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Publication numberUS2913241 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 17, 1959
Filing dateJan 18, 1957
Priority dateJan 18, 1957
Publication numberUS 2913241 A, US 2913241A, US-A-2913241, US2913241 A, US2913241A
InventorsRichard F Miner
Original AssigneeRichard F Miner
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adjustable motor supporting stand
US 2913241 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 17, 1959 R. F. MINER 2,913,241

ADJUSTABLE MOTOR SUPPORTING STAND Filed Jan. 18, 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVBNTOR Nov. 17, 1959 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jan. 18, 1957 cfl 5 a F M: 4' a v 7 w M U. Q m r; w I M f a u 1 H 3 INVENTOR ATTORNEY United States Patent ADJUSTABLE MOTOR SUPPORTING STAND Richard F. Miner, Superior, Iowa Application January 18, 1957, Serial No. 634,863 7 2 Claims. or. 269-185) This invention relates to a stand for supporting motors and which is adjustable for positioning the motor in various positions relative to the stand most convenient to a mechanic who is repairing the motor.

More particularly, it is a primaryobject of the present invention to provide a stand on which a motor can be secured and supported while being worked upon, and which is so constructed that a mechanic without assistance from others can readily adjust parts ofthe stand to vary the position and angular disposition of the motor for most conveniently situating it for work to be performed thereon.

Still a further object of the invention is to provide a motor supporting stand having manually regulated means for securing the several parts .of the stand in desired adjusted positions relative to one another so that the motor supported by the stand will be maintained in a selected position and will be held immovable when pressure or forces are applied thereto in connection with work being performed on the motor or engine.

Various other objects and advantages of the invention will hereinafter become more fully apparent from the following description of the drawings, illustrating a presently preferred embodiment thereof, and wherein:

Figure l is an elevational view of the stand;

Figure 2 is a fragmentary top plan view thereof, partly broken away and partly in section;

- Figure 3 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical sectional view taken substantially along a plane as indicated by the line 33 of Figure 2; i

Figure 4 is a fragmentary horizontal section view, taken substantially along a plane as indicated by the line 44 of Figure 3;

Figure 5 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical sectional view, taken substantially along a plane as indicated by the line 5-5 of Figure l;

Figure 6 is an enlarged fragmentary detailed vertical sectional view, taken substantially along a plane as indicated by the line 6-6 of Figure l, and

Figure 7 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view in detail, taken substantially along a plane as indicated by the line 77 of Figure 4.

Referring more specifically to the drawings, the adjustable motor supporting stand in its entirety and comprising the invention is designated generally 10 and includes a large base 11 the fiat underside of whichiscadapted to rest on a suitable supporting surface such as a floor, and

which is preferably provided with a number of openings 12 spaced from the center thereof and fromtone another to receive fastenings, not shown, to enable the base 11 to be anchored to a floor surface, if desired. An upright post or column 13 has a lower end suitably anchored to .the central portion of the base 11 and extends upwardly therefromand is disposed perpendicular thereto.

At least the upper end portion of the post or column 13 is of circular cross section. A yoke 14 has a central opening 15 through which the upper portion of the column or post 13 extends and is provided with a depending boss 16, which surrounds the opening 15 and which fits rotatably and slidably on the post 13. An adjustable clamping collar 17 is mounted on and clamped to the post 13 beneath the boss 16 and said boss engages thereon for swivelly mounting the yoke on the post 13. An ad-- justable upper clamping collar 18 is adjustably secured to the upper portion of the post and bears upon the yoke 14 around the opening 15 thereof to detachably retain said yoke on the post 13. A setscrew 19 is threaded radially through a part of the boss 16 and is adapted to be manually tightened against a part of the post 13, when it is desired to secure the yoke 14 against rotation.

The yoke 14 has upturned ends 20 and 21. The outer side of the yoke end 20 is disposed against an inner wall of a gear case 22 and is secured thereto by fastenings 23 and 24. The fastenings 24 comprise tie bolts which extend through the upper-portions of both upturned yoke ends 20 and 21 and which are secured to the gear case 22 for securing said gear case to the yoke 14 and to retain the yoke ends 20 and 21 in parallel relation to one another. A shaft 25 extends loosely through the yoke ends 20 and 21 above the collar 18 and the upper end of the post 13, and has one end thereof extending into the gear case 22, as best seen in Figure 2. The shaft 25 is journaled in the inner gear case wall and in the yoke ends 20 and 21.

A worm gear, designated generally 26 and best illustrated in Figure 3, is contained within the gear case 22 and includes a relatively large worm wheel 27 through the center of which extends the end of the shaft 25 which extends into the gear case 22. The'worm wheel 27 is keyed as seen at 28 to said shaft end 25. The worm gear 26 also includes a worm 29 which meshes with the worm wheel 27 and which constitutes a part of a shaft 30. Shaft 30 has a restricted end 31 which is journaled in a bearing opening 32 of the gear case 22 and a restricted opposite end 33 which extends through and is journaled in a small detachably mounted closure plate 34 of the gear case 22. A hand crank 35 is secured to the shaft end 33 outwardly of the plate 34. The gear case 22 has a detachable outer wall forming a cover plate 36 which is removable to expose the worm gear 26 and to permit the parts thereof to be applied to or removed from the gear case.

