extends through an elongated slot or opening 31 formed in the guide bar 10, and which is centrally disposed with respect thereto along its longitudinal axis. The nut 32 is adapted to be threadedly received on the shank of the bolt and, as is shown in Figure l, is large enough to bear against the edges of the guide plate which define the slot 31. By this nut and bolt arrangement, the shell 25 of the helper handle assembly can be tixedly secured to the guide bar 10 in a convenient and simple manner, and can be released therefrom with facility.

Intermediate the ends of the shell 25 are spread shell portions 33 and 34 that are spaced apart to deline a nut chamber 35 and a passage 36 communicating therewith. Mounted within the chamber 35 for slidable movement along the longitudinal axis of the guide bar 10 is a threaded adjusting nut or adjusting member 37 having a projection or stem 38 extending laterally therefrom which is of polygonal cross section, and is dimensioned to correspond to the size of the opening 23 through the plates 16 and 17 so as to be insertable thereinto. 'Ihreadedly received within the adjusting member 37 is a threaded end 39 of a shaft 40, and the shaft is elongated so as to extend outwardly beyond the end of the shell 25, which at that time terminates in an annular collar 41.

Surrounding the outer end of the shaft 40 and fixed thereto by a pin or key 42 is a handle element or handgrip element 43 having a longitudinally extending passage 44 therethrough for receiving the shaft. Intermediate the ends of the passage 44 is a combination spring seat 45 which surrounds the shaft 40 and firmly positions the same with respect to the handle element 43. Bearing at one end against the spring seat 45 is a coil spring 46- that at its other end bears against the pin 42. It will be apparent that the pin 42 extends transversely across the shaft 40 through a passageway provided therefor, and

the outer ends of the pin are received within internal recesses 47 and 48, respectively, provided along the passage 44. Thus, longitudinal movement of the handle element with respect to the shaft is afforded, but relative rotational movement therebetween is inhibited. The enlarged outer end of the handle element 43 may have a closure spring plate 49 mounted therein to close 0E the passage 44.

The handle element 43 adjacent its inner end is pro vided with an annular enlargement 50 that corresponds dimensionally to the annular collar 44 of the shell 25. Interposed between the enlargement 50 and collar 41 is a bearing washer 51 that permits the handle element to be rotated readily with respect to the shell. Locking means are provided to selectively prevent rotation of the handle element 43 and the shaft 44 secured thereto, and this locking arrangement is designated generally with the numeral 52.

The locking device 52 comprises a tube 53 that may be formed integrally with the annular collar 41 of the shell and extends outwardly therefrom. The tube 53 has a passage extending therethrough, and mounted for axial a head 55 and having also a pin 56 extending transversely thereacross adjacent to and inwardly of the head 55. The pin 56 is adapted to seat within a recess 57 formed for that purpose in the outer end of the tube 53. The passage through the tube is restricted at 58 to provide a seat for one end of a helical spring 59 which at its other end seats against an annular ange 60 provided by the pin. The spring biases the pin inwardly and into the position shown in Figure 1. The pin 54 is somewhat longer than the tube 53, and has an inner end portion adapted to be received within one of a plurality of annular recesses 61 formed at spaced points about the inner end of the handle element 43. While one such recess 61 would be sullcient, it is desired to provide a pluralitypreferably at intervals spaced from each other so as to afford a ner selection in the adjustable setting of the handle.

The chain saw may be used in a conventional manner when the handle assembly 24 is removed therefrom. At such time, the outer end of the guide bar and the idler roller assembly are free, and the saw may be used in plunge cutting operations and otherwise. The force of the chain 11 passing over the roller 20 will keep the idler roller assembly 15 in place, and frictional resistance to the movement of the chain 11 is held at a minimum at the end of the bar because the roller 20 is supported for relatively free rotation on bearings.

When it is desired lto use the helper handle assembly 24, the protuberance or projection 38 is snapped through the openings 23 to place it in the position shown in Figure 2. At the same time, the nut 32 is turned to a position wherein the major axis thereof extends along the longitudinal axis of the slot 31, and the nut may be passed freely through that slot. Thereafter, it is turned 90 into the position shown in Figures l and 2. and the shell 25 is ixedly secured to the guide bar 10 by turning the knob or head 30 of the bolt to tighten the nut 32. The helper handle assembly may now be used as an aid in carrying or transporting the chain saw apparatus, and it may also be used by a workman to guide the outer end of the bar 10 and chain 11 to insure a precision severance of a log or timber by the chain saw.

In order to adjust the snap-on helper handle 24 so as to determine the tension in the chain 11, the pin 54 is elevated by lifting the head 55 thereof, and it is maintained in elevated position after rotation slightly so as to misalign the pin 56 and recesses 57. The pin may then be released, and the transverse key or pin 56 bearing against the outer edge of the tube 53 will maintain the end of the pin 54 in withdrawn position with respect to the recesses 61 in the handle element 43. Thereafter, the handle element 43 may be rotated in a clockwise direction to thread the adjusting member 37 along the shaft 40, and to the right thereof as viewed in Figure 2, whereby the idler assembly 51 will be moved outwardly along the longitudinal axis of the guide bar 10 to tension the chain 11. If the handle assembly 43 is rotated in the opposite direction, the adjusting member or nut 37 will move to the left, whereby the idler assembly 15 will be moved to the left and greater slack will be provided in the chain 11.

When the tension in the chain 11 is suitably established, the head 55 of the pin 54 is rotated to align the transverse key 56 with the slots or recesses 57. The spring 59 will urge the end of the pin 54 downwardly and into any of the recesses 61 which are aligned therewith. It will be apparent that once the locking pin 54 is released, the handle element 43 may be rotated slightly in either direction to bring one of the recesses 61 into alignment therewith.

