Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2912772 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 17, 1959
Filing dateApr 15, 1959
Priority dateApr 15, 1959
Publication numberUS 2912772 A, US 2912772A, US-A-2912772, US2912772 A, US2912772A
InventorsHarrison Schuyler G
Original AssigneeHarrison Schuyler G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe structure having molded basic units
US 2912772 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 17, 1959 s. G. HARRISON 2,912,772

SHOE STRUCTURE HAVING MOLDED BASIC UNITS Filed April 15, 1959 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Nov. 17, 1959 s. G. HARRISON 2,912,772

SHOE STRUCTURE HAVING MOLDED BASIC UNITS Filed April 15, 1959 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Nov.l7, 1959 v s. G. HARRISON 2,912,7 2

SHOE STRUCTURE HAVING MOLDED BASIC UNITS Filed April 15, 1959 U s Sheets-Sheet 3 W \xm 228 F/a/a gg 4 F/GZ 3? F/GZ/ United States Patent SHOE STRUCTURE HAVING MOLDED BASIC UNITS The present invention relates to shoes for men, women and children formed of assembled parts with those of major importance being molded from suitable material.

A general object of the present invention is to provide such shoe structures in-which a unitary basic shell unit is effectively molded from elastic and flexible material and has a full sole, and a molded heel and shank unit having relative rigidity and suitable load bearing characteristics upon which the shank and heel areas of the sole are efliciently anchored in a unique manner with the parts being few, easily and rapidly producible and simply assembled quickly to provide a structure easily converted to a variety of attractive styles of economical cost which are of excellent Wearing quality and give unusual comfort and protection.

A more specific object of the invention is to provide such a shoe structure of very few parts in which the shell basic unit is so interlocked upon the heel and shank stiffening unit as to assure unusually secure anchorage of the parts together attainable in a simple, ready and economical manner while eliminating costly procedures of the prior practices, the uppers of attractive and unique finished shoes embodying such parts having desirable flexibility and comfortable fitting qualities while the shank and heel structures thereof provide localized rigidity which assures stability and efficient load bearing strength without detracting from the comfort.

Another object of the invention is to provide embodiments of such a shoe structure in which a certain shell basic unit may without change be assembled with a variety of embodiments of the heel and shank basic unit to be embodied in various styles of shoes which not only differ in ornamental appearance but also in type as to the heights and forms of the heels and the cant and'shapes' of the shanks thereof.

A further object of the invention is to provide structural embodiments of the present shoe structure the parts of which can be speedily produced on an economical mass production basis and may be quickly and easily assembled without requiring experienced skill, so as to assure minimum labor costs, the finished shoes in no way suffering in quality and appearance from such production economies and in fact being superior in many respects as to unique attractiveness, long service life and comfortable fit in active wear.

Other objects of the invention will in part be obvious and will in part appear hereinafter.

The invention accordingly comprises the features of construction, combinations of elements, and arrangement of'parts, which will be exemplified in the constructions hereinafter set forth, and the scope of the invention will be indicated in the claims.

For a fuller understanding of the nature and objects of the invention reference should be had to the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. l is a perspective view of a shoe in which is in- 'corporated an embodiment of the present invention;v

ice

Fig. 2 is a side view of the embodiment shown in Fig. 1;

'Fig. 3 is an exploded perspective view of a shell basis unit of the Figs. 1 and 2 shoe construction and a vamp in the form of a toe cap which may be assembled therewith;

Fig. 4 is an exploded perspective view of the embodiment of the shoe structure of the present invention which is incorporated in the shoe construction of Figs. 1 and 2;

Fig. 5 is an enlarged longitudinal section, with parts broken away, and With a portion of the heel thereof shown in elevation, of the shoe construction shown in Figs. 1 and 2; I

Fig. 6 is a side perspective view of another shoe construction in which is incorporated a different embodiment of the shoe structure of the present invention;

Fig. 7 is an exploded view of the shoe construction shown in Fig. 6 with parts thereof being sectioned;

Fig. 8 is a transverse sectional view to enlarged scale taken substantially on a line at the point (8) indicated in Fig. 6;