The shaft 25 has a somewhat enlarged opposite end portion 37 which extends outwardly from the yoke end 21 and to which is secured a motor or engine mounting bracket, designated generally 38. In the embodiment as shown, the mounting bracket is adapted for use in mounting an outboard motor but may also be utilized for mounting other types of motors and other forms of mounting brackets may be employed. The mounting bracket 38, as disclosed, includes a rigid backing plate 39 one end portion of which overlies the shaft end 37 and is secured thereto in any suitable manner, as by side thereof opposite the side to which the shaft end 37 is connected. A clamp screw engaging wear plate 43 may be secured by fastenings 44 to the outer or front side of the bracket piece 41.

A friction brake 45 includes a collar 46 which fits loosely around a part of the worm shaft 31 which is disposed between the worm 29 and the shaft end 33. Said collar has an integral outwardly extending hollow neck 47 which opens into the bore thereof and which is internally threaded. The collar 46. and neck 47 form the housing of the brake 45 and said neck 47 extends radially from the shaft 30 and has an outer part extending loosely through an opening 48' in the gear case cover 36 to prevent rotation of the collar 46 with the shaft 30. A sleeve 49 is threadedly mounted in the hollow neck 47. A brake shoe 50 is slidably mounted in the inner end of the sleeve 49 and has an inner end face 51 which is shaped to conformably fit against a portion of the shaft 30, as seen in Figure 7, and due to the shape of the face 51 and its contact with the shaft 30, prevents the slidably mounted brake shoe 58 from turning in the sleeve 49, as, clearly illustrated in Figure 7. A plug 52 forming a spring stop is adjustably mounted threadedly in the outer end of the sleeve 49. A compression spring 53 is disposed in the sleeve 49 between the stop 52 and brake shoe 59 for yieldably holding the brake shoe face 51 in contact with the shaft 30. Pressure exerted by the brake shoe against the shaft can be varied by adjustment of the spring stop 52.

The inner wall of the gear casing 22 is provided with an internally threaded boss 54 which is disposed in alignment with the brake 45 to receive a locking screw 55 which is threaded inwardly therethrough. The inner end of the locking screw 55 can be advanced inwardly into engagement with the collar 46 to force said collar tightly against the shaft 30 to positively prevent the shaft from turning relative to the brake 45.

A portion of an outboard motor 56 is shown supported by the mounting bracket 38 and includes a clamp 57 which engages over said mounting bracket 38. The clamp screws 58 of the clamp 57 are advanced inwardly to bring the heads 59 which are swivelly mounted on the inner ends of the screws 58 into tight engagement against the plate 43 for securing the outboard motor clamp 57 immovably to the bracket 38.

As best seen in Figure l, a flexible: element 60 of substantial strength and preferably possessing some elasticity is anchored at one end as seen at 61 to an end of the mounting bracket 38 and has a snap hook 62, at its other free end which detachably engages an eye fastening 63 which is anchored in the mounting bracket 38, near the other end thereof. The flexible element 60 is en gaged around the outer side of the drive shaft housing of the outboard motor and functions to prevent said housing from swinging away from the plane of the mounting bracket 38, when said mounting bracket is swung toward a horizontal position with the base plate 3? dis posed beneath the bracket piece 41.

From the foregoing it will be readily apparent that the yoke 14 may be swiveled on the post 13 to position the mounting bracket 38 and the motor 56. supported thereby in any desired position around the post 13, where most accessible to a mechanic, or where the best lighting or illumination is available. if desired, the setscrew 19 can be tightened to secure the yoke immovably to the post 13 to retain the mounting bracket 38 and motor 56 in a desired position relative to the post. The crank 35 may then be manually turned to turn the shaft 25 in a desired direction through the worm gear drive 26 for rotating the mounting bracket 38 in either direction to position the motor 56 at any desired angle most convenient to be worked upon. The worm gear 26 will enable a heavy motor supported on the mounting bracket 33 to be turned with only a slight force required to turn the crank 35, so that one man can easily effect desired angular adjustments of heavy motors or engines which are supported on the mounting bracket 38. The spring stop 52 is adjusted so that the brake shoe will have suflicient frictional engagement with the shaft 30 to normally retain the shaft 25 in any position of rotation to which it is moved, yet will not prevent the crank 35 being readily turned manually. Additionally, if desired and to insure retention of the motor at a selected angle, the locking screw can be advanced inwardly against the brake collar 46 to cause said collar to grip the shaft 30 so that the shaft 25 will be positively retained against rotation.

Various modifications and changes are contemplated and may be resorted to, without departing from the function or scope of the invention as hereinafter defined by the appended claims.

