Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2911632 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 3, 1959
Filing dateMay 3, 1955
Priority dateMay 3, 1955
Publication numberUS 2911632 A, US 2911632A, US-A-2911632, US2911632 A, US2911632A
InventorsLevine Bernard, Frederick B Maclaren
Original AssigneeUnited Aircraft Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Telemetric position transmitter
US 2911632 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 3, 1959 LEVlNE ErAL TELEMETRIC POSITION TRANSMITTER 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed May 3, 1955 N 5M Y E m NV 0. R fim o m B A 4 2 N E W. umijusi 0Q 2522: N v 0 I Q Q ooooooooooooooogoomooooo o oooobpooooooooooooooboooooooooo b w w 7 v cm \Pf A 23.. g4 3 INVENTORS Z EV/A/E Madam-w Nov. 3, 1959 LEVlNE ETAL- TELEMETRIC POSITION TRANSMITTER 2 Sheets-Shet 2 "III!!! Filed May 3, 1955 BEEN/4R0 Fe f r y \\\\\\\\\v\ \\\\u J is. Jr/ N \N II I EDEP/CK B.

A TORNEY United States Patent TELEMETRIC POSITION TRANSMITTER B'ernard Levine, 'Malverne, and Frederick H. MacLaren,

New. Yrk,.fN.Y., assignors, by' mesne assignments, to nited-Aircraft Corporation, EastLHartfprd, Guam, :1

Our invention relates to a telemetric position transmitte'r and more particularly to a device for indicating 'the position of a remoteor inaccessible.variablerposijtionable means in-a simple, convenient, accurate and .reliable manner.

.Telemetric devices and systems are well-known to the art. Most of them are cumbersome,-expensiveandinaccurate, largely because they depend upon measuring absolute voltages as a function of'distance. Voltage control'devices are frequently expensive to manufacture, .d-i fficuit tomaintain and unreliable in operation.

One objectof our invention is to provide a.- sensing means or transmitter which -willindicate .the position of a device at a location remote from that occupied by the device which is accurate in operation and simple in construction.

Another object of our invention is to provide a tele- .metric position transmitter which requires no voltage regulator owing to the fact that it is insensitive to variations in line voltage.

v A furtherobject of our invention is to provide an alternating current telemetric transmitter i which will maintain its accuracy irrespective of changes in frequency. f A further object of ourinvention is to provide -a telemetric position transmitter which *may be placed "either-within or without. a-pressure wall and "which will sense on the unpressured side of-a=-pressure wall "changes "in: position ofmeans inside the: pressure wall. 7

Other and further objects ofour invention will appear z'fro'm the following description. I r

In :generaL'ourinVentiOn contemplates thesprovision -of:a linearly moving magnetic field positioned along the locus of the movement of the 'device'whoseivposition is to be sensed or measured. The field is created by *polyphasewvindingsformedof a plurality of field'coils. The coil widths and spacing i-are suchthat a "moving --magnetic 'field will be 'produced whose field strength changes uniformly from one endr of'the winding :tothe other. Adjacent the field we provide: a screening or "search coil adapted to be cut byfl ines fofzmagnetic force tofthe moving field. Ordinarilyfthe voltage i'generated racross the search coil will integrate to ."zero. To "the :means whose'posi'tioir is to' be sensed, we attach a piece of high permeability material adapted to concentrate the flux from the magnetic fieldfat the position occupied iby the magnetic material. .If desired, W6 mayposition a fshort-circuitedi turn to thenieans .whose'fposition is 101368611866 in order to produce a discontinuous point in the magnetic field, either by increasing or decreas- Ping Fthezfiux density 01" shifting'itsmhase at-this point. In this manner weproduce a voltage change in the search coil. We are thus enabled toproduce a voltage inthescreening coil which is afunction of the position :of a magnetic linkingrnaterial alongthe locus of its movement. Where the poles are relatively close to each other,; the voltage produced will be relatively low rower thanthe set of coils-34at-the other endoflthefield -;as.compared to the position where the poles arespaced 2.911.632 Patented Nov. 1959 ICE] junction therewith and in which like reference numerals aroused to indicate likeparts-in the various views: Figure 1 is a diagrammatic view-of -at'eleme'tric :sys tem containing one embodiment of our invention.

- Figure 2 is a cross-sectional View of a telemetric transmitter constructed to sense within a pressure wall the movement of a means outside a pressure wall.