Fig. 9 is a side elevational view of still another shoe construction embodying a different modification of the shoe structure of the present invention;

Fig. 10 is an exploded view of the parts of the shoe construction of Fig. 9 showing parts thereof in section;

Fig. 11 is a side elevational view of the unitary heel and shank basic unit shown in Fig. 9;

Fig. 12 is an exploded perspective view of the shell basic unit and the vamp toe cap of the shoe construction illustrated in Figs. 9 and 10;

Fig. 13 is an exploded perspective view of the shell basic unit and the heel and shank basic unit incorporated in the shoe construction of Figs. 9 and 10;

Fig. 14 is an enlarged longitudinal section, with parts broken away, showing the heel partly in elevation, of the shoe construction illustrated in Figs. 9 to 13 incl.;

Fig. 15 is a side elevational view of a modification of the shoe construction shown in Figs. 9 to 14 incl. employing a heel and shank basic unit having a heel of dif ferent height and form;

Fig. 16 is a side elevational view of a further modification of the shoe constructions shown in Figs. 9 to 14 incl. and in Fig. 15 employing a heel and shank basic unit having a heel of still different height and form;

Fig. 17 is an enlarged sectional detail of interfitting means embodied in a variation of the attachment of the vamp toe cap and the forepart sole of the shoeconstructions illustrated in Figs. 9 to 15 incL;

Fig. 18 is a longitudinal vertical section of a mold which is suitable for molding the shell basic unit of the Figs. 9 to 16 incl. embodiments, and depicting therein the latter;

Fig. 19 is a longitudinal vertical section of a mold which is suitable for molding the heel and shank basic unit of the shoe structures depicted in Figs. 1 to 14 incl., and depicting this basic unit therein;

Fig. 20 is a longitudinal vertical section of a mold which is suitable for molding the vamp toe cap of the Figs. 9 to 16 incl. embodiments, and depicting the toe cap therein;

Fig. 21 is a longitudinal vertical section of a mold which is suitable for molding the vamp toe cap of the Figs. 1 to 5 incl. embodiment, and depicting the toe cap; therein; and

Fig. 22 is a longitudinal vertical section of a mold which is suitable for molding the shell basic unit of the shoe construction illustrated in Figs. 1 to 5 incl., showing the shell unit therein.

Referring to the drawings, in which similar parts bear like numerals, it will be seen from Figs. 1 to 5 incl. that a shoe construction 25 which incorporates a shoe structure of the present invention includes the latter in the form of a sub-assembly consisting of a unitary molded" basic" shell unit 26 of elastic and flexible material and.

a. unitary molded basic heel and shank unit 27 of relatively rigid material. The shell unit 26 is suitably molded from material which has the pliability of leather conventionally employed in the uppers or vamps of various types of leather shoes, such as pumps, etc., and for this purpose may be molded from suitable elastic plastic, rubber-like composition such as synthetic rubber, or other materials having similar characteristics insofar as use in the present invention is concerned. For example, the shell may be molded from a suitable synthetic polymer composition which will give to the shell unit desired leather-like characteristics, being desirably molded from suitable polyvinyl chloride composition, plasticized, if desired, in which may be incorporated any suitable coloring or opaquing material, and may for the production of certain styles of shoe constructions be given a surface treatment to simulate certain types of conventionally employed leathers, such as suede. Such elastic plastic material which is employed in the molding of the shell unit 26 may be of the thermoplastic type and conventional molding apparatus and techniques may be employed in the production thereof.

The other basic unit of the shoe structure of the present invention in the form of the heel and shank unit 27 may, if desired, be molded as a unitary structure from suitable relatively rigid plastic, hard synthetic rubber composition, or other materials having similar rigidity and the strength to bear the weight of a person without undue deformation while giving adequate support to the instep. For this purpose, the heel and shank basic unit 27 may be molded from a suitable thermoplastic material having the desired rigidity after production, such, for example, as polystyrene, methyl methacrylate resin, and the like, in which may be incorporated, if desired, any suitable coloring or opaquing material.