I claim as myinvention:

1. A manually operated adjustable motor supporting stand comprising, a base, a post fixed to and rising perpendicularly from said base, a yoke, means swivelly mounting said yoke on the upper portion of said post, said yoke including upstanding substantially parallel ends extending to above the level of the upper end of said post, a gear case supported by said yoke, said gear case being mounted on and secured to an outer side of one of said yoke ends, a worm gear contained in said gear case including a worm wheel and worm, a shaft extending through and turnably mounted in said yoke ends, above the upper end of said post, and having an end portion disposed turnably in the gearcase and fixed to the worm wheel, said shaft having an opposite end projecting outwardly from the other yoke end, a motor mounting bracket secured to said last mentioned shaft end, a crank secured to an extension of said worm and disposed externally of the gear case for rotating the shaft to revolve the motor mounting bracket about the axis of said shaft, said yoke being rotatable about said post for moving said motor mounting bracket to various positions around the post, an adjustable friction brake mounted in the gear case, said brake including a collar fitting around the worm. extension, a hollow neck extending from a part of the periphery of the collar and having a portion slidably disposed in a wall of the gear case, a brake shoe slidably mounted in said hollow neck and having an inner end extending into the collar and bearing against the worm extension, adjustable spring means disposed in the hollow neck and urging the brake shoe into engagement with the worm extension for resisting rotation of the worm extension, and a locking screw threadedly mounted in the gear case and disposed opposite to and substantially in alignment with the hollow neck, said locking screw being displaceable into engagement with said collar for moving the collar into tight frictional engagement with the worm extension to lock the worm against rotation.

2. A manually operated adjustable motor supporting stand comprising, a base, a post fixed to and rising perpendicularly from said base, a yoke, means swivelly mounting said yoke on the upper portion of said post, said yoke including upstanding substantially parallel ends extending to above the level of the. upper end of said post, a gear case supported by said yoke, said gear case being mounted. on and secured to an outer side of one of said yoke ends, a worm gear contained in said gear case including a worm wheel and worm, a shaft extending through and turnably mounted in said yoke ends, above the upper end of said post, and having an end portion disposed turnably in the gear case and fixed to the worm wheel, said shaft having an opposite end projecting outwardly from the other yoke end, a motor mounting bracket secured to said last mentioned shaft end, a crank secured to an extension of said worm and disposed externally of the gear case for rotating the shaft to revolve the motor mounting bracket about the axis of said shaft, said yoke being rotatable about said post for moving saidmotor mounting bracket to various positions around the post, said motor mounting bracket comprising an elongated substantially fiat member having its longitudinal axis disposed substantially parallel to the axis of the shaft and adapted to be engaged by-an outboard motor mounting clamp for mounting an outboard motor thereon, said motor mounting bracket being secured adjacent one end thereof to the shaft and extending outwardly from said last mentioned shaft end.

1,344,385 Crays June 22, 1920 I 6 Randall Oct. 7, 1930 Bahrman Oct. 6, 1931 Vollmer Jan. 25, 1938 Henry Jan. 26, 1938 Staley Feb. 1, 1944 Scott et a1. July 18, 1950 FOREIGN PATENTS France Nov. 25, 1925 France Mar. 29, 1927 (Addition)

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1344385 *Mar 24, 1919Jun 22, 1920Claude C StoneMotor-buck
US1777935 *Dec 27, 1928Oct 7, 1930Randall Claude HStand for outboard motors
US1826493 *Jul 23, 1930Oct 6, 1931Leonard Bahrman SEngine head stand
US2106367 *Aug 21, 1936Jan 25, 1938H & H Machine & Motor Parts CoMotor-block stand
US2106525 *Jul 23, 1936Jan 25, 1938J G Brill CoUniversal tool holder
US2340707 *Nov 17, 1941Feb 1, 1944Staley Joseph HShop engine stand revolving means
US2515428 *Jan 25, 1946Jul 18, 1950Scott Atwater Mfg CompanyOutboard motor support and package
FR32070E * Title not available
FR606871A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3212770 *Oct 12, 1962Oct 19, 1965Stephens Jaffery GAdjustable rotatable cylinder head support
US3355162 *Jun 7, 1966Nov 28, 1967Kerr Robert MRepair stand
US3628761 *Oct 1, 1969Dec 21, 1971Charles Supper Co IncGoniometer head for x-ray diffraction apparatus with improved x- or y-motion mechanism
US3902575 *Apr 1, 1974Sep 2, 1975Crc Crose Int IncProtective braking means for precision mechanisms
US4254946 *Jun 29, 1979Mar 10, 1981Kerr Robert MLower unit repair fixture
US4366954 *Feb 9, 1981Jan 4, 1983Cash Donald ROutboard motor support frame
US4771980 *Dec 14, 1987Sep 20, 1988Dubbs Ronald JStand and support for small engines
US5562271 *Dec 9, 1994Oct 8, 1996Davis, Jr.; William M.Apparatus for mounting a transmission on an engine stand
Classifications
U.S. Classification269/59, 269/71, 269/51, 269/61, 269/76, 269/309, 248/640
International ClassificationB25H1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB25H1/0007
European ClassificationB25H1/00B