Figure 3 is a view siniilar to Figure 2 showing-our telemetric transmitter positioned outside of a pressure wall, arranged to detect the movement-ofa device inside apressurewall. e

More particularly referring fnow to Figure 1. we-provide a plurality of field coils of -a -polyphase winding.

' The coilsf2, :4, 6, 8 an'dlt] are alternately woundand connected in series.

The arrangement of} thiswinding is such that the polarity ofl'thefield of -Winding created by an exciting current were nort h the polarity of winding 4 would be south,- thepola ty of winding 6 would be'north, the polarity o'f winding 8"would be south and the'polari-ty of winding It} would be-north. The second set of coils of the two-phase field 'winding,

indicated generally by the reference numeral 1, comprises coils 3,5, 7, 9 and-11. 'This' set' of coils swears 'similar to the-first set of co ils;"that is to say, co il"3 is similar tocoil 12, coil *S-is similart'o coil 4, coil is similar to boil 6, coil'9 is similar to coil .3 and 'coil'fi is similar to coil 19. It is to be understood that,' while we have shown a. two-phase winding, a three-phase or any other appropriate polyphase fwinding may be ;em-

ployed. If this. winding were on a conventional induction motor stator, it Woul'dfproduce a rotating magnetic field. The winding, however, is linearlydisp'osed along the locus of movement "o'f'ithe devicemhose position is to be sensed. The: set of coilsf3, 5,17, '9 andllar'e connected across conductors'ldanddfi, whichare supplied with an alternating potential. from *an alternator T8. 'The voltage-impressed across coijls f2, '4, 6,13 and it) from conductors 2t}, and 14 isphase shifted ninety degrees by capacitor 22, or by otherjsuitable phase- .shifting means. it is --tobe understood, of courser'that;

ifdesired, .two alter-nators 'may- "De-employed; whose voltages are ninety. degrees apart, to excite the twophase winding 1. .If-a three-phase winding is -usefd, it will be understood that .any appropriate three phase potentialsource may be employedtoexcite the field windings.

The coils are of va-ryingwidth, ascan readily beseen by reference-to Figures .2. and '3. .In these views,..the setof coilsSZ-at. one endof the winding .is-..much-.nar-

winding. 'The field windings definethe polesalong which the magnetic .fieldtravels. .The field will traversea ldistance from pole to pole inxprecisely the .sameincrement of time, depending .onthe frequency of theexcitingcur- .rent. Theefiect of the varying width ofthe sets of coils is to vary the interpo le spacing orpolep'itoh'. -The vary- .ing pole pitch produces afield whose .strengthwillvary -as a :functionof linear-position alongthefield. Referring tance between. the setof windings 32 and the adjacent set ofwindings38.

As has beenexplained hereinabove; the field strength varies along theover-all length. of the windingrnadegup ing manner.

the length of the winding including all the coils.

. 3 of coils 1 to 11. This may be explained in the follow- As is known in the art, the field strength H of a uniformly wound solenoid having a length l, a diameter d, and a number of turns n per unit length may I be expressed by the relationship I 41TH where I is the current passing through the solenoid winding. If I is small with respect to d, as is the case with our individual coils as shown in the drawings, Equation 1 may be written as 4nIl (2) all length of the total winding in a direction from the set of coils 32 to the set of coils 34. I

It will be seen that the over-all winding including all the coils 2 to 11 includes a group of coils 2, 4, 6, 8, and separated in space phase by ninety degrees from the group of coils 3, 5, 7, 9, and 11. If these groups of coils both were energized from a single phase source, possible ambiguities would result since the resulting field strengthenvelope would pass through zero at points along To avoid this result, we apply two electrical signals having a time phase difference of ninety degrees to the respective groups of coils in a manner to be described hereinafter. The result of this action is a continuous field strength envelope which varies linearly along the length of the over-all winding.

To accomplish this measuring of the strength of the field, we provide a screening or search coil 40 positioned adjacent the synchronous field windings. Ordinarily, the integral of the voltages generated in the search coil 40 by the moving magnetic field along the search coil will integrate to zero. We attach a member 42 formed of high permeability material by any appropriate nonmagnetic means 44 to the device whose position is to be measured. For example, the search coil 40 may represent an elevator shaft of a building. The high permeability material member 42 may be attached by member 44 to a screw which is driven from the hoisting machine which moves the elevator car (not shown since it is well known to the art). In this manner the position of the member 42 will indicate the position of the car. The member 42 is positioned so as to concentrate flux from the field coils in the search or screening coil 40. In this manner, the field adjacent the magnetic material will be stronger than at any other part of the field windings and a voltage will be induced in that part of the search coil adjacent the magnetic material. It will be clear that a voltage will be produced which is a function of the position of the member 42 which is attached to the device whose position is to be sensed or measured. It

is not necessary that the field strength variation with length be uniform since the measuring or metering device can be calibrated linearly. For example, a voltmeter 46 may be connected across the search coil 40-and calibrated as a function of distance. Ordinarily, the accuracy of calibration will be suificient for many purposes.

