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Publication numberUS2913992 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 24, 1959
Filing dateOct 29, 1957
Priority dateOct 29, 1957
Publication numberUS 2913992 A, US 2913992A, US-A-2913992, US2913992 A, US2913992A
InventorsDouglas Johnston, John Blue, Larry Tangeman
Original AssigneeJohn Blue Company Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hose pump
US 2913992 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

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Nov. 24, 1959 J. BLUE E-TAL 2,913,992

HOSE PUMP Filed Oct. 29, 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG. 1'.

INVENTORS JOHN BLUE DOUGL AS JOHNSTON 5 LARRY TANGEMAN ATTORNEYS Nov. 24, 1959 BLUE EIAL HOSE PUMP Filed Oct. 29, 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTORS JOHN B E DOUGL JOHNSTON LARRY TAN GEMAN ATTORNEYS I United States Patent-O HOSE PUMP John Blue, Douglas Johnston, and ,Larry Tangeman, Huntsville, Ala., assignors to John Blue Company, Incorporated, Huntsville, Ala., a corporation of Alabama Application October 29, 1957, Serial No. 693,071

9 8 Claims. (Cl.- 103-149) This invention relates to pumps and more particularly to hose-type pumps embodying one ormore flexible tubes or hoses having rollers arranged to move into engagement with the sameso as to progressively compress the hoses to squeeze successive charges of liquid or gases therefrom. lt -is an Object of the present inventio n to provide a hose-type pump particularly adapted foruse inconveying liquid fertilizer or the like from a sourceof supply to a' hose pump, the'liquid is contacted or retained in the pump by the hoses, which canwbe readily made of an inertmaterial. Moreover, hose pumps are particularly suited to this purpose due to the .fact that liquid can be delivered through-several. lines at anequal rate so as to insure that anequal amount of fertilizerwill be delivered to-eachapplicator. t m Accordingly, another object of the present :invention is to provide a pump of the type describedzwhichis 'arranged to have connectedv therewith various desired numbers, of hoses. within a :given range andimproved means for modifying the squeeze; pressure applied to the hoses inaccordancewith the number utilized. j}

Still'another-object of the present invention is the provisionof a pump of the type described which is simple but eflic ient in operation andeconomical to manufacture and maintain. j

v 'Iheseand other objects of the presentinyention will become more apparent during. the course ofthe following detailed description and appended claims. a The-invention may best be understood with. reference to the accompanying drawings wherein an illustrative embodiment is shown.

. In the drawings: 1 I i Figure l is a rear elevational view of a pumpembodying. the principles of the present invention;

;; Figure 2 is a front elevational view of the pumpyand f Figure 31 is a cross-sectional view of the pump taken along the line 3-3 of Figure 1.

Referring now more particularly toth e, drawings, there 2,913,992 Patented Nov. 24, 1959 ice outwardly extending flange portion 22 parallel with the end wall 14 and the opposite semi-cylindrical wall 20 is provided with a similar flange 24. Extending between the upper ends of the flanges 22 and 24 is an upper wall 26 having an upper portion 28 disposed adjacent the upper edges of the flanges and a lower portion 30 disposed adjacent the lower edges of the flanges. A lower wall 32 extends between the lower ends of the flanges 22 and 24 and has a downwardly extending portion 34, the end of which is integral with a pair of downwardly extending mounting flanges 36 and 38 disposed in alignment with the flanges 22 and 24 respectively.

The lower end of the mounting flanges 36 and 38 are secured to a pair of brackets 40 and 42, preferably of L-shaped configuration, as by bolts 44 or the like. Secured between the L-shaped brackets in spaced relation to "the mounting flanges 36 and 38 is an intake manifold, generally. indicated at 46, which is preferably in the form of a cylindrical member 48 having a pair of lugs 50 and 52 depending from opposite end portions thereof for securement to the respective mounting brackets 40 and 42, as by bolts 54 or the like. Extending radially outwardly from the tube is a plurality of hose nipples 56 upon which one end of a plurality of hoses or tubes 58 are arranged to be secured by any suitable means, such as clamps 60 or the like.

