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Publication numberUS2912976 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 17, 1959
Filing dateMar 4, 1955
Priority dateMar 4, 1955
Publication numberUS 2912976 A, US 2912976A, US-A-2912976, US2912976 A, US2912976A
InventorsGrund Carl C
Original AssigneeGrund Carl C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Massage apparatus
US 2912976 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

3 Shee'cs-Sheec 1 Nov. 17, 1959 c. c. GRUND MASSAGE APPARATUS Filed March 4, 1955 Filed March 4, 1955 Nov. 17, 1959 c. C,GRUND 2912,976

MASSAGE APPARATUS 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 lNl/ENTOR. CARL C. GRUND Nov. 17, 1959 c. c. GRUND 2,912,976

MASSAGE APPARATUS Filed March 4, 1955 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 24 /NVEN TOR. GAR]. C. GRUND BYJMJ 4 7' 7' ORNE YS.

nited States My invention relates to anew and improved massage apparatus or device and while it was developed prirnarily for use in massaging the gums, it is equally applicable for use on other parts of the body as will become apparent.

The therapeutic value o f massage to body tissues under proper conditions is too well established tO require any extensive discussion here although certain aspects should be mentioned for a better understanding cf the novel characteristics of my invention as compared With other devices known to the art. In general, massage is a term used to signify a group of external manipulations for the purpose of aflecting the nervous and muscular systems and the general circulation. For best results, massage should take the form cf compression and release which forces the transudates into the lymph vessels and the red blood cells plugging the capillaries are forced into the venules, thus opening the capillaries to arterial blood. The effect of this is to drain 011 acids and the injurious end products of inflarnmation and to bring in fresh oxygen and cell nutriment.

Certain medical and dental texts would point out that massage is more effective when done manually even though there are innumerable devices for doing it mechanically and it has been my experience over a period of many years that the problem lies nt in a mechanical apparatus per se but in the manner and form of use which seerns to be characteristic of such devices. Mechanical massagers for the body and limbs and particularly for use in the treatment of periodontal and gingival disturbances are in what might be termed the vibrator dass, or in other words are high speed reciprocating devices tha-t shake or pummel the tissue rather than cornpress o1 release it. Consequently, they do not accomplish the blood circulation previously described as the purpose of a proper compression and release massage movement.

It is Well established that body tissue has a certain normal resiliency by virtue of which it rebounds frorn cornpression of a proper massage movernent. As a result when such tissue is subjected to a rapid succession cf contacts from a high speed vibrating surface, it may be compressed at the first contact where it remains since successive contacts come at too rapid a rate to permit of any rebounding with the result that the tissue in eifect remains static and the intended effect of the purported massage is lost almost entirely. From the above observations it would thcn appear that the actual nature of the massage movement whether mechanical or manual is itself of minor importance providing it is rhythmicaland bears a-relationship t0 the rebounding ability of the tissues and perhaps also to the blood circulation as aiiected by the pulse rate. Such factors seem to have been completely overlooked by-present mechanicalmas sage devices.

It is therefore one of the important objects of this invention to provide anew and improved mechanically operated massaging apparatus characten'zed by a rhythmical action for compressing and releasing or kneading of the atent ly, can be adjusted: for gnrns of differentwidths, and;

can be regulated to increase or decrease the;forceand-- depth of the compressionzstroke.

Another object 011 myinyention is to pro vide an im, proved gum massager for mor;eeflective interproximal, stimulation in cases cf perioclontal and gingi val dis-- tnrbances..

These, and other objects. will be apparen-t to.= thosc; skilled in the;art

My invention cqnsis ts= in the, construction,- arrangements, and cornbination;of thevarious parts ofthede vice, whereby the objects; contemplated are attained= as. hereinafter. more:fully set forth, specifically pointed;out in my claims, and;illustrated-inthe accompanyingdrawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a perspec tive -view of my; new massaging ap paratus illustrating a preferred embodiment thereof for use on gums,

Fig. 2 is a side elevationaliview=ofthe device:in.Fig: 1 with portions of:tl:1e;casingor housingbrok&n awayto more fully illustrate: its constructibm Fig, 3' is anenlargcdfr.ont view-of the massagihg tipson th is device in extreme open position in solid lines= and shown. in close.d position. 1111b1'0k11 lines,