In order to measure the position of the permeable member 42 more accurately, a winding 50 of an induction potentiometer, indicated generally by the reference numeral 53, has one of its terminals connected to a terminal of alternator 18 by conductors 16 and 52 and has its other terminal connected to the terminal of coil 11 which is'remote from that terminal of coil 11 which is connected to coil 9. The winding 50 is adapted to be inductively coupled with the rotatably mounted winding 54 of the potentiometer 53 to produce a voltage which is a function of the angle between winding 54 and winding 50. One terminal of Winding 54 is connected by conductor 56 to one terminal of screening winding 40. The other terminal of winding 54 is connected by conductor 58 to one terminal of the input of a magnetic amplifier, indicated generally by the reference numeral 60. The other terminal of the screening winding 40 is connected by conductor 62 to the other terminal of the input to the magnetic amplifier. It will be seen that the algebraic sum of the voltages across screening coil and across rotatable coil 54 constitute thecontrol input to the magnetic amplifier. The magnetic amplifierisfsupplied with an alternating potential from the alternator 18 through conductors 64 and 66 and conductors 68 and 70, as can readily be seen by reference to Figure 1. The rotor 72 of a twophase motor, indicated generally by the reference numeral 74, is mechanically connected by a shaft 76 to drive both the rotating coil 54 and the pointer 78 of a metering dial 80} It will readily be 'understood that a gear box 77 may be positioned between the motor rotor 72 and the shaft 76. One field winding 82 of the two-phase motor is excited from the alternator through conductors 84 and 86 connected to conductors 64 and 66. The output of the magnetic amplifier represents the algebraic sum of the opposing voltages in Totatable coil 54 and screening coil 40. This is impressed across the other field winding 88 of the two-phase synchronous motor 74 by means of conductors 90 and 92. It will be understood, of course, that the phase of the current in winding 88 is shifted ninety degrees from the phase of the current in winding 82. It will be observed, furthermore, that as long as there is a signal output from the magnetic amplifier, the two-phase motor will rotate in one direction or the other, depending upon the direction of the signal. The arrangement is such that the rotation of the rotor 72 of the two-phase motor will rotate the rotatable coil 54 to bring the signal to zero, thus driving the pointer 78 around the dial 80. The dial'80 is, of course, calibrated as a function of the position of the permeable member 42.

It will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that our telemetric system is insensitive to variations either in the voltage produced by the alternator '18 or its frequency. This follows from the fact that the potentiometer coil 50 is excited by the same potential source as are the field windings 1. Differences in line voltage and differences in frequency will be cancelled out owing to the fact that the two-phase motor is likewise excited from the same voltage source. our design is quite simple in that no expensive vacuum tubes or choppers are used. Any appropriate power source, such as a IIO-volt, 60-cycle alternating current line may be employed. Even though the frequency may vary plus or minus five percent and the voltage vary plus or minus ten percent, accurate results will beproduced from our system.

Owing to the magnetic linking between the field coils and the search coil, the highly permeable material may be placed inside or outside of a pressure wall. Referring now to Figure 2, the screening or search coil 40 and the field windings 1 are positioned inside of a pressurized tube or vessel 100. If desired, the search coil'may be positioned about a core of magnetic material 102 which will provide a more convenient return magnetic path for the magnetic flux. The member 42 of highly permeable material is attached to a nonmagnetic member 44 which surrounds the pressure wall 100.

Referring now to Figure 3, the field windings 1 .and the search coil 40 are positioned around the outside of a pressurized vessel or pressure wall 100. In this form of the invention, it is desired to sense the position of a member 104 within the pressurized wall 100. In this case the member 104 carries the member of highly permeable material 42 inside of the pressurized wall 100.

