Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2911128 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 3, 1959
Filing dateOct 7, 1952
Priority dateOct 22, 1951
Publication numberUS 2911128 A, US 2911128A, US-A-2911128, US2911128 A, US2911128A
InventorsAdam Krautkramer
Original AssigneeAdam Krautkramer
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spout and cap for a container
US 2911128 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 3, 1959 KRAUTKRKMER 2,911,128

SPOUT AND CAP FOR A CONTAINER Filed Oct. 7, 1952 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Nov. 3, 1959 A. KRAUTKRKMER 2,911,128

SPOUT AND CAP FOR A CONTAINER Filed Oct. '7, 1952 2 SheetsSheet 2 /n van/or dda'm vWrau/A ram:

United States PatentO SPOUT AND CAP FOR A CONTAINER Adam Krautkrfimer, Budenheim (Rhine), Germany Application October 7, 1952, Serial No. 313,387 Claims priority, application Germany October 22, 1951 6 Claims. (Cl. ZZZ- 543) This invention relates to a closure for containers, more particularly to such closures which while in their closing position permit a partial emptying of the containers.

Tubes, cans, canisters, barrels, carboys, bottles, and

7 similar containers are provided with closures to close the container opening for transportation and storage but also to permit an occasional partial removal of the contents. Such closures usually consist ofa discharge nozzle as in the case of containers or tubes for lighter fluid, of screw caps for cans, of lids for barrels and drums, of stoppers for bottles, etc.

Aside from stoppers, the known closures are mostly made from the same material as the container proper. Their application requires the use of packing material and often several operations, all of which causes relatively high costs.

Screw caps or stoppers when used for partial discharges of the contents are frequently lost.

The known closures do not guarantee the contents of the container to be fully delivered.

The primary object of my invention is to overcome all of the shortcomings of the conventional closures of the type referred to.

To the accomplishment of this object and other more detailed objects which will become clear hereinafter, my invention consists in a closure for containers, its elements, and the relation of these elements one to the other, as are more particularly described in the specification and sought to be defined in the claims.

The specification is accompanied by drawings in which:

Fig. 1 is a partially sectioned side elevation of the upper part of a container and of its closure in closing position, the closure being a discharge nozzle according to the present invention;

Fig. 2 shows the cap of the discharge nozzle of Fig. 1 as a separate part;

Fig. '3 is a sectioned side elevation of a can closure embodying features of a modified closure;

Fig. .4 is a plan view of the closure of Fig. 3, the cap being omitted;

Fig. 5 is a sectioned side elevation of another modification of a can closure;

Fig. 6 is a partially sectioned side elevation of a further modification of a can closure; and

Fig. 7 is a sectioned side elevation of a bottle closure according to the invention.

The discharge nozzle 1 of a container 2 is made from a material, such as synthetic resins or other synthetic material, acid resistant rubber (Buna), etc., that can be deformed under pressure and will resume the original shape when the pressure is released. The lower end of the discharge nozzle 1 comprises a rooflike flanged section 3, a collar 5, and a constricted section 4 between 3 and 5.

The opening in the container top 6 is surrounded by an angularly provided flanged rim 7 which snaps into the depression or constriction 4 when the discharge nozzle is set in place. The flanged rim 7 is firmly held 2,911,128 Patented Nov. 3, 1959 ice . cut off in a known manner.

The discharge nozzle is closed by a cap 9 which is preferably made from the same material as the discharge nozzle and is firmly connected by means of a thin resilient rod 10 with the lower end of the nozzle, for instance, the flanged section 3. Thus, the cap may be temporarily removed without danger of loss and without rendering the putting in place and the taking ofi diflicult.

The connection rod 10a may form a ring 11 at its lower free end, as shown in Fig. 2, which ring is clamped fast between the flange 3 and the container top 6 when the nozzle is set in place.