Fig, 4 is; a;crosssectional:viewtaken onthe line 4 4* of. Fig; 5;

Fig.; 5 is an:enlarged rear view of this devicewith the cover, brokernaway. tomore: clearly. illustrate the constructi0n thereof;

showing themin .open=. andsclosed 1positi0nrespectively Figs; 8 ;and; 91arewlargcdxfrontandside views respec- -tively ofi oneof; the; massaging=tips and; shown partially in section toillustrate; itsattachment to -the massaging arm,

Fig; 10 15,13I1; enlarged-I fragmentary view showing calibrations fr adjstment-of=the=massage=arm and is taken fr'om the line 10=10in Fig. 2;

Fig. 11 is=anenlargediopview of the lower portion of the housing in Fig. 2 ta-ken onthe line 11-11 cf that- Fig. 2, and

Fig. 12 iswperspective: view of my new massager= similar to Fig. 1 but shown adapted and mountedfor use onthe limbs= of the: body.

the-fonward eud8. An elongated tubular support membep- 30415 mounted through the iorward' end 28- so;that a portiomthereof lieswith iu section*l8 andis detachabl'y secured therein by ascrew=32 inserted from the bottomfk 3400f section 18= intoihe=-undflside of membe; 30. Tl1ef rearward end6t of supportmember0 (Fig; 2) isths spaced-Torwardly:ofthe rear end526 at:a point approxi# mately two: thirds the distance fromtend28. Thus ar rznged, member 30 projects forwardly fr0m and beyond section 18 parallel to the longitudinal axis thereof as shown more particularly in Figs. 1 and 2. In the forward end cf tubular member 30 there is inserted a pluglike bearing member 38 (Fig. 3) and a like bearing memher 40 is similarly placed in the r'ear (Figs. 2 and 6) A pair cf elongated like rods or shafts 42 and 44 (Fig. 11)

designed for rotation about their longitudinal axes as will later appear are mounted in member 30 in horizontal spaced parallel relaiionship and project from both the forward and rear ends thereof. For this purpose it will be understood that suitable aligned openings are drilled in the respective plugs 38 and 40 and the respective shafts 42 and 44 are rotatable therein and of course are supported thereby. Openings 46 and 48 (Fig. 11) may be provided in the top portion of member 30 within section 18 if desired to facilitate lubrication of shafts 42 and 44 at tirnes.

The protrucling ends cf shafts 42 and 44 from rear plug 40 are bent to form the contact arms 50 and 52 and spring means 54 and 56 (Fig. 11) connected respectively between arms 50 and 52 to the corresponding sicles of member 30 within section 18 are placed to normally hold arms 50 and 52 in an upturned position where they are in a relative Position as shown in Fig. 6. On the ends of shafts 42 and 44 which project frorn the forward plug 38 in rnember 30 there is integrally or separately formed the respective collar like support members 58 and 60 which are formed so that their relative position to each other corresponds to that cf arms 50 and 52 as shown in Fig. 7 and also as can be determined from Fig. 2. Tims, it will be understood as arms 42 and 44 are rotated on their longitudinal axes, collars 58 and 60 will rnove away from and towards each other correspiandingly to arms 50 and 52.

Collars 58 and 60 are each drilled in parallel alignment with the longitudinal axis of member 30 to slidably, rotatably receive the respective elongated resilient arm extension mernbem62 and 64 which may be secured therein by the'respective Set screws 66 and 68. The forward end portions of arm extensions 62 and 64 are each bent downwardly at approximately right angles indicated by the numerals 70 and 72 and the extreme outer ends thereof are then bent towards each other in a V-shape to form the supports 74 and 76 for the massaging tips 78. These tipsare preferably made from soft plastic or surgical rubber but may of course be formed from any other suitable material and as shown I preferably shape thern with a projecting tip or peak 80 that increases the efiec tiveness of interproximal stimulation in gingival massage. Tips 78 are frictionally placed on supports 74 and 76 and may be easily removecl for cleaning and sterilizing. On the top side of each collar 58 and'60 I have placed a guide mark 82 and on each arm extension 62 and 64 there are a plurality of like calibrations or guide marks 84. This serves to align and adjust the relative positions of tips 78 and by having the marks 84 it is possible to adjust both extension arms alike by aligning the respective marks 84 with ma'rk 82.