In operation, as the member whose position is to be It will also be observed that sensed moves, it will carry the highly permeable member 42 back and forth along the linearly moving magnetic field, thus coupling the magnetic flux from the field windings adjacent the permeable member with the search windings and inducing a voltage in the search windings as a function of the position of the highly permeable material. The voltage induced is proportional to field strength and the field speed. This voltage will vary, depending upon its position, owing to the fact that the pole pitch of the field windings progressively varies along the field. The voltage induced across search coil 40 is opposed by the voltage induced in the rotating coil 54 of the potentiometer 53. The algebraic sum of these voltages constitutes the input signal to the magnetic amplifier. It is to be understood, of course, that any other appropriate amplifier may be used, if desired. The output of the magnetic amplifier is impressed across one winding of the field of the two-phase motor 74. The arrangement is such that the two-phase motor will drive the rotating coil 54 and reduce the input to the magnetic amplifier to zero. At the zero point, the pointer 78 will measure the linear position of the member 42 upon the dial.

It will be seen that we have accomplished the objects of our invention. We have provided a sensing means or transmitter which will indicate the position of a device at a location remote from that occupied by the device which is accurate in operation and simple in construcv tion. Our telemetric position indicator requires no voltage regulator owing to the fact that it is insensitive to variations in line voltage. The accuracy of our telemetric position transmitter does not vary with changes in frequency of the line current. The construction of our telemetric position transmitter is such that it may be placed either within or without a pressure wall and will sense on the unpressured side of the pressure wall changes in position of means inside of the pressure wall.

It will be understood that certain features and subcombinations are of utility and may be employed without reference to other features and subcombinations. This is contemplated by and is within the scope of our claims. It is further obvious that various changes may be made in details within the scope of our'claims without departing firom the spirit of our invention. It is therefore to be understood that our invention is not to be limited to the specific details shown and described.

Having thus described our invention, what we claim is:

1. A telemetric position transmitter including in combination a polyphase field winding having a plurality of coils adapted to define magnetic poles when the winding is energized, the winding width of said coils varying progressively from one terminal of the field winding to the other to provide a varying pole pitch whereby the moving magnetic field created by the polyphase winding when energized has a strength which varies progressively along the length of said field winding, a search coil positioned adjacent to and substantially coextensive with said field winding, a movable flux varying member locally positioned adjacent said search coil adapted to vary magnetic flux from said field winding in said search coil in a small predetermined area and means for moving said flux varying member.

2. A telemetric position transmitter as in claim 1 in which said polyphase field winding comprises two sets of coils at each pole position.

3. A telemetric position transmitter as in claim 1 in which said means for moving the flux varying member is connected to an object whose position is to be sensed.

4. A telemetric position transmitter as in claim 1 including a voltmeter connected across said search coil.

5. A telemetric position transmitter including in combination a polyphase field winding having a plurality of coils adapted to define magnetic poles when the winding is energized, a source of polyphase alternating potential for energizing said field winding, the winding width of the coils of said field varying progressively from one terminal of the field winding to the other to provide a varying pole pitch whereby the moving magnetic field created by the energization of the polyphase winding has a strength which varies progressively along the length of said field Winding, a search coil positioned adjacent to and substantially coextensive with the field winding, a movable highly permeable member locally positioned adjacent said search coil adapted to concentrate magnetic flux from the field winding in the search coil in a small-predetermined area, a potentiometer having a stationary coil and a rotating coil, means for energizing sm'd potentiometer stationary coil from one of the phases of said polyphase alternating potential, circuit means for algebraically summing the potentials generated in said potentiometer rotating coil and in said search coil, means for controlling a synchronous motor from the sum of said potentials and means responsive to the output of said synchronous motor for rotating said potentiometer rotatable coil to a position to bring said potential sum to zero.

6. A telemetric position transmitter as in claim 5 in which said synchronous motor is a two-phase motor and means for energizing one phase of the field winding of said motor from one phase of said alternating polyphase potential.

7. A telemetric position transmitter as in claim 5 in which said potential sum is amplified.

8. A telemetric position transmitter as in claim 5 including in combination means responsive to the rotation of said potentiometer rotatable coil for indicating the position of said highly permeable member.

9. A telemetric position transmitter including in combination a linearly extending polyphase field winding having a plurality of coils adapted to define magnetic poles when the winding is energized, the winding width of said coils varying progressively from one terminal of the field winding to the other to provide a varying pole pitch whereby the moving magnetic field created by the polyphase winding when energized has a strength which linearly and progressively varies along the length of the field winding, a search coil positioned adjacent to and substantially coextensive with said field winding, a movable flux varying member locally positioned adjacent said search coil adapted to vary magnetic flux from the field winding in a small predetermined area of the search coil whereby to induce a voltage in said search coil as a function of the linear position of said flux varying member along said field winding, means for balancing the potential induced in said search coil and means responsive to said balancing means for indicating the linear position of said movable flux varying member.

