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Publication numberUS2911123 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 3, 1959
Filing dateJul 23, 1956
Priority dateJul 23, 1956
Publication numberUS 2911123 A, US 2911123A, US-A-2911123, US2911123 A, US2911123A
InventorsGeno Saccomanno
Original AssigneeGeno Saccomanno
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bottle cap
US 2911123 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 3, 1959 G. SACCOMANNO 2,

BOTTLE CAP Filed July 23, 1956 Inventor G's/v0 SAcca/M A I/a orneg/ United States Patent F BOTTLE CAP Geno Saccomanno, Grand Junction, Colo. 7 Application July 23, 1956, Serial No. 599,466 6 Claims. (Cl. 215-48) The subject matter of this invention relates to a bottle cap containing therein an isolated receptacle chamber with I provisions for simultaneous filling of the said receptacle chamber and the contents of the bottle.

In particular such a bottle cap can be used inconjunction with a blood bottle. Pilot tubes containing a sample of the blood contained in the permanent container are in widespread use. The function of the pilot tube is to provide a sampling source to test compatability between the donors blood and the'blood of the recipient. By this means of sampling, no risk of contaminationis Patented Nov. 3, 1 959 ice to be within the chamber of the cap when the needle is fully inserted. One of the openings allows a portion of the liquid flowing through the needle 'to enter the isolated chamber and the other opening allows escape of the air from the chamber when it is being filled with liquid. Thus, both the bottle and the isolated receptacle'within the bottle cap-are simultaneously filled.

After filling has been completed the hypodermic needle can be removed, thus isolating the fluid sample through the action of the self-sealing closure.

The device of Figures 1 and 2 comprises a bottle cap 1 made of rubber or similar self-sealing resilient material whose dimensions can be so selected as to snugly fit into any chosen bottle 2. The bottle cap 1 contains an outlet tube 3 and an air vent tube 4 so the contents of the bottle 2 may be emptied without removing the bottle cap 1.

Within the bottle cap 1 is an isolated receptacle chamber 5 with the walls 6 thereof lined with silicone or similar material which serves to adapt the receptacle chamber 5 to receive and store fluids more efliciently.

The isolated receptacle chamber 5, in effect, isa hollowed portion of the bottle cap 1, thus, naturally proincurrcd'as it would be by-removing a sample from the permanent container. 1

Since previous procedures involve separate filling of the permanent container and the pilot tube container, an unavoidable risk of human error in handling is involved. It is imperative that both the pilot tube and the bottle have the same blood from any one donor; It has been necessary to rely on the meticulous care of the operator to attach the correct pilot tube to each blood bottle. Such handling can never be free from the possibility of error, and an error may have tragic consequences.

The principal object of this invention is to provide a bottle cap which precludes any possibility of the contents of the bottle being different from the contents in the sampling receptacle.

Another object of this invention is to provide a convenient and simple means whereby an isolated chamber within a bottle cap,- and the bottle, maybe filled in one operation.

These and other objects and advantages will beunderstood by reference to the detailed description and theaccompanying drawing in which there is illustrated a selected embodiment of the bottle cap.

In the drawing: v I

Figure 1 is a top view of the bottle cap showing the relative positions of the receptacle chamber, the inlet tube and the air vent tube;

Figure 2 is vertical sectional view taken along the lines 2 2 of Figure 1; Figure 3 is'a vertical sectional view showing a modific-ation of the isolated receptacle chamber whereby the top cover can be removed;

Figure 4 is a top view showing a modification in which the inlet and air vent tubes are eliminated;

Figure 5 is a longitudinal sectional view of a needle for use in filling the blood container and pilot sample cap.

in the accomplishment of the foregoing objects and in accordance with the invention there is now provided a bottle'cap which serves the dual function of a sealing cap for the opening of a bottle, and as an isolated receptacle chamber to simultaneously collect a sample of the fluid introduced into the bottle. The sealed cap has penetrable closures. at each end so that a hypodermic needle may be inserted. through bothclosures, thus conveying a supply of fluid from an outside source to the interior of the bottle. The shank of the needle has two openings adapted viding circular sidewalls 6 and a bottom for the receptacle'chamber 5. The receptacle chamber 5 is completely isolated'by placing a hard nylonreceptacle cap 9 snugly into a groove or indentation 11 located in the circular wall 6 of the receptacle chamber 5. The center of the receptacle cap 9 is provided with a circular diaphragm 10 made of rubber or other equivalent penetrable, self-sealing material. This diaphragm should be at least 4 mm. in thickness to assure self-sealing after removal'of a hypodermic needle.

The receptacle cap 9 can be made of hard material equivalent to nylon which is designed to withstand conditions of sterilization in the event such treatment is desired. The resting position of the receptacle cap 9 is at i a point below the top of the bottle 2 so that the pressure from the sides of the bottle 2 top may be directed toenhance the tight fit of the receptacle cap 9 in the indentation 11 in the circular margin of the receptacle wall 6.