For rotating shafts 42 and 44 on their longitudinal axes so that tips 78 move toward and away from each other as will later be described in detail I use a small direct drive electric motor indicated generally by the numeral 86 in Fig. 5. This motor is of a type coinmercially available, except for certain adaptations I shall describe, and therefore the details of its construction, having no patentable significance as concerns (bis invention, are not described in detail. Particularly, I Wish to point out that motor 86 is of the type having a rotating drive shaft 88 and is not a vibrating mechanism which is found in practically all other devices of this dass. For purpose of this description the end of motor 86 frorn which shaft 88 projects is referred to as the rear face 90 (Fig. 5). T this face I have secured a plate 92 (Figs. and by means of screws or bolts and nuts 94 and th1s plate is provided with a suitable opening for the projection of shaft 88 toward the rear. 011 plate 92 and at one side of shaft 88 is the bracket or support 96 to which the gear 98 is concent rically rotatably secured by any means such as nut 100 attached to shaft 99 which is flush with the left side of gear 98 as viewed in Fig. 5. Shaft 88 has been externally threaded and gear 98 has been associated therewith to fonn a wenn gear for operation in a well known manner. At the other side of shaft 88, a bar 102 is disposed in a track means 104 integrally formed in plate 92 for a vertical sliding movement which is accomplished by a rigid link 106 pivotally connected at one end 108 to bar 102 and similarly eccentrically connected to gear 98 at the other end 110. By this arrangement it will be understood that rotation of gear 98 will cause bar 102 to travel alternately upwardly and downwardly in tracl 104 for a predetermined distance and at a fixed rate of speed which may be varied depencling upon the diameter of gear 98 and/er the point 015 attachment thereto of link 106 relative to the axis of the gear. Across the bottom of bar 102 there is integrally forrned or otherwise secured a cross member 112 which extends transversely of the longitudinal axis cf member 30 and remains in this relative osition throughout its vertical movement.

Motor 86 is pivotally mounted at its lower forward end to the upper forward portion of lower casing section 18 by rneans of the pin 114 (Figs. l and 2) and for this purpose I have mounted a bottorn plate 116 to motor 86 for receiving pin 114. Thus mounted, cross member 112 will be positioned transversely of the arms 50 and 52 (Fig. 6) and will push against them in its downward rnovernent so as to move them away from each other (Fig. 7) causing shafts 42 and 44 to rotate on their longitudinal eures. Springs 54 and 56 will of course return arms 50 and 52 to their position shown in Fig. 6 011 the npward rnovernent of cross member 112.

As pointed out above motor 86 is m ounted in lower section 18 to pivot on pin 114 and this has been designed to afford certain adjustments in the movement of tips 78 as fol lows, Bar 102 having a stroke of a predetermined distance, it will be understood that the farther above arms 50 and 52 cross rnember 112 is located relative to the position in Fig. 6, the less bar 102 will descend into section 18 to provide a correspondingly shorter pati1 oft travel of arms 50 and 52. Conversely, the closer bar 102 is to arms 50 and 52, the deeper into sect-ion 18 will be its descent and the greater the rotation of shafts 42 and 44. This of course directly aliects the closeness which tips 78 approach each other. T0 accomplish this adjustment a screw rnember 118 depends frorn the top of the upper casing 16 and is rotatecl by a control knob 120. With section 16 in place over rn0t=or 86 and attached to lower section 18, screw 118 registers With an internally threaded opening 122 in the top of motor 86. Thus by turning screw 118 to take up the threads in opening 122 the rear of motor 86 will be elevated as it pivots on pin 114 and obviously raises the lowermcst point to which bar 102 can descend. By reversing the movernent of knob the rear of motor 86 is lowered allowing bar 102 to penetrate deeper into the lower section 18. The upper housing section 16 has an opening 124 for access t0 the contact 126 to which the electric cord 128 is attached in a Weil known manner.