While it will be understood that any number of hoses or tubes may be utilized, in the drawings there are shown six such tubes. The present pump is particularly adapted for use in feeding liquid fertilizer to applicator implements and such implements usually embody six applicators or less.

Each of the hoses or tubes 58 extends from the intake manifold 46 over the lower wall 32 of the frame and upwardly in a semi-circular configuration into contact with the lower portion 30 of the upper wall 26. The upper ends of the hoses are connected with nipples 62 by any suitable means, such as clamps 64, which nipples are rigidly secured, as by welding or the like, intermediate their ends to one leg 66 of an L-shaped member 68. The L-shaped member .68 includes an upward, generally horizontally extending leg 70 provided with a pair of bayonet-type slots 72 for receiving bolts 74 extending is shown a pump, generally indicated at 10, which embodies ,the principles of the present invention. T he pump includes a main frame or housing 12, whichis preferably formed asa single casting. The frame provides a pair of end walls 14 and16 of generally semicircular configuration, the end wall 14 having a short inwardlyextendin'g'semi-cylindrical wall 18 on the outer periphery thereof and the end wall 16 having a similar short peripheral wall 20 extending inwardly from the periphery thereof; The semi-cylindrical wall 18 terminates in jan through the upper portion of the upper wall of the frame andhaving wing nuts 75 threaded thereon. It will be understood that the opposite ends of the nipples 62 are arranged to receive additional hoses (not shown) for carrying the liquid delivered through the hoses 58 outwardly to desired points of discharge.

The liquid is forced through the hoses 58 by the cooperationof a rotor, generally indicated at 76, with a resiliently mounted backing plate, indicated at 78, by progressively squeezing the hoses substantially throughout their longitudinal extent between their ends.

The rotor 76 includes a shaft 80 journaled in suitable bosses 82 and 84 formed in the end walls 14 and 16 respectively. Mounted on the shaft 80 adjacent the end wall 14, as by set screw 86 or the like, is a three-armed spider element 88 and a similar three-armed spider element 90 is secured to the shaft 80, as by a set screw 92 adjacent the end wall16. It will be noted that the spider elements 88 and 90 are adapted to rotate in the plane of the semi-cylindrical walls 18 and 20. Extending between each pair of corresponding arms of the spider elements 88 plate includes a semi-cylindrical interior surface 96, against which the curved portions of the hoses 58 engage. The upper end of the plate includes an upper offset flange 98 which is arranged to engage the end of the lower portion 30 of the upper wall 26. In a like manner, the lower end of the plate 78 includes an offset flange 100, winch is arranged to engage the end of the lower wall 32. The offset flanges 98 and 100 serve to limit the inward movement of the plate to an inward limiting position wherein the semi-cylindrical surface 96 is aligned with the adjacent surface of the upper and lower walls so that the latter extend tangentially therefrom.

The plate 78 is resiliently urged into its limiting position by upper and lower spring assemblies 102 and 104. Each of the assemblies includes a bar 106 having its ends bent inwardly and apertured to receive bolts 108 extending through suitable apertured lugs formed on the semi-cylindrical walls 18 and 20 respectively and pro- "vided with wing nuts 109. Each of the bars has a pair of longitudinally spaced, inwardly extending projections 110 formed thereon, each of which receives one end of a coil spring 112. The opposite end of each coil spring 112 surrounds a projection 114 extending from a boss 116 formed integrally on the exterior surface of the plate 78.