The unitary molded basic shell unit 26 of elastic and flexible material comprises at least a full sole portion 28 which, as will be best seen from Figs. 3 and 5, has a heel bottom area 29, a forepart sole area 30 and an intervening shank area 31 merged with the heel bottom area and with the forepart sole area at a ballsupporting area 32. The basic shell unit 26 also includes an upstanding counter portion 33 which may be in a form to provide a full counter, suitably shaped to provide maximum comfort to the foot of the wearer, and merged with the sole portion heel area 29 along the sides and back thereof. The unitary molded basic shell unit 26 also has an upstanding vamp foxing 3 arranged marginally along the side edges of the shank area 31 of the full sole portion 28 to mergence with the counter portion 33, and also marginally along the side edges and the front edge of the forepart sole area 3d of the full sole portion. The vamp foxing 34 and the counter portion 33 provide a continuous upstanding side wall about the full sole portion 28 which not only gives adequate support to the sides of the feet along the arch and about the heel but also assures a measure of protection against wetness of the ground or pavement in bad weather while providing ready means of attachment of any suitable or desired additional uppers or vamp parts, such as a forepart toe vamp, straps, etc. As is illustrated by way of example in Figs. 1 to incl., such an additional uppers or vamp part may be in the form of a toe cap 35 which may be formed of any desired material such as flexible and elastic plastic, rubber-like composition, leather, fabric, etc. formed in any desired manner, such as by press shaping, to be attached to the shell unit 26 in any desired manner. For example, the vamp toe cap 35 may have side walls 36, 36 with the outer faces thereof lapped to the inner faces of the vamp foxing 34- or lapped to the outer faces thereof, and attached thereto by heat sealing or cementing, such as is indicated at 37 in Fig. 5, although other conventional anchoring means, such as stitching, nailing, etc. may be employed for this purpose.

In accordance with the present invention, the, bottom side of the full sole portion 28 of the unitary molded basic shell unit 26 is provided with an indented recess 38 extending from the vicinity of the back end of the heel area 29, such as at 39, forward through the shank area 3-1 to the vicinity of the ball-supporting area 32, such as to the point H with the marginal edges at the sides 41 and 42 and that at the back end at 39 spaced inwardly a relatively short distance, such as from about one-sixteenth of an inch to one-eighth of an inch defining a marginal depending flange in the heel bottom sole area. The transverse front end edge of the indented recess 38 at 4% is undercut to provide a locking groove, as will be best seen in Fig. 5. It will also be seen from Fig. 5 that at least the back end of the side wall of the recess 38 at 39 is also preferably undercut and, as will be understood from another embodiment of shoe construction in which is incorporated shoe structure of the present invention, illustrated in Figs. 6, 7 and 8, the sides of the recessed wall may also be similarly undercut, to assure a secure interlocking engagement between the basic shell unit 26 and the basic heel and shank unit 27. However, interlocking engagement of these two basic units 26 and 27 may be obtained in an embodiment where the side walls of the recess 33 along the sides of the shank area 31 and the heel area 29 are straight, i.e., are not undercut while the transverse front edge thereof at 40 preferably is under cut, the opposing side faces of the shank stiffening member and heel root land of the heel and shank unit 27 being shaped complemental thereto. These opposed faces of the recess and of the heel and shank unit are securely anchored together, such as by heat sealing or cementing as is graphically illustrated at 43 in Fig. 5.