The speed at which bar 102 reciprocates o1 in other words the relative number of complete strokes per minute that it makes is one of the important characteristics that distinguishes this invention from others in the same dass and is a factor which in cooperation with the manner of operation of tips 78 produces an entirely difierent effect and result from present type massaging devices. Such present type devices appear to depend upon high speed mechanical vibrating rneans to rock or shake or vibrate a massage arm 01' arms that in turn tap, hit or pumrnel the tissue in a manner which has mistakenly been referred tp as a massa ge movement or treatment. Compared to other devices are known to tap or pummel.thetissue at rates in the thousands per minute whichas.pointed out earlier does not. permit thetissue to rebound due;.to its normal resiliency and consequently createsa.v static condition as afiects circulatidn. Such rapid pounding of-(the tissue does not therefore acc'ornplish. the purpose and function of proper massa'ge in the form of rhythmic al compression and release which ean be found:defined in all literature 011 the subjeet.

With reference now to the use. and operation ofthis device it will be noted.whein arms 50. and 52 areinupright position (Fig. 6) thetips 78.are oppositely disposed and at their widest point of separation. This Spacing; can be manually adjusted.by loosening set screws66. andi 68 (Fig. 3), rotating shaft extensions 62a'nd 64=to move the tips 78 closer together and retightening the screws. In doing this; guide lines 82 and 84 make it possiblev to. adjust each tip an equal amount andthus the.spacing can:v be adapted for any Width. gums. When fnotor 86 is started and bar 102 reciprocates in a vertical: plane, cross member 112 will push arms 50 and 52as described to move tips 78 toward each other. In thisopertion, the upward position of arrns 50 and 52 is such that they are normally inclined slightly away from the vertical and away from each other to assure their rotation: as described. To further facilitate this action, the upperinner:

surface of each arm 50 and 52 may be beveled 'asat 130:- for a sliding contact with cross member 112 in an obvious manner. On the upward stroke of bar 102, springs S4and: 56 will, of course, move the tips 78 away from each other. It will be appreciated thatthe movernents of tips 78 are rhythmical and positive and as seen in Fig. 3 the movement of each tip defines a curved pathfirst dowm wardly, them toward the opposite tip or toward the tissue being acted upon and then slightly upwardly. lt is a smooth firm movement that gently compresses er kneads the tissue so as to be a.distinct contrast from the staccato tapping of a vibrating meehanism and to simulate more naturally the massage movement of manualmanipulation. Tips 78 can be placed tostraddlethe gums so that both sides are compressed and: released simultaneously and can be moved back and forth. and upand= down as may be required with the points 80 Working in the interproximal spaces.

Much experimenting has been done relative to the rate of speed at which the tips 7 8move towardand away from eacl1 other and while I do not propose to limit this invention to any specific rate, I do wish to point out certain factors which are deemed to be of irnpo rtance. I have found that compression of the gums by tips 78 at rates up to 300 times per minute produce much more benefieial results as compared with high speed vibrating devices that operate in the thousands per minute. Where the dividing line onspeed is which separates acompression and release aetion from a constant tapping by Vibration cannot be stated with any degree of certainty and therefore what Iclaimas the basie innovtion inthis invention is a device which departsfromthe vibratingprinciple-and utilizes the compression and release apprdachfor cooperation with the normal ability of the tissue-to rebound fr om a gentle compression. In this respect, it has=b en established that the average pulse rate is around' 70 per mim 1te with variations of cou rse b.oth slower and faster under 0ertain circumstances and therefore by adapting the speed of movement of tips7. in some definite relations hiptot the pulse rate, the benefits of the massage are found to be highly beneficial. Thus, moving thetips fora compression action at a rateequal to halfiasmuch 011 two or three times the pulse rate has proven very satisfactory. A slower rate will of course retain the compres sion and release principle, and higher rates; that do not getinto a:

vibrating action wi1hstillbe cf consideranly gr eaterv ene fit as :compared with high speedvibrators;

The. raising-- and lowering of the rear end of'motor 86 by screw 118 (Fig. 2) previously deserihed, affords;

another importantadjustment that is novel in devices of this dass. By lowering the motor 86, orossmern-v ber 112 will descend deeper into casing section 18 and; causea greater rotation of shafts 42 and 44lby moving arms 50 and 52as shown in Fig. 7. This of course moves tips 78 closer together than would a lesser rotation of;

shafts 42 and 44 and provides a positive,yfirmand more sustained eompressing action. Because arms 50 and 52 cannot respond to springs 54 and 56 until eross member 112 nioves upwardly, the actionby tip78 is definitely one of -gentle but firm compression as distinguished from a tap or purnmeling. This pressure is.of-course increased: er decreased by initially adjusting the, spacing of tips; 78 as described.