In order to fill the bottle 2 and the receptacle chamber 5 a specially prepared hypodermic needle 8 is inserted through the penetrable diaphragm 10 in the receptacle cap 9, into the receptacle chamber 5 and then through the penetrable floor of the receptacle chamber 5 so that the tip of the needle 8 extends into the interior of thebottle 2. j

The needle 8 has specially adapted openings 12 and 13 in its shank. The length of the needle 8 is so selected,

and the positioning of the openings 12 and 13 is so arranged that when the needle 8 is fully inserted the openings 12 and 13 in the shank are .located in the upper portion of the receptacle 5 and the tip of the needle 8 extends into the interior of the bottle 2. The fully inserte position of the needle 8 isdepicted in Figure 2. p Liquid such as blood from an outside source is directed into the bottle 2 by way of the needle 8 at which time simultaneous filling of the receptacle chamber 5 and bottle 2 occurs. This function will be more fully vdeveloped laterin conjunction with Figure 5.

ber 5 for later sampling may be accomplished by insert ing vthe needle of a hypodermic syringe through the penetrable self-sealing diaphragm 10 in the receptacle cap 9 in Figure 2 and withdrawing the desired volume of sample fluid into the syringe.

Figure 1 is a top' view showing the relative positions of the receptacle chamber 5, the receptacle cap 9 and the penetrable diaphragm 10. These aforementioned structures are placed eccentrically in the bottle cap 1 to allow space for insertion of the conventional outlet tube 3 and the air vent tube 4.

Figure 4 is a modification of the top view of Figure 1 in which'the receptacle cap 9 and the underlying receptacle chamber 5 are located centrally in the bottle cap 1. The air vent 4 and outlet tube 3 have been eliminated. This modification is provided in the event removal of the bottle cap 1 prior to'emptying the contents of the bottle 2 is desired.

Figure 3 is a vertical sectional view showing a modifi: cation of the receptacle cap whereby the cap can be removed for withdrawal of the fluid sample from the chamber 5. The receptacle cap 15 is fitted to the walls 6 of. the bottle cap 1 by means of a threaded junction or by means of a friction contact. Ribbed elevations 14 are provided on the top of the receptacle .cap 15 for grasping in removing the said receptacle cap 15.

Surrounding the isolated receptacle chamber 5 is a metal cup or,other hard support 7 which is designed to prevent collapse or other distortion of the receptacle chamber 5 when the bottle cap 1 is forced into the opening of the bottle '2. Such a metal cup is provided with an opening in its bottom to allow passage of a hypodermic needle 8 through the bottomiof' the bottlecap 1 into the interior of the bottle 2. I

Figure 5 is a longitudinal sectional view of the needle 8 :showing the relative positions of the openings in the shank of said needle 8. A flanged opening 12 is situated below a round opening 13. When fluid from an outside source is directed through the needle 8, a portion of the fluid escapes through the flanged opening 12 into the receptacle chamber 5. As fluid accumulates in the receptacle chamber 5 the increased air pressure escapes through the round opening 13 into the interior of the bottle 2. After the receptacle chamber 5 is filled with fluid, the bottle 2 continues to fill to its desired volume.

.From the foregoing detailed descriptions it can be readily seen that this device shows particular utility in the use .of conventional blood donor units, however, it should be understood that the principle of the present invention can be incorporated in any procedure demanding separate isolation of a fluid sample of the same nature asthat contained in the larger container or receptacle.

Others may practice the invention in any of the numerous ways which will be suggested to one skilled in the art upon a reading of this specification. It is intended that all such practice of' the invention be included hereunder provided it falls within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A closure for a parenteral liquid container comprising a body section having lateral walls, a bottom wall'having at least a portion of penetrable resealable material and an upper wall provided with a large diameter depression extending inwardly toward said bottom wall to provide a liquid retaining chamber, a chamber closure cap member sealably engaging the inner walls of said depression adjacent the upper edge thereof with at least a portion ofsaid cap member being of penetrable resealable material, and at least one small diameter passage extending upwardly from said bottom wall with the end thereof sealably closed by the said upper wall spaced laterally, from the said liquid retaining chamber, the

7 said upper 'wall sealing the end of said passage being readily penetrable to provide a fluid outlet, passage for said parenteral liquid container.

2. A method for simultaneously filling the closure of claim 1 and a container sealed by said closure comprising the steps of inserting a hollow closure piercing needle having at least two longitudinally spaced openings in the shank thereof through the bottle closure, the outlet tip of said needle extending into the interior of said container and the longitudinally spaced openings situated in the upper portion of the .liquid retaining chamber, connecting the hub of said needle which extends above the closure to a conduit leading to a fluid supply, and simultaneously filling both the liquid retaining chamber within the closure and the container sealed by said bottle closure.