Upon filling the container 2, the lower end of the nozzle 1 is obliquely introduced into the opening in the container top 6, and by applying pressure centrally, the

' collar 5 is completely forced into the opening whereupon the rim 7 snaps into the depression or groove 4 of the nozzle. 7

In the embodiment of the invention shown in Fig. 3,

the closure illustrated being suitable for cans, drums and opening of the body 12 is closed by athin, easily destructible wall 13, such as a tearing membrane. The membrane is conveniently provided with a tearing flap 14.

The cap 9 is integrally connected with the flange 3" by means of the elastic rod 10'.

From Fig. 3 it will be seen that the flange 3' of the closure body 12 is both upwardly and inwardly relieved to form the constriction 4'. The flange 3' inclines, therefore, in a downward direction. When the closure is installed and the offset flange 7 snaps into the constriction, the flange 3, due to its downward inclination and the greater pressure thus exerted on the container top 6, will ensure a particularly tight seal, this seal being effected besides the seal effected by the flange 7 and the constriction 4'.

In the embodiment shown in Fig. 5, the cap 9" is secured to the body 12" by means of the threading 15. The rod 10", at one end, is integrally connected to the flange 3", and at its other end it is. fastened by means 3 7 9b is integrally connected with the body 12b by means of a resilient strip 10b. The cap 9b is provided on its bottom with a thin tearing strap 18 which, in the sealed condition, is cemented to the body 12b. The tearing is preferably equipped with a tearing membrane cor-' responding to those shown in Figs. 3 and 4, and with a cap 9c carrying a connecting rod 10c.

It is believed that the construction and handling of my container closure, and the many advantages thereof, will be understood from the foregoing detailed description thereof.

Some of the features and advantages of the closure of i the invention are reviewed hereinafter.

The closure is made from a material of limited elasticity, preferably materials ba'sed'on synthetic resins or acid resistant rubber. The body of the closure is provided near its lower end with an external depression or groove extending around the circumference of the body, and a flange adjacent to and above said groove. The very end of the body is suitably shaped to facilitate the introduction of the body into the container and to make it possible for the opening-confining edge to snap into the groove, whereby the said flange of the body presses against the container top.

.For containers with a neck, such as bottles, the closure of my invention assumes an inversed form inasmuch as the body is provided near its lower end with an internal groove which receives under tension, when the closure is forced over the neck, a corresponding protrusion provided on the bottle neck.

The cap which closes the closure body is secured thereto, preferably to the lower end of the body, by means of an elastic connection which prevents the loss of the cap without interfering with occasional temporary removals of the cap, as is required for partial emptying of the container.

The closure of the invention has important advantages over the conventional constructions. The container is filled through its opening, whereupon the closure is forced into place. The closure locks itself in position and closes the opening tight to air and liquid, this being due to the inherent tension of the closure.

The opening of the closure is closed by a tearing membrane which guarantees genuineness of the contents of the container. The closure opening, after a partial discharge of the contents of the container, is closed by an ordinary capor a screw cap. Either cap is permanently connected to the body of the closure and cannot be lost.

Undesirab le effects of the conventional cork closures for bottles are avoided due to the use of chemically inert material.

The closure of the invention can be produced at low cost. It does not require special designs of the container opening, and it can be installed 'without the use of tools or fixtures.

It will be apparent that while I have shown and described my invention in a few forms only, many changes and modifications may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention defined in the following claims.

I claim:

1. In combination with a container having a substantially flat top provided with an opening, the wall of said opening having a depending relatively short flanged rim, a closure comprising a resilient discharge tubular body, said tubular body having a narrow discharge outlet and an integral enlarged portion below said outlet and receivable in said opening, said enlarged portion including a lateral peripheral flange at its upper end and a depending substantially frusto-conical skirt of smaller external diameter than said lateral flange, said skirt having its outer surface at the juncture of the lateral flange therewith forrned-with an annular recess shaped to receive said flanged rim, the portion of said skirt below said recess constituting a collar of greater external diameter than said opening, and said collar terminating in a substantially mushroom-shaped lower end so as to facilitate insertion of the skirt through the top opening, said lateral flange being in overlapping engagement with the top of the container, said flanged rim being snapped into sealing engagement with said recess. when the closure is inserted through the opening in said top, and the collar of said skirt being exposed within the container and of substantially greater length than said recess and said 2. The combination of a closure and container as set 4 forth in claim 1 wherein the discharge outlet of said tubular body is closed by a hollow cap, said cap being integrally connected with the flange of said tubular body by means of a resilient link.