Operation It will be seen that by rotating the rotor 76, the rollers 94 will be moved through a circular orbit in engagement with the hoses 58. The backing plate 78 is resiliently urged into its limiting position by the coil. springs 112 which serve to provide a yielding backup pressure for the hoses. As the rollers proceed through their orbit, the hoses are progressively squeezed against the backing plate in a direction away from the intake manifold, which moves the liquid trapped therein outwardly through the discharge nipples 62. The hoses or tubes 58 are made of a flexible material, preferably neoprene or the like, and after their progressive engagement of the rollers, they assume their normal position, which results in the intake of liquid from the intake manifold 46. The next succeeding roller traps the liquid which fills up the hoses, and progressively moves this liquid toward the discharge nipples and in this way, continued rotation serves to discharge successive charges of liquid squeezed out by the engagement of the rollers with the hoses.

It will be noted that the rotor includes three rollers which are spaced 120 apart. Preferably, the semi-cylindrical surface 96 of the backing plate has an extent greater than 120", preferably of the order of 165 so that before the roller adjacent the discharge end of the plate leaves, the succeeding roller will have moved into engagement with the intake end of the plate. In this way, the pump is self-stopping. That is, not matter in what position the rotor stops, at least one roller will be in engagement with the hoses, squeezing them closed so as to prevent flow.

As noted above, the present pump is particularly adapted for use in feeding liquid fertilizer and the like to applicator implements, such as utilized in conventional farm equipment. In such use, the pump is mounted on the frame of the implement, which is generally pulled in trail-behind relation by a tractor and the rotor is connected through suitable power transmission chain with the ground wheel of the tractor or applicator vehicle. The intake manifold has one end interiorly threaded so as to receive a suitable plug, while the other is connected to the source of liquid fertilizer supply, as by a hose or the like. Additional hoses are connected with the outlet side of the discharge nipple 62 and are extended to the respective applicators. It will be noted that with the use of the present pump, the amount of liquid fertilizer delivered to each applicator will be at all times equal.

A significant feature of the present invention in connection with fertilizer applicators is that the present pump readily adapts itself for use with farm equipment of this type embodying only four applicators. For such an installation, hoses not needed are simply discharged back into the tank or the middle two holes are eliminated and the corresponding inlet manifold nipples 56 are plugged by suitable caps or the like (not shown). It should be noted that the springs 112 are arranged to provide a predetermined pressure to the hoses as a result of their engagement by the rotor rollers. Where only four hoses are employed, this predetermined pressure must be proportionately reduced. In order to effect this reduction in the spring pressure, suitable shims (not shown) are mounted between the ends of the bars 106 and the lugs of the adjacent semi-cylindrical walls 18 and 20. It is contemplated that a commercial embodiment of the present pump would be packaged with shims of proper size to proportion the spring pressures properly to correspond with the utilization of only four hoses. Of course, the plugs for the intake nipples would also be included.

The hoses are mounted in engagement with the plate 78 so that'they are free from tension and in this way, their life is considerably extended. However, when the machine is to be idle for an extended period of time, it is recommended that the wing nuts 109 and the wing nuts 75 be loosened so as to permit the member 68 to be moved relative to the upper wall 26 until the bolts 74 are disposed in the opposite end of the bayonet slots 72'. Since the plate 78'is, therefore, relatively free to move outwardly, the central portions of the hoses will be dis posed out of the orbital path .of movement of'the rollers so that they do not remain in squeezed condition when the rotor assumes a position wherein one roller is dis-. posed midway of the plate.

It thus will be seen that the objects of this invention have been fully and effectively accomplished. It will be realized, however, that the foregoing specific embodiment has been shown and described only for the purpose of illustrating the principles of this invention and is subject to extensive change without departure from such principles. Therefore, this invention includes all modifications encompassed within the spirit and scope of the following claims. a

We claim:

1. A pump of the type described comprising a frame having side walls and circumferentially spaced longitudinal walls interconnecting said side walls, said walls defining an opening, a rotor journaled in said side walls and having a plurality of circumferentially spaced rollers movable about the axis of said rotor, a plate having an interior surface arcuate about the axis of said rotor,

means mounting said plate in said opening with said surface adjacent the path of movement of said rollers for resilient yielding movement away from said axis, said plate including offset flanges at opposite ends thereof engaging said longitudinal walls to limit the inward 'movement of said plate and a hose carried by said frame in engagement with said surface, said hose engaging said surface an arcuate distance greater than the arcuate distance between adjacent rollers.