The heel and shank basic unit 27 comprises a rigid heel 44 having a top portion 45 on which the heel bottom area 29 of the full sole portion 28 sets, and an elongated shaped shank stiffening member 47 extending forward from the heel top portion 45. The heel top portion 45 has a raised land 48 with the marginal back and side edges thereof 49 spaced inwardly from the back and side edges of the heel root portion, as Will be best seen in Fig. 4, thereby defining a marginal ledge 56] in the form of a depressed and lateral marginal outer side shoulder. It will also be seen from Figs. 4 and 5 that the top surface of the heel top portion land 48 is merged with the shaped top surface 51 of the shank stiffening member 47, with the land and merged shank stiffening member being shaped in outline complementary to the side walls of the recess 38. Accordingly, the transverse front end 52 of the shaped shank stiffening member 47 is tapered to fit into the transverse undercut groove at 40 which defines the front end of the recess 38, and the back end edge of the land 48 is shaped complementary to the undercut back end wall 39 of the recess to fit thereinto. Consequently, since the shell 26 is molded from flexible material having some elasticity, the side walls 39, 40, 41 and 42 will be snapped to snug engagement of the back, front and side edges of the land 48 and the shank stiffening member 47 for interfitting anchorage with interposed cement, such as that indicated at 43 in Fig. 5, or other supplemental means of anchorage assuring that the two basic shoe structure units will remain securely fastened together. As a result, the marginal depending flange of the full sole portion in the heel bottom area thereof seats upon the depressed and lateral marginal shoulder 50 of the heel about the raised land 48.

In Figs. 6, 7 and 8, a slightly modified form of shoe construction is illustrated at in which the heel and shank basic unit 127 may be much like that illustrated in Figs. 1 to 5 inclusive, and the toe cap vamp 35 may be similar to that employed in the first embodiment of the shoe construction. The unitary molded basic shell unit 126 may be similar in many respects to the shell unit 26 of the shoe construction illustrated in Figs. 1 to 5 inclusive, but, if desired, its full sole portion 128 may be externally shaped in the forepart sole area 130 and along the edges of the intervening shank area 131 to simulate at 53 the edges of an outsole. Also the embodiment of Figs. 6, 7 and 8 illustrate the feature that the side edges 141 and 1420f the indented recess, here referenced 138, may also be undercut with side edges 54 and 55 of shank stiffening member 147 being complementally tapered for interfitting engagement, as will be understood from Fig. 8, and in such case the side edges of the raised land 148 on the heel top portion 45 likewise will be tapered to flare obliquely upwardly for like interfitting engagement.

In Figs. 9 to 14 inclusive is illustrated another shoe construction embodying a modification of the shoe structure of the present invention. It will there be noted that the shoe construction 225 includes a unitary molded basic shell unit 226, a unitary molded basic heel and shank unit 27 (like that of Figs. 1 to inclusive) and a forepart vamp 135 in the form of a toe cap having a bottom wall. The shell unit 226 has a full sole portion228 which includes a heel bottom area 129, a forepart sole area 130 and an intervening shank area 131. The full sole portion 228 includes an upstanding counter portion 33, the front parts of which along the sides merge with vamp foxing 134, 134 on each side which terminate in the vicinity of the ball-supporting area 132, as will be seen from Fig. 14. The forepart sole area 130 is in the form of a flat platform having an integral land 56 on the top side thereof which is preferably medially located and may be of any suitable shape in outline, such as circular or oval to have a curved side edge 57.

The forepart vamp or toe cap 135 has a transverse bottom wall 58, the bottom face of which is shaped complementally to the top face of the forepart sole portion 130 and the ball-supporting area 132, so that the bottom face of the former may be juxtaposed to the top face of the latter. The forepart vamp 135 has the underface of its transverse bottom wall 58 provided with an opening 59, the side edge of which isshaped complementally to the curved side edge of the forepart sole land 56 so that the latter may be socketed into the former. Opposed surfaces of the forepart vamp 135 and the forepart sole 130 including its land 56 preferably are attached together by any suitable anchoring means, such as heat sealing of opposed surfaces together or by interposed cement indicated at 60 in Fig. 14.

As will be seen from Figs. 10, 11, 13 and 14, the unitary molded heel and shank unit 27 has all of the features of such unit in the shoe construction 25 of Figs. 1 to 5 inclusive, including the heel top portion 45, its land 49 and the shank stiffening member 47. The underside of the full sole portion 228 of shell unit 226 is likewise provided with an indented recess 38 similar to that of the Figs. 1 to 5 inclusive embodiment and interfitting engagement thereof is of the same nature.