3. A spout for a container adapted to be attached to a wall thereof and extend outwardly through an opening therein comprising, a spout base of plastic material adapted to extend through said opening and including an inner end, and outer plastic flange integral with said base' and adapted to bear against an outer surface portion of said wall adjacent to said opening and make sealing contact therewith, and an inner plastic flange integral with said base and adapted to bear against an inner surface portion of said wall adjacent to said opening and make sealing contact therewith, the inner and outer flanges each adapted to cover an area greater than that of said opening so as to embrace the wall portion defining the opening, the inner flange being of small width to provide a step construction and the outer flange being adapted to cover a relatively large area of said wall portion surrounding said area, the spout base being tapered in a portion extending inwardly from adjacent to said inner flange to said inner end to aid in inserting said base into said opening, the extreme inner end of the spout having a diameter less than that of said opening, the portion of the spout between said flanges being relatively thick in comparison to the thickness of said tapered portion in order to aid in preventing accidental inward distortion thereof.

4. A container, comprising, a wall having an opening defined by an inwardly turned wall portion, and a spout positioned in said opening including a spout base of plastic material extending through said opening and including an inner end, an outer plastic flange integral with said base and bearing against an outer surface of the wall adjacent to said inwardly turned wall portion and in sealing contact therewith, and in inner plastic flange integral with said base and bearing against the inner edge of said inwardly turned wall portion, the inner flange being of small width to provide a step construction and said inwardly turned wall portion being located between said flanges, the spout base being tapered in a portion extending inwardly from adjacent to said inner flange to said inner end to aid in inserting said base into said opening, the extreme inner end of the spout having a diameter less than that of said opening, the portion of the spout between said flanges being relatively thick in comparison to the thickness of said tapered portion in order to aid in preventing accidental inward distortion thereof.

5. A spout for a container adapted to be attached to a wall thereof and extend outwardly through an opening therein comprising, a spout base of plastic material adapted to extend through said opening and including an inner end, an outer plastic flange integral with said base and adapted to bear against an outer surface portion of said Wall adjacent to said opening and make sealing contact therewith, and an inner plastic flange integral with said base and adapted to bear against an inner surface portion of said wall adjacent to said opening and make sealing contact'therewith, the inner and out flanges each adapted to cover an area greater than that of said opening was to embrace the wall portion defining the opening, the spout base being tapered in a portion extending inwardly from adjacent to said inner flange to said inner end to aid in inserting said base into said opening, the extreme inner end of the spout having a diameter less than that of said opening, and a closure for the outer end of said spout secured to said outer flanges.

6. A container, comprising, a "wall having an opening defined by an inwardly turned substantially cylindrical wall portion, and a spout positioned in said opening including a spout base of plastic material extending through said opening and including an inner end, an outer plastic flange integral with said base and bearing against an outer surface ofthe wall adjacent to said inbeing tapered in a portion extending inwardly from adjacent to said inner flange to said inner end to aid in inserting said base into said opening, the extreme inner end of the spout having a diameter less than that of said opening, the portion of the spout between said flanges being relatively thick in comparison to the thickness of said tapered portion in order to aid in preventing accidental inward distortion thereof, the outer flange having an extreme outer edge tapered rearwardly toward the 15 inner end of the spout, and a closure for the outer end of said spout secured to said outer flange.