The helper handle assembly is mounted on the guide bar 10 and idler roller assembly 15 in a single operation as described, and may be removed therefrom in a reverse operatiu that is simple and easy to carry out.

All that is required is that the head 30 of the locking bolt be rotated to loosen the nut 32, whereby the nut can be aligned with the slot 31 so as to slip there-' through. The projection 38 can then be snapped from its extended position through the openings 23 in the idler roller assembly. Thus, in a minimum of time and in simple operations, the chain saw can beconverted for plunge cutting operations and guided precision cutting operations.

The coil spring 46 is a relatively strong or heavy spring that under normal sawing conditions is effective to provide a direct connection between the saw chain 22 and the shell 25. Such couple between the shell and saw chain includes the handle 43, abutment member 45, spring 46, pin 42, shaft 40, member 37 and its polygonal stem 38, and the idler bearing assembly 15. However, since the tension of the chain 22 is transferred to the shell through the spring, the spring prevents over-tensioning of the chain since it acts as a` shock absorber and accepts abnormal loads.

While in the foregoing specication an embodiment of the invention has been described in considerable detail for purposes of illustration, .it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that numerous changes may be made therein without'departing from the spirit and principles of the invention.

I claim:

l. In combination with a chain saw having an elongated guide bar equipped with a longitudinally lextending slot at the outer end thereof, an adjustable roller assembly at the outer end of said bar comprising a pair of spaced support plates having opposing surface portions frictionally bearing against the side surfaces of said guide bar, a spacer rigidly secured between said plates and being slidable longitudinally in said slot for guiding longitudinal movement of said assembly, a roller rotatably carried between said plates, and a take-up handle assembly comprising a shell removably secured to the outer end of said guide bar, an adjustable member carried by said shell for movement along the longitudinal axis of said bar and being connected with said roller assembly, and means coupled with said adjustment member for moving the same to shift said roller assembly longitudinally with respect to said guide bar.

2. The structure of claim 1 in which said adjustable member has an extension projecting laterally therefrom,

and in which said roller assembly has an opening there through removably receiving said extension therein'.

3. In combination with a chain saw having an elongated guide bar equipped with a longitudinally extending slot having longitudinal edges extending inwardly from the outer end thereof, a longitudinally adjustable roller assembly at the outer end of said car comprising a pair of spaced support plates having inner end portions snugly but slidably receiving the slotted outer end of said bar therebetween, a spacer interposed between the inner end portions of said support plates and being rigidly secured thereto, said spacer having longitudinal edges slidably engaging the longitudinal edges of said slot and Ibeing slidable longitudinally in said slot for guiding longitudinal movement of said roller assembly with reference to said guide bar, a roller rotatably carried between the outer end portions of said support plates, and a takeup handle assembly comprising a shell detachably connected adjacent its inner end to said guide bar, an adjustable member carried by said shell for movement along the longitudinal axis of said bar and being con nected with said roller assembly, and means coupled with said adjustable member for moving the same to shift said roller assembly longLtudinally with reference to said guide bar.

4. The structure of claim "iiwhich the inner end of said spacer is adapted to alrlut the innermost edge of said slot for limiting inward longitudinal movement of said adjustable roller assembly and for preventing engagement between the periphery of said roller and said guide bar.

5. The structure of claim 3 in which said adjustable member is provided with a laterally projecting extension, and in which said roller assembly is provided with an opening therethrough for removably receiving said extension.

References Cited in the iile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,670,214 Roche May 15, 1928 2,184,461 Mall Dec. 26, 1939 2,444,132 Gordon et al. June 29, 1948 2,527,251 Gordon Oct. 24, 1950 2,642,100 Quirke June 16, 1953 2,670,017 Fiest Feb. 23, 1954 2,728,566 Barnett Dec. 27, 1955

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1670214 *Mar 5, 1924May 15, 1928Paul RocheSpanner or nut wrench
US2184461 *Oct 4, 1937Dec 26, 1939William Mall ArthurChain saw construction
US2444132 *Apr 13, 1944Jun 29, 1948Mall Tool CompanyChain saw machine
US2527251 *Mar 31, 1945Oct 24, 1950Mall Tool CompanyChain saw
US2642100 *Mar 15, 1948Jun 16, 1953Thomas Quirke AlanRemovable handle assembly for power chain saws
US2670017 *Nov 29, 1948Feb 23, 1954Fiest Max HTensioning means for poweroperated chain saws
US2728566 *May 4, 1953Dec 27, 1955Barnett Joseph FCoal cutting bar head
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3435859 *Mar 22, 1968Apr 1, 1969Walker Charles MChain saw attachment
US3866320 *Mar 4, 1974Feb 18, 1975Textron IncGuide bar adjustment for chain saw
US4355551 *Jun 30, 1980Oct 26, 1982Kolleas Pete DChain saw bar attachment
US4558518 *Dec 30, 1982Dec 17, 1985Morabit Vincent DTip stabilizing device for a chain saw
US4569135 *Dec 27, 1983Feb 11, 1986Morabit Vincent DChain saw tip stabilizing device for use with an antikickback device
US4819335 *Sep 9, 1987Apr 11, 1989Pro Power CorporationDetachable blade assembly for a chain saw
US5528835 *Nov 29, 1994Jun 25, 1996Ra; Do-JinChain saw tensioning apparatus
US6560879Aug 2, 2001May 13, 2003Wci Outdoor Products, Inc.Chain saw adjuster
US6679149Jul 6, 1999Jan 20, 2004Premark Feg L.L.C.Band saw apparatus with blade tensioner and related method
Classifications
U.S. Classification30/385, 83/816
International ClassificationB27B17/14, B27B17/00
Cooperative ClassificationB27B17/14, B27B17/0008
European ClassificationB27B17/14, B27B17/00B