It is to be understood that while in the Figs. 9 to 14 inclusive embodiment the interlocking land 56 is provided on the top face of the forepart sole 130 and its receptive opening 59 is provided in the bottom surface of the transverse bottom wall 58 of the forepart vamp 135, with this opening being defined by a through hole, such opening may be, if desired, in the form of a recess, as is illustrated in Fig. 17. As shown in Fig. 17, the transverse bottom wall 158 of the forepart vamp 235 has the opening defined as an indented recess 159 into which the raised land 56 sockets and in such case cement between juxtaposed surfaces will thus be interposed between the top of the land and the bottom of such socketing recess. It is also to be understood that the land may be formed on the bottom face of the transverse bottom wall of the forepart vamp 135 to depend therefrom for socketing in a recess in the top face of the forepart sole so as to constitute a mere reversal of parts providing similar interlocking characteristics. Such interlocking characteristics are important when vamp foxing is omitted in the forepart sole area so as to relieve interposed cement or other sealing means effecting anchorage between opposed faces thereof from excessive shear when lateral forces are created in the forepart vamp relative to the forepart sole with the latter having the tendency to be held by friction in a localized position on ground, floor or pavement surfaces as in the case of slipping and sliding. I

It is to be understood that an important feature of the present invention is the provision of a unitary molded basic shell unit which is produced for a variety of styles in a single form regardless of the height of the heel and the shape of the shank stiffening member to be'fitted thereto and its ultimate shape will be governed by the height and contour of the heel and shank stiffening mem-' her. The elasticity and flexibility of the material from which the basic shell unit is made permits this economical practice. In Fig. 15 is illustrated a shoe construction in which the unitary molded heel and shank unit 227 features a heavier heel 144 of intermediate height as contrasted with the high heel 44 of the Fig. 9 to 14 incl. embodiment. The shank stiffening member 247 of this unitary molded heel and shank unit 227 is accordingly contoured to have less slope than that at 47. In Fig. 16 a shoe construction 425 is illustrated in which the unitary molded heel and shank unit 327 has a still bulkier heel 244 of still lesser height with the shank stiffening member 347 being still flatter. Such changes in the heel and. shank units are readily accommodated to the same shell 226 with similar interfitting engagement and this, of course, is true of the shoe constructions illustrated in Fig. l to 8 incl. It will also be understood that, if desired, the shank stiffening member of the various unitary molded basic heel and shank units may be further strengthened or stiffened by an elongated reinforcing insert or overlay of sheet metal, such as steel, which can be placed in the mold cavity to be partially or wholly surrounded by the material from which the heel. and shank unit is molded.

There is illustrated by way of example in Fig. 18 conventional pressure mold structure comprising complementary mold parts 61 and 62 which, when interfitted, define between opposed surfaces thereof a cavity 63 in which the basic shell unit 226 may be molded by suitable heat and pressure. Fig. 19 illustrates by way of example conventional pressure mold structure comprising complementary parts 64 and 65 which, when interfitted, define between opposed surfaces thereof a cavity 66 inwhich the basic heel and shank unit 27 may be molded by suitable heat and pressure. Fig. 20 illustrates conventional pressure mold structure comprising complementary mold parts 6'7 and 68 which upon being interfitted together define between opposed surfaces a cavity 69 in which the forepart vamp may be molded by suitable heat and pressure. Fig. 21 illustrates conventional pressure mold structure comprising complementary mold parts 70 and '71 interfitted together to define between opposed surfaces a cavity 72 in which the forepart vamp 35 may be molded by suitable heat and pressure. Fig. 22 illustrates conventional pressure mold srtucture including complementary mold parts 73 and 74 which are interfitted together to define between opposed surfaces thereof a cavity 75 which will suitably shape by the use of heat and pressure the basic shell unit 26 with the simultaneous formation of the indented recess 38 therein. It will be understood that within the scope of the invention the heel element and the shank element of the unitary basic heel and shank unit may be separately formed and then permanently attached together to form thisunit, and this term is used herein in a sense which includes within the scope of its meaning such plural parts structure as well as a single part structure illustrated by Way of example in the drawings.

It will thus be seen that the objects set forth above, among those made apparent from the preceding description, are efiiciently attained and, since certain changes may be made in the above constructions without departing from the scope of the invention, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

It is also to be understood that the following claims are intended to cover all of the generic and specific features of the invention herein described, and all statements of the scope of the invention which, as a matter of language, might be said to fall therebetween.