UNITED STATES PATENTS Ford Feb. 3, Kaye Aug. 29, Bailey Nov. 2, Temple Mar. 28, Battersby Mar. 3, Allen Mar. 2, Miller Aug. 31, Tupper Oct. 5, Stewart May 21,

FOREIGN PATENTS Germany Mar. 20, France Sept. 19,

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1329590 *Apr 14, 1916Feb 3, 1920Ford BruceSecondary or storage battery
US1924242 *Jul 30, 1932Aug 29, 1933Kaye John WClosure cap securing device for containers
US2098128 *Sep 11, 1936Nov 2, 1937Bailey Clarence MRubber oil can spout
US2152001 *Apr 7, 1938Mar 28, 1939Victor Metal Products CorpCollapsible tube and cap therefor
US2630238 *May 9, 1949Mar 3, 1953Pm Ind IncTear out closure
US2670885 *Feb 9, 1950Mar 2, 1954Allen Chester SPlastic spout for liquid containers
US2687831 *Jul 19, 1949Aug 31, 1954Formold Plastics IncDispensing spout equipped container
US2690861 *May 8, 1950Oct 5, 1954Earl S TupperDispensing closure
US2792976 *Jun 3, 1955May 21, 1957Hall StewartContainer and spout therefor
DE834509C *Jun 23, 1950Mar 20, 1952Eugene GuinetVerschlusskapsel
FR998208A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2981449 *Oct 31, 1957Apr 25, 1961Rutland Fire Clay CompanyCaulking compound cartridge with improved spout
US3029988 *Jan 18, 1957Apr 17, 1962Crown Cork & Seal CoPouring spout for a container
US3042271 *Jul 30, 1959Jul 3, 1962Hedwin CorpContainer with retractable projectable spout
US3101878 *Feb 28, 1961Aug 27, 1963American Flange & MfgClosure assembly for containers and parts thereof
US3122287 *Nov 14, 1960Feb 25, 1964American Can CoDispensing container having a spout with separable attaching means therefor
US3131870 *Jan 17, 1962May 5, 1964Continental Can CoSpray nozzle with tethered closure
US3152730 *Jan 12, 1962Oct 13, 1964Hamilton Skotch CorpDispensing and discharge device
US3172569 *Feb 16, 1962Mar 9, 1965Wolford William ECollapsible tube dispenser
US3270924 *Sep 17, 1964Sep 6, 1966Seiichi KitabayashiMounting caps for aerosol dispenser
US3282478 *Dec 9, 1964Nov 1, 1966Keith Russell JohnCaptive closure cap
US3465917 *Mar 31, 1967Sep 9, 1969Taisei Kako CoMethod for the production of plastic tubes
US3495746 *Oct 30, 1967Feb 17, 1970American Flange & MfgPlastic closures for containers and combinations
US4392590 *Nov 10, 1980Jul 12, 1983Basotherm GmbhEye drop dispensing bottle
US4674640 *Mar 24, 1986Jun 23, 1987Maurice AsaCap structure for a centrifuge tube
US4974757 *Nov 16, 1989Dec 4, 1990Brotz Gregory RDispenser
US6732773Jun 18, 2002May 11, 2004Playtex Products, Inc.Cover assembly for use with a breast milk storage system
US8245870Mar 18, 2009Aug 21, 2012Rubbermaid IncorporatedContainer cap with tether
US8926840Dec 23, 2010Jan 6, 2015Rubbermaid IncorporatedDrinking container and filter assembly
US20090139598 *Nov 29, 2007Jun 4, 2009New England Die Cutting, Inc.Cover assembly
US20090236341 *Mar 18, 2009Sep 24, 2009Rubbermaid Inc.Container Cap with Tether
US20110062159 *Sep 11, 2009Mar 17, 2011Ajit KhubaniBeverage container closure with pressure release
US20130341365 *May 2, 2013Dec 26, 2013Patrick C. RyanMultiport valved dispenser for toothpaste and the like
USD613599Sep 11, 2009Apr 13, 2010Telebrands Corp.Beverage container closure with pressure release
WO1993003973A1 *Aug 26, 1992Mar 4, 1993Gregory WarnerA container cap
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/543, 215/306, 222/541.1, 222/569, 222/541.2
International ClassificationB65D47/12, B65D47/06, B65D47/14, B65D47/18
Cooperative ClassificationB65D47/14, B65D47/18
European ClassificationB65D47/14, B65D47/18