Anotherinnovation in this inventio-n resides in the use of the resilient shaft extensions 62- and 64 which add yieldability in the aetion of tips 78. Thus, as, the tips78press againstthegums 132 (Fig. 1) a slight beurling in the extensions 62 and 64 may occur in rsponseto resistance by the gums to the pressure of tips78. Thus there is a yieldingness to the compression action that makes the massage more gentle than if the massage tips. were mounted to rigid members. Such yielding ability ofmembers 62 and 64- cam o=f course be increased or deereased as may seemappropriate by adjusting them longitudinally in. collars 58 and 60.

With reference now to Fig. 12 I have shown my massaging device mounted on a vertically adjustable support 134 for use 011 parts. of the body other :tl1an the gums and illustrated as being used 011 a leg 136. The structure cf this device is the same as previously described so that like parts are given like numerals. However, in the case of the massage tips it may bepreferable to use fiat pad members 138 and the shaft extensions 62*and 64 may terminate in the bifurcated arms 1.40and142 which attach to opposite ends of the pads 138 as shown and thereby serve to malte the pads confo'rm to.the contour of the Portion being massaged. Itis also pointed out thatwhile two massaging pads are shown, it is possible to remove and pad and extension arm and use the remain.ing one; when massaging such places as the small of the back; and the like.

lt is subrnittedthat the invention shown; and. described is aptly suited to achieve the purposes intended and. is. characterizedby a combination of-highl3useful and mutually cooperating elements that combine their respective and proportionate functions in accomplishing the ob. jeets.sought to be obtained.

Some changes may be made in the co-nstruetion and arrangement of my massage apparatus-without departing said motor pivotallysecured at one e nd to one end of sa1d. hous1ng so said cross member is spaced above and in line withsaid arm and capable of contacting the Same in the, downward stroke of its travel, said motor when actuated causing'said cross.member to bear against said am to partially rotate said shaft in one direction about its, longitudinal axis m'eans to partially rotate said= shaft in the otheiw directionwhen saidbross member moves upwardly away, from said arm, and means gearing said shaft =to said motor sothat the reeiprocationof said=cross member is fixed to 'contact said arm at a rate synchronized With the ability cf the tissue being massaged to rebound due to its normal resiliency after being cornpressed by the massage rnember.

2. A device as defined in claim 1 characterized by a manually rotatable screw means in said housing threadably connected to said electric motor whereby said electric motor can be selectively raised and lowered on its pivot point to different fixed positions within said housing and thereby vary the distance between said cross momber and said arm to selectively change the duration of contact between the cross member and said arm during a given stroke of said cross mernber which correspondingly varies the degree of rotation of said straft.

3. A d8vice as defined in claim 1 characterized by a resilient straft extension rotatably attached to the eurer and of said shaft with said -massage memlmer on the outer end of said shaft extension, and means to fix said shaft at different positions of rotation relative to said shaft.

4. A massaging apparatus, comprising, a housing designed to serve as a handle means, a pair of parallel shafts disposed in said housing so as to project therefrorn, a resilient shaft extension rotatably attaclred to the outer and of each shaft, massaging tips in spaced relationship to each other on the outer end of each shaft extension, means to fix said shaft extensions at different positions cf rotation relative to said shaft whereby the spaced relationship of said tips can be adjustably fixed, an arm on the inuer end of each shaft, a vertically reciprocating cross member in said housing positioned to contact said arms 011 its downward stroke, means in said housing fo-r actuating said cross rnember, said cross mernber causing said shafts to partially rotate in one direction about their longitudinal axes so as to move said tips toward each other, means to rotate said shafts in the opposite direction, and said cross rnember constructed and arranged to operate at a rate whereby said tips produce a rhythmical coxnpressiaon and release or kneading movernent of the body tissue to which it is applied and thus enables tl1e tissue to rebound due to its normal resiliency after being compressed by said tips, and means within said housing to vary the distance between said cross member and said arms so as to selectively change the duration of sontact between said cross mernber and said arms during a given stroke of said cross member which correspondingly varies the degree of rotation of said shafts.