Having described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A shoe structure including molded basic units interlocked together comprising, in combination; uppers and sole structure including a unitary molded basic shell unit of elastic and flexible material comprising at least a full sole portion having a heel bottom area, a forepart sole area and an intervening shank area merged with. said heel area and with said forepart sole area at a ball-supporting area, and an upstanding counter portion merged with said sole portion heel area, the bottom side of said full sole portion having an indented recess extending from the vicinity of the back end of said heel area through the shank area and to the vicinity of the ball-supporting area with depending side marginal edges of said recess spaced inwardly from the side edges of said full sole portion defining a marginal depending flange in the heel bottom sole area; and a basic heel and shank unit of relatively rigid material comprising a rigid heel having a top portion on which said heel bottom area of said sole portion seats, and an elongated shank stiffening member extending forward from the top portion of said heel, said heel top portion having a raised land thereon with the marginal back and side edges thereof spaced inwardly from the back and side edges of said heel top portion to define a ledge in the form of a depressed and lateral marginal outer side shoulder and with the top surface of said land merged with the top surface of said shank stiffening member, the latter and said land together being shaped complementary to said recess and seated and anchored therein with said marginal depending flange of said full sole portion in the heel bottom area thereof seating upon said depressed and lateral marginal shoulder of said heel about said raised land.

2. A shoe structure including molded basic units interlocked together comprising, in combination; uppers and sole structure including a unitary molded basic shell unit of elastic and flexible material comprising at least a full sole portion having a heel bottom area, a forepart sole area and an intervening shank area merged with said heel area and with said forepart sole area at a ball-supporting area, and an upstanding counter portion merged with said sole portion heel area, the bottom side of said full sole portion having an indented recess extending from the vicinity of the back end of said heel area through the shank area and to the vicinity of the ball-supporting area with depending side marginal edges of said recess spaced inwardly from the side edges of said full sole portion defining a marginal depending flange in the heel bottom sole area, the indented recess having an undercut transverse front end edge to provide a locking groove; and a unitary molded basic heel and shank unit of relatively rigid material comprising a rigid heel having a top portion on which said heel bottom area of said sole portion seats, and an elongated shank stiffening member extending forward from the top portion of said heel, said heel top portion having a raised land thereon with the marginal back and side edges thereof spaced inwardly from the back and side edges of said heel top portion to define a ledge in the form of a depressed and lateral marginal outer side shoulder and with the top surface of said land merged with the top surface of said shank stiffening member, the latter and said land together being shaped complementary to said recess and seated and anchored therein with the front end of said shank stiffening member having a transverse tapered edge interfitted into said transverse groove and with said marginal depending flange of said full sole portion in the heel bottom area thereof seating upon said depressed and lateral marginal shoulder of said heel about said raised land.

3. The shoe structure as defined in claim 2 characterized by the side and back edges of said recess being undercut to provide a continuous locking groove circumambient of said recess with said land and shank stiffening member having tapered back and side edges interfitted into said groove.

4. The shoe structure as defined in claim 2 characterized by said shell unit having as parts of said uppers structure a continuous vamp foxing providing an upstanding side wall along the edges of said forepart sole area and the side edges of said sole shank portion merged with said counter portion, and a forepart vamp having side walls lapped and anchored to a face of said vamp foxing.

5. The shoe structure as defined in claim 2 character ized by the provision of at least part of said uppers structure as a forepart vamp in the form of a toe cap having a transverse bottom wall seated on said sole forepart area with faces thereof opposed and anchored together, one of said opposed faces having an opening therein and the other opposed face having a complementally shaped land snugly fitted into said opening.

