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Publication numberUS2912791 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 17, 1959
Filing dateFeb 10, 1955
Priority dateFeb 10, 1955
Publication numberUS 2912791 A, US 2912791A, US-A-2912791, US2912791 A, US2912791A
InventorsBenjamin Cohen
Original AssigneeBenjamin Cohen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toy
US 2912791 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 17, Y1959 B. COHEN 'roy Filed Feb. 1o, 195s' IlII-IIIIII- I MUM INVENTOR EM/AM/A/ I Cof-15M ATTORNEY v2,912,791 Patented Nov. 17, 1959 ice TOY Benjamin'cohen, New York, N.Y. Application February 10, 1955, Serial No. 487,245

. 2I Claims. (Cl. 46-88) The present invention relates to toys and more particularly to a toy which may be used in numerous ways.

The type of toy in which a peg or the like is adapted to be hammered through a hole has been in Widespread use for an exceedingly long period of time. However, this type of toy has several disadvantages. One of the main disadvantages derives from the fact that considerable force is required to drive the peg through the board aperture. This requires the use of a relatively heavy hammer which may be difiicult for a child to use. Furthermore, the presence of a relatively heavy hammer in a childs hand constitutes a menace to surrounding objects. A further disadvantage of this type of toy is the fact that a child quickly loses interest in the simple manipulation required in driving the pegs.

The present invention, in one of its forms, employs the principle of the peg-type toy with its attendant advantage of providing a child with a hammer which most children enjoy using, and with the further advantage of v utilizing the blows of the hammer to sound a whistle and blow up a balloon. As a result the interest of the child is maintained for a longer period of time and with greater enjoyment. The present device is so constructed that it can be used with a hammer or by simple manipulation converted to a toy having similar advantages without usinga hammer.

A further advantage of the present invention is the provision of a toy which is attractive in appearance, inexpensive to manufacture, and highly durable under the rough treatment to which it is usually subjected by children.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will be readily apparent from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawing, wherein:

Figure l is a vertical sectional view of one embodiment of the invention.

Figure 2 is a top view of the toy shown in Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a side view of the toy sho'wn in Figure l but with the operating handle removed and showing a hammer for us'e with the toy.

Figure 4 is a partial sectional view of a modified form of balloon for use with the present toy.

Referring to the drawing in detail, the toy comprises a hollow box defining a chamber 11 for receiving a rubber bulb 12. The box may be formed of any suitable material such as wood or plastic and may be suitably decorated with designs or in color.

As seen in Figure 1, one end wall of the body of the box indicated by numeral 13 includes a projecting nozzle 14 having mounted therein a whistle 15. The inner surface of the wall 13 is recessed at 16 to receive a tapered portion 17 of the bulb which carries a ball valve 18 for a purpose to be described. The nozzle 14 is provided with a bore 19 which communicates Iwith the interior of the bulb through aperture 20.

The opposite wall 21 of the box is also recessed at 22 to receive the tapered end 23 of the bulb. This tapered end also carries a ball valve 24 and the wall 21 is apertured at 25 to communicate with the interior of the bulb through aperture 26. The ball Valves 18 and 24 are one way valves so arranged as to permit exit of air through valve 1S upon depression of the bulb and entrance of air through valve 24 when the bulb returns to its normal shape. lt will be understood that the bulb 12 has suicient rigidity to return to its normal shape as seen in Figure 1. y

The bulb depressing -means comprises a peg 27 having an enlarged base 2S normally pressing against the upper surface of the bulb. The cover member 29 which is secured to the box 10 by means of screws 30 is provided with an opening 31 which loosely receives the pegV 27 with thebase 28 abutting against the under surface of the cover member. As seen in Figure 1, the cover member 29 has a cut-out portion 32 to receive one end of an operating handle 33. A pin 34 extending through the cover member and the operating handle 33 serves to pivotally connect the handle to the cover but permits ready removal of said handle when it is desired to use the hammer 35 shown in Figure 3.

A balloon 36 having any desired conguratio-n is shown to be mounted on the nozzle. In the form shown in Figure 4, the balloon carries a whistle 37 reversely positioned whereby it makes a whistling sound when the air is expelled from the balloon. In Figure l, the nozzle includes a whistle whereas in the form shown in Figure 4, the Whistle is omitted.

The toy operates in the following manner:

When the peg 27 is depressed either by forcing down the handle or lever 33 or striking the peg with the hammer 35, the bulb 12 is compressed forcing air out through nozzle 14 and into the balloon 36 slightly inflating the balloon and causing the whistle 15 to sound. Upon lifting the lever or hammer, valve 18 closes, maintaining the balloon in its partially inilated condition, and valve 24 opening to admit air into the bulb. The resiliency of the bulbl restoring itself to its normal condition lifts the peg 27 in position for the next blo-w or stroke. Repeated movement of the lever or hammer tends lto inflate the balloon to any size which can then be removed and replaced by another balloon. A number of balloons of any desired conguration can be furnished with each toy.

To add additional interest to the toy, the balloon can include a whistle as shown in Figure 4. In this form, because of the location of the whistle in the neck of the balloon, when the balloon reaches a certain size, it automatically slips off the nozzle and as the balloon deates, a whistling sound results.