3. A method for simultaneously filling the closure of claim 1 and the container sealed by said closure comprising the steps of inserting a hypodermic needle having a circular opening and a longitudinally spaced wedge opening in the shank thereof proximate to its hub, the outlet tip or" said needle extending into the interior of said container and the longitudinally spaced openings situated in the upper portion of the liquid retaining chamber, connecting the hub of said needle which extends above the closure to a conduit leading to a fluid supply, and simultaneously filling both the liquid retaining chamber within the closure and the container sealed by said bottle closure, thereafter removing the needle.

4. A closure for a parenteral liquid container comprising a resilient body section of penetrable resealable material'ha ving lateral walls, a bottom wall, and an upper wall provided with a large diameter depressionextending inwardly toward the said bottom wall 'to provide a liquid retaining chamber, a chamber closure cap member sealably engaging the inner walls of said depression adjacent the upper edge thereof with at least a portion of said cap member being of a penetrable resealable material, and two small diameter passages extending upwardly from said bottom wall with the ends thereof sealably closed by the .said upper wall spaced laterally from the said liquid retaining chamber, the said upper wall sealing the ends ofsaid passages being readily penetrable to provide a fluid outlet passage and an air inlet passage for said parenteral liquid container.

5. A closure as defined in claim 4 with the further provision that the chamber closure cap member is sealably engaged to the inner walls by threaded means and which chamber closure cap has elevatedgrasping means.

6. A method for simultaneously filling a hollow reservoir bottle closure and a fluid container sealed by said closure comprising the steps of inserting a hollow closure piercing needle with longitudinally spaced openings in the shank thereof through the resealable penetrable spaced top wall portion and bottom wall portion of a reservoir bottle closure having afluid-tight hollow chamber dispersed between said spaced top and bottom walls with the said spaced opening dispersed within the said hollow chamber, the outlet tip of said needle extending into the interior of the said container, connecting the hub of said needle which extends above the top wall of the said closure to a conduit leading to a fluid supply, and simultaneously filling both the said hollow chamber within the bottle closure through one of said spaced openings inthe said shank and the said fluid container sealed by said bottle closure.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,115,035 Morgan Apr. 26, 1938 2,289,677 Perelson July 14, 1942 2,313,483 Smith Mar. 9, 1943 2,653,607 Deans Sept. 29, 1953 FOREIGN PATENTS 526,734 Great Britain Sept. 24, 1940 558,998 7 Great Britain 'Jan. 31, 1944

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2115035 *Jun 16, 1937Apr 26, 1938Morgan Clifford VStopper
US2289677 *Sep 24, 1940Jul 14, 1942Harold N PerelsonRubber stopper
US2313483 *Jan 4, 1941Mar 9, 1943Smith Arthur EAmpoule
US2653607 *Sep 28, 1950Sep 29, 1953Ayerst Mckenna & HarrisonInjection apparatus
GB526734A * Title not available
GB558998A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4152269 *Feb 1, 1977May 1, 1979Warner-Lambert CompanyBlood and isolation and storage of serum; thioxotropic barriers
US4177938 *Jun 30, 1977Dec 11, 1979Brina Guido JContainer with mixing cartridge
US4187893 *Jul 19, 1978Feb 12, 1980Abbott LaboratoriesCombined additive and administration port for a container
US4325368 *Dec 14, 1979Apr 20, 1982Ingrid BernardInfusion device
US4919658 *Jun 3, 1988Apr 24, 1990Institute Municipal D'assistencia SanitariaConnection for catheters, perfusion units and flasks of liquid to be perfused
US4941517 *Oct 20, 1988Jul 17, 1990Galloway TrustAseptic fluid transfer apparatus and methods
US4955861 *Apr 21, 1988Sep 11, 1990Therex Corp.Dual access infusion and monitoring system
US5086813 *Jun 7, 1990Feb 11, 1992Galloway Edwin JAseptic fluid transfer methods
US5199473 *Nov 4, 1991Apr 6, 1993Galloway TrustAseptic fluid transfer apparatus and methods
US5269350 *Mar 30, 1993Dec 14, 1993Galloway CompanyAseptic fluid transfer apparatus and methods
US5343900 *May 18, 1993Sep 6, 1994Galloway CompanyNeedle bundle driver and methods
US5364387 *Aug 2, 1993Nov 15, 1994Becton, Dickinson And CompanyDrug access assembly for vials and ampules
US6210378 *Aug 6, 1999Apr 3, 2001Teruo OuchiTreatment accessory for an endoscope
WO1983000932A1 *Aug 31, 1982Mar 17, 1983Beckman Instruments IncReagent storage and delivery system
Classifications
U.S. Classification215/247, 604/411, 215/6, 215/309, 600/577, 215/364, 220/521
International ClassificationA61M5/14, A61M5/162
Cooperative ClassificationA61M5/162
European ClassificationA61M5/162