6. The shoe structure as defined in claim 5 characterized by said toe cap bottom wall face being provided with the opening in the form of a hole having curved side edges and said forepart top face being provided with said land having complementally curved side edges.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 114,340 Prusha et al May 2, 1871 468,223 Hess Feb. 2, 1892 2,349,374 Pym May 23, 1944 2,388,744 Hoy Nov. 13, 1945 2,795,866 Perugia June 18, 1957 2,798,312 Muller July 9, 1957 FOREIGN PATENTS 304,145 Germany Mar. 5, 1918 1,117,586 France Feb. 27, 1956

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US114340 *May 2, 1871 Improvement in boots and shoes
US468223 *Jul 30, 1891Feb 2, 1892 Bicycle-shoe
US2349374 *Feb 19, 1942May 23, 1944United Shoe Machinery CorpManufacture of shoes and shoe parts
US2388744 *Nov 12, 1942Nov 13, 1945Walter HoyShoe construction
US2795866 *Jul 31, 1956Jun 18, 1957Miller & Sons Inc ILadies' shoes
US2798312 *May 26, 1954Jul 9, 1957Frank A MullerPlastic shoe unit
DE304145C * Title not available
FR1117586A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3058240 *Oct 9, 1959Oct 16, 1962Osgood Charline RBasic shoe unit
US3120710 *Oct 7, 1959Feb 11, 1964Ariston Schuhfabrik Romen G MShoe construction with molded rigid rear sole part
US3145486 *May 11, 1961Aug 25, 1964Constantinos PetalasShoe having combined counter support and insole
US3153865 *Feb 11, 1963Oct 27, 1964Nathan SteinbockFootwear
US3523379 *Dec 5, 1967Aug 11, 1970Barsamian BarsamProcess for manufacturing shoes
US3536805 *May 7, 1968Oct 27, 1970Bruno RomenMethod of making shoes with shapeholding supporting frame
US4146981 *May 11, 1976Apr 3, 1979Leandre RenaldoFootwear structure with interchangeable elements
US4199878 *Aug 9, 1978Apr 29, 1980Hugo WossnerBallet and toe-dance shoe
US4244070 *Nov 2, 1978Jan 13, 1981Edoardo UghiSole with heel for women footwears or shoes, and method for quickly and economically making said soles with corresponding heels
US4409745 *Feb 26, 1982Oct 18, 1983Fratelli MusciInsole system for shoe with removably-mounted heel
US4835884 *Apr 8, 1988Jun 6, 1989The Rockport CompanyShoe structure
US5416989 *Nov 22, 1993May 23, 1995Brown Group, Inc.Shoe with a shank having a cushion therein
US5765295 *Jan 29, 1996Jun 16, 1998Polyplex Plastics Of North America Inc.Two piece shoe bottom construction
US6023858 *May 12, 1998Feb 15, 2000Reflections Shoe Corp.Two-piece shoe bottom system
US6460197 *Aug 16, 2001Oct 8, 2002Ing-Chung HuangRemovable, pressure-adjustable, shock-absorbing cushion device with an inflation pump for sports goods
US6745498 *Sep 11, 2002Jun 8, 2004Laduca Phillip F.High-heeled jazz dancing and character dancing shoe
US7730634Mar 15, 2006Jun 8, 2010Laduca Phillip FHigh-heeled jazz dancing and character dancing shoe
US20030138528 *Nov 14, 2002Jul 24, 2003Hague Frank JayAnimal treat
US20040045191 *Sep 11, 2002Mar 11, 2004Laduca Phillip F.High-heeled jazz dancing and character dancing shoe
US20070283600 *Dec 4, 2006Dec 13, 2007Jose Trives MarcosHeel and insole combination for woman's shoe
US20140123520 *Nov 7, 2012May 8, 2014Mali TAYARHigh-heeled shoe
US20140208613 *Sep 25, 2013Jul 31, 2014Erik BarrRigid Shoe Insert with Raised Heel
WO2009034463A1 *Sep 12, 2008Mar 19, 2009Gh SrlFootgear
WO2017031090A1 *Aug 15, 2016Feb 23, 2017Thesis Couture, Inc.High heel shoe
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/108, 36/76.00R, 36/45, 36/68, 36/24.5
International ClassificationA43B23/00, A43B23/22
Cooperative ClassificationA43B13/32, A43B13/37, A43B23/22, A43B13/41
European ClassificationA43B23/22, A43B13/37, A43B13/32, A43B13/41