5. A massaging device including a pair of shafts partially rotatable in two opposite directions respectively about their longitudinal axes, massage tips carried by said shafts and movable toward and away from eacb other by alternate directions of rotation of said shafts, an arm 011 one and of each shaft, a vertically reciprocating cross mernber positioned to contact said arms 011 its downward stroke, means for actuating said cross member, said cross mernber causing said shafts to partially rotate in one dir'ection about their longitudinal axes, means to rotate said shafts in the opposite direction, and means to vary the distance between said cross member and said arms so as to selectively change the duration of contact between said cross member and said arrns during a given stroke of said cross mernber which correspondingly varies the degree of rotation of said shafts.

6. A massaging apparatus, comprising a support, a pair of spaced parallel shafts mounted in said support for rotation about their longitudinal axes, a massage head 011 one and of each respective straft, said massage heads oppositely disposed and in spaced relationship in starting position, an angularly disposed arm on the other and of each respective shaft, said arrns in parallel spaced relationship defining their starting position, means movabla into engagement with said arms in a rhythmic sequence to move them away from each other causing partial rotation of said shafts in one direction and a corresponding movement of said massage heads toward each other, means en gageable with said arms to return them to starting posi tion, and means to selectively vary the duration of rhythmic contact between said arms and said arm engaging means. v

7. A device as defined in claim 6 wherein said last two mentioned means are constructed and arranged to produce a gentle rhythmic 'movement of said massage heads toward and away frorn each other at a rate bearing some direct relationship to the average pulse rate in the human body.

8. A massage =apparatus cornprising a support, a pair of spaced parallel shafts mounted in said support for rotation about their longitudinal axes, a massage head on one end of each respective straft, said massage heads oppositely disposed and in spacecl relationship in starting osition, an angularly disposed arm 011 the other encl of each rqspective shaft, said arms in parallel spaced relationship defining their starting position, a reciprocating bar mernber operatively associated with said support, means for reciprocating the saure, said bar engageable With said arms for moving the sarne apart to cause partial rotation of said shafts and a corresponding movement of said massage heads towards each other, means engageable with said arms to return them to starting position, and means selectively varying the length of the stroke of said bar in reciprocating rnovement to selectively vary the duration of contact of said bar mernber with said arms and to correspondingly vary the degree of rotation of said shaft.

9. A massaging apparatus, comprising a support, a pair of spaced parallel shafts mounted in said support for rotation about their longitudinal axes, a massage head on one end of each respective shaft, said massage heads oppositely disposed and in spaced relationship in starting position, a motor driven reciprocating bar member, said bar member engageable with said arms for rnoving the same apart to cause partial rotation of said shafts and a corresponding movernent of said massage heads towards each other, means engageable With said arms to return them to starting position, means selectively varying the length of .the stroke cf said bar in reciprocating movement to selectively vary the duration of contact of said bar with said arms and to correspondingly vary the degree of rotation of said shaft, and gearing on said motor to control the reciprocation of said bar at a rate by which the corresponding movement of said massage heads toward and away from each other can produce a gentle but firm rhythmic cornpression and release effect on tissue being massagecl as distinguished frorn a rapid tapping and pumrneling effect of a high speed vibrating device.

10. A massaging device including a pair cf shafts partially rotatable in two opposite directions respectively about their longitudinal axes, massage tips carried by said shafts and movable toward and away from each other by alternate directions of rotation of said shafts, a recipro cating member operatively engageable with said shafts only during one direction of reciprocation and coustructed so as to apply a relatively steady and firm force thereto to partially rotate them in one direction, rncans to rotate said shafts in the opposite direction, and means to selectively vary the duration of operable engagement between said reciprocating rnember and said shafts.

11. A massaging device including a pair of shafts partially rotatable in two opposite directions respectively about their longitudinal axes, massage tips carried by said shafts and movable toward and away from each other by alternate directions of rotation of said shafts, a force applying member operatively engageable with said shafts so as to apply a relatively steady and firm force thereto to partially rotate them in one direction, meansv to rotate said shafts in the opposite direction, and means to selectively vary the duration of application of force between said force applying rnember and said shafts.