10. A telemetric position transmitter as in claim 9 in which said flux varying member comprises an element formed of highly permeable material.

-11. A telemetric position transmitter as in claim 9 in which said flux varying member comprises a shortcircuited turn formed of conducting material.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,569,106 James Sept. 25, 1951

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2569106 *Jun 29, 1946Sep 25, 1951JamesPosition indicator
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3032754 *Nov 21, 1957May 1, 1962Westinghouse Electric CorpPosition indicator
US3054976 *Nov 18, 1958Sep 18, 1962Schaevitz EngineeringDifferential transformer
US3099830 *Apr 7, 1958Jul 30, 1963Gen Electric Co LtdElectrical apparatus for providing an indication of the relative positions of relatively movable means
US3138772 *May 28, 1959Jun 23, 1964Automatic Timing And ControlsSymmetrical differential transformers
US3296081 *Nov 21, 1960Jan 3, 1967Ronald WildgooseNuclear reactors
US3890607 *Jan 17, 1973Jun 17, 1975Merlin GerinElectromagnetic position indicator
US4229786 *Sep 19, 1978Oct 21, 1980Murata Manufacturing Co., Inc.Fly-back transformer with a low ringing ratio
US4282485 *May 22, 1978Aug 4, 1981Pneumo CorporationLinear variable phase transformer with constant magnitude output
US4297698 *Nov 2, 1977Oct 27, 1981Pneumo Corporation360 Degree linear variable phase transformer
US4406999 *Jul 2, 1981Sep 27, 1983Clarostat Mfg. Co., Inc.Inductive sensor
US4697144 *Apr 10, 1985Sep 29, 1987Verify Electronics LimitedPosition sensing apparatus
US4891590 *Jun 8, 1988Jan 2, 1990Unico, Inc.Linear resolver utilizing plural nulled coil sets
US4893077 *Mar 31, 1988Jan 9, 1990Auchterlonie Richard CAbsolute position sensor having multi-layer windings of different pitches providing respective indications of phase proportional to displacement
US4893078 *May 28, 1987Jan 9, 1990Auchterlonie Richard CAbsolute position sensing using sets of windings of different pitches providing respective indications of phase proportional to displacement
US5036275 *Oct 26, 1989Jul 30, 1991Nartron CorporationInductive coupling position sensor method and apparatus having primary and secondary windings parallel to each other
US5216364 *Jan 11, 1989Jun 1, 1993Nartron CorporationVariable transformer position sensor
US5432493 *Mar 4, 1994Jul 11, 1995Lucas Industries Public Limited CompanyTwo linear differential transformers with armature
US5619133 *Jun 6, 1995Apr 8, 1997Nartron CorporationSingle coil position and movement sensor having enhanced dynamic range
US5811967 *Dec 17, 1993Sep 22, 1998Nartron CorporationEGR valve linear position sensor having variable coupling transformer
US6356075 *Jun 18, 1997Mar 12, 2002Nartron CorporationPosition sensor system including voltage transfer function
US6418363Dec 29, 2000Jul 9, 2002Nartron CorporationVehicle suspension control system
US6470248Nov 30, 2001Oct 22, 2002Narton CorporationVehicle suspension control system
USRE31119 *Oct 19, 1981Jan 4, 1983Murata Mfg., Co. Ltd.Fly-back transformer with a low ringing ratio
DE2801203A1 *Jan 12, 1978Aug 10, 1978Pneumo CorpMesswertwandler zum umsetzen einer verschiebungs- in eine phasengroesse
DE2847258A1 *Oct 31, 1978May 3, 1979Pneumo CorpMesswertwandler zum umsetzen einer verschiebungs- in eine phasengroesse
DE2914195C2 *Apr 7, 1979Jul 9, 1987Mannesmann Rexroth Gmbh, 8770 Lohr, DeTitle not available
Classifications
U.S. Classification340/870.31, 336/136, 340/870.34, 318/657, 33/DIG.500, 318/687, 336/132
International ClassificationG01D5/243, G08B21/00, G01D5/06, H04N3/19
Cooperative ClassificationG08B21/00, H04N3/19, G01D5/06, Y10S33/05, G01D5/243
European ClassificationG08B21/00, G01D5/243, H04N3/19, G01D5/06