From the foregoing description it is apparent that the present toy is well adapted to accomplish the objects and advantages set forth. It will be understood that minor changes may be made in the details of construction without departing from the spirit of the invention as defined in the following claims.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed is:

l. A toy comprising a rigid housing having a at bottom thereon for supporting said housing on a hat surface, said housing being wholly supported by resting on said bottom, a nozzle extending from and forming a part of said housing, a resilient bulb wholly contained within said housing, said bulb having a portion thereof in sealed relationship with said nozzle and having a passage therethrough communicating with said nozzle, an air outlet valve in said passage, air inlet means in said housing, an air inlet valve in said bulb, a member contacting said bulb for compressing the bulb, said member having a portion thereof extending from said housing and being adapted to be actuated by a force applied thereto for 3 compressing said bulb, and an air actuated amusement device mounted on said nozzle for actuation by air passing through said nozzle when said bulb is compressed.

2. A toy comprising a rigid housing having a flat bottom thereon for supporting said housing on a at surface, said housing being Wholly supported by resting on said bottom, a nozzle extending from and forming a part of said housing, a resilient bulb Wholly contained Within said housing, said bulb having a portion thereof in sealed relationship with said nozzle and having a portion therethrough communicating with said nozzle, an air outlet valve in said passage, air inlet means in said housing, an air inlet valve in said bulb, a member contacting said bulb for compressing the bulb, said member having a portion thereof extending 'from said housing and being adapted to be actuated by a force applying means applied thereto for compressing said bulb, said force applying means comprising a lever having one end pivoted to said housing, and an air actuated amusement device mounted on said nozzle for actuation by air passing through said nozzle when said bulb is compressed.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Lapham June 19, McGiven Oct. 16, Doellinger July 18, Divine Aug. 17, Roitman Apr. 14, Steiner May 26, Boggs Aug. 18, Larsen July 10, Moore June 8, Maywald Feb. 8, Wescott July 10, Dunn et al Aug. 28, Shute Apr. 8, Marks Aug. 11, Glasco Feb. 8,

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US28758 *Jun 19, 1860 Eufus lapham
US659758 *Feb 28, 1898Oct 16, 1900William McgivenCombined bubble-blowing and whistling device.
US795108 *Dec 14, 1904Jul 18, 1905Lawrence M HollidayPneumatic pillow.
US931578 *Feb 6, 1909Aug 17, 1909Silas R DivineToy musical instrument.
US1092862 *Sep 26, 1912Apr 14, 1914Nathan RoitmanToy.
US1098303 *Dec 19, 1913May 26, 1914 Sounding figure toy.
US1107481 *Aug 18, 1914 Hydroballoon.
US1461193 *Feb 10, 1922Jul 10, 1923Hans LarsenPneumatic toy
US1588040 *Apr 14, 1884Jun 8, 1926 Title not available
US1616664 *Sep 26, 1924Feb 8, 1927Maywald Frederick JCombined hollow rubber toy and sound emission device
US2559909 *May 4, 1949Jul 10, 1951Wescott Harvey MPartially expandible toy figure
US2565679 *May 4, 1950Aug 28, 1951Dunn Ruth ABalloon toy
US2592347 *Sep 2, 1949Apr 8, 1952Shute Charles EInflatable toy
US2648288 *May 25, 1949Aug 11, 1953Marks William JFluid pump
US2701672 *Aug 11, 1952Feb 8, 1955Gushion B Clark JrBall pump
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3092929 *Jan 9, 1961Jun 11, 1963Ostrander Robert KDolls
US3127845 *Oct 3, 1960Apr 7, 1964Carl S VoelckerPump design
US3138895 *Nov 14, 1961Jun 30, 1964Gausewitz Richard LTake-apart toy in which a whistle is caused to sound by piston action during assembly and disassembly
US3142130 *Sep 14, 1962Jul 28, 1964Weitzell Rex WCombination container and sound producing device
US3340846 *May 31, 1966Sep 12, 1967Magiera Joseph SSound making device
US3525169 *Oct 25, 1967Aug 25, 1970William OdenwaldCreature repeller
US3777310 *Oct 16, 1972Dec 11, 1973Yang JDecorative applique having air-actuated noisemaker
US3878640 *Sep 9, 1974Apr 22, 1975Kauffman Charles ENoise producing amusement device
US4164092 *Feb 25, 1977Aug 14, 1979A. E. GoldfarbToy milkable animal figure
US4279100 *Sep 28, 1979Jul 21, 1981Marvin Glass & AssociatesSounding toy
US4878335 *Aug 31, 1988Nov 7, 1989Hardy Donald JMethods and apparatus for inserting objects within balloons
US5033985 *Jul 11, 1990Jul 23, 1991Nahas Gregory HDiet aid dolls
US5139390 *Feb 4, 1991Aug 18, 1992Rajewski Robert KPump and method for drawing vapor from a storage tank without forcibly drawing the vapor from the tank
US5261850 *Dec 10, 1991Nov 16, 1993Mattel, Inc.Elastic material inflation toy
US5603361 *Oct 18, 1994Feb 18, 1997Cuisinier; Jarret P.Portable water balloon and container filler
US5704154 *Apr 25, 1996Jan 6, 1998Galfidi, Jr.; JoeWeapon mounted game caller
US5983965 *Aug 10, 1998Nov 16, 1999Patrick; Bryan AllenExpander for flexible baby bottle liner
US7887467 *Mar 1, 2004Feb 15, 2011Bruce Wayne BookerWhistling punching bag
US20050192165 *Mar 1, 2004Sep 1, 2005Booker Bruce W.Whistling punching bag
US20060287629 *Oct 31, 2003Dec 21, 2006Novo Nordisk A/SJet injector with a bi-stable spring
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/186, 446/220, 116/139, 417/478, 141/313
International ClassificationA63H27/10, A63H27/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63H2027/1058, A63H2027/1083, A63H27/10
European ClassificationA63H27/10