12. A massage device, comprising, a housing having a lower and upper section, a shaft partially disposed in said lovver section and partially protruding therefrom, an arm on the immer end of said shaft, a massage member on die outer en-d thereof, an electric motor, a vertically reciprocating cross member operatively connected to said motor, said electric motor pivotally secured at one end to one end of said lower section so said cross member is spaced above and in line with said arm and capable of contacting the same in the downward stroke of its travel, said upper section attachable to said lower section to enclose said elentric motor, said motor when actuated causing said cross member to bear against said arm to partially rotate said shaft in one direction about its longitudinal axis, means to partially rotate said shaft in the other direction when said cross member moves upwardly away from said arm, and a manually rotatable screw means in said upper section threadably connected With the top sicle cf said elentric motor whereby said electric motor can be selectively raised and lowered an its pivot point to different fixecl positions within the lower section and thereby vary the distance beween said cross member and said arm to se1ectively change the duration of contact between the cross member and said arm during a given stroke of said cross member which correspondingly varies the degree of roter tion of said shaft.

13. A massage device, comprising, a housing having a lower and upper section, a shaft partially disposed in said lower section and partially protruding therefrom, an arm on the inner end of said shaft, a massage member 011 the outer end thereof, an eloctric motor, a vertically reciprocating cross rnember operatively connected to said motor, siad electric motor pivotally secured at one end to one end of said lower section so said cross member is spaced above and in line with said arm and capablo of contacting the sarne in the downward stroke of its travel, said upper section attaohable to said lower section to enclose said electric motor, said motor When actuated causing said cross member to bear against said arm to partially rotate said shaft in one direction about its longitudinal axis, means to selectivoly vary the duration of the downward stroke of said cross member to correspondingly vary the duration of bearing engagement of said cross member with said arm, and means to partically rotate said sha;ft in the other direction when said cross member mov =s upwardly away from said arm.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS London Aug. 31, 1937 Salit Dec. 31, 1940 Strome Apr. 10, 1945

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2091511 *Feb 5, 1937Aug 31, 1937Bessie LondonGum massaging and teeth exercising device
US2227276 *Jan 16, 1939Dec 31, 1940Jonah SalitGum massaging device
US2373430 *Apr 19, 1944Apr 10, 1945 Gum massager
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3197870 *Jan 31, 1963Aug 3, 1965Tofflemire Benjamin FDental separator
US3227158 *May 8, 1961Jan 4, 1966Aquatec CorpMethod and apparatus for oral hygiene
US3401685 *Nov 18, 1965Sep 17, 1968Olga StaubTherapeutic treatment of disorders of speech, particularly rhotacism and sigmatism
US3592188 *Mar 21, 1969Jul 13, 1971Barnett Forest HPower operated gum massager and tooth brush
US3750655 *Nov 8, 1971Aug 7, 1973Kolbel GVibration massaging method and device
US4282865 *Aug 13, 1979Aug 11, 1981Pogue William FApparatus for exercising a limb of a patient
US4348178 *Jul 31, 1978Sep 7, 1982Kurz Craven HVibrational orthodontic appliance
US4962758 *Jun 9, 1989Oct 16, 1990Jeffrey LasnerVibratory device for releasing air bubbles trapped in the heart muscle
US5484391 *Jan 14, 1994Jan 16, 1996Univ TempleDirect manual cardiac compression method
US5571074 *May 27, 1994Nov 5, 1996Temple University-Of The Commonwealth System Of Higher EducationInflatable and expandable direct manual cardiac compression device
US5582580 *May 27, 1994Dec 10, 1996Temple University - Of The Commonwealth System Of Higher EducationDirect manual cardiac compression device
US5931850 *Nov 13, 1995Aug 3, 1999Zadini; Filiberto P.(Percutaneous cardiac pump for cardiopulmonary resuscitation) cardiac resuscitation device for percutaneous direct cardiac massage
US6296653Oct 26, 1999Oct 2, 2001Filiberto P. ZadiniCardiac resuscitation device for percutaneous direct cardiac massage
US8206328 *Jun 26, 2012Adamson Christopher DLiposculpting device
US20080103419 *Oct 22, 2007May 1, 2008Adamson Christopher DLiposculpting Device
Classifications
U.S. Classification601/140, D24/200, 601/142
International ClassificationA61H7/00, A61H13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61H13/00, A61H7/004
European ClassificationA61H13/00, A61H7/00D4