2. A pump as defined in claim 1 wherein said longitudinal walls include interior surfaces forming tangential continuations of said plate surface when the latter is disposed in its limiting position.

3. A pump of the type described'comprising a frame, a rotor journaled in said frame and having a plurality of circumferentially spaced rollers movable about the axis of said rotor, an intake manifold carried by said frame, a plurality of parallel hoses connected at one end to said intake manifold, a member carried by said frame in circumferentially spaced relation to said intake manifold for receiving the opposite ends of said hoses, means for mounting said member on said frame for movement in the direction of extent of said opposite hose ends between operative and inoperative positions, the positions of said hoses between their ends being arcuate and disposed in the path of movement of said rollers, a plate disposed in engagement with the arcuate portions of said hoses, and means mounting said plate on said frame for resilient yielding movement in response to the movement of said rollers through their path into engagement with said hose portions.

4. A pump as defined in claim 3 wherein said member mounting means comprises a pair of bolts carried by said frame, said member having bayonet slots formed therein receiving said bolts.

5. A pump as defined in claim 3 wherein said plate mounting means comprises a pair of bars secured to said frame and extending over said plate and coil springs between said bars and said plate.

6. A pump as defined in claim 5 including bolts securing said bars to said frame, said bolts permitting the plate to be moved into an outwardly disposed inoperative position.

7. A pump of the type described comprising a frame having side walls and circumferentially spaced longitudinal walls interconnecting said side walls, said walls defining an opening, a rotor journaled in said side walls and having a plurality of circumferentially spaced rollers movable about the axis of said rotor, a plate having an interior surface arcuate about the axis of said rotor, means mounting said plate in said opening with said surface adjacent the path of movement of said rollers for resilient yielding movement away from said axis, said plate mounting means comprising circumferentially spaced bars secured to said side walls and extending over said plate and coil springs between said bars and said plate, and a hose carried by said frame in engagement with said surface, said hose engaging said surface an arcuate distance greater than the arcuate distance between adjacent rollers.

8. A pump of the type described comprising aframe, a rotor journaled in said frame and having a plurality of circumferentially spaced rollers movable about the axis of said rotor, an intake manifold carried by said frame, a plurality of parallel hoses connected at one end to said intake manifold, a member carried by said frame in circumferentially spaced relation to said intake manifold for receiving the opposite ends of said hoses, means for mounting said member on said frame for movement in the direction of extent of said opposite hose ends between operative and inoperative positions, the positions of said hoses between their ends being arcuate and disposed in the path of movement of said rollers, a plate disposed in engagement with the arcuate portions of said hoses, and means for effecting a resilient yielding movement between said plate and said rollers in response to the movement of said rollers through their path into engagement with said hose portions.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 315,667 Serdinko Apr. 14, 1885 453,277 Nickerson June 2, 1891 1,988,337 Santiago Jan. 15, 1935 FOREIGN PATENTS 467,288 Great Britain June 15, 1937 854,088 France Apr. 4, 1940

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US315667 *Oct 20, 1884Apr 14, 1885 Rotary force-pump
US453277 *Jun 20, 1890Jun 2, 1891 Vacuum-pump
US1988337 *Feb 21, 1934Jan 15, 1935Cordeiro Santiago ManoelPump
FR854088A * Title not available
GB467288A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3079868 *Nov 25, 1960Mar 5, 1963Ormsby Thomas FFlexible hose pump
US3101674 *Dec 20, 1960Aug 27, 1963Technicon InstrMultiple-tube pump
US3122103 *Oct 24, 1961Feb 25, 1964Ormsby Thomas FFlexible hose pump with resiliently pressed rollers
US3353491 *Sep 28, 1965Nov 21, 1967Bastian James WPumping device
US3403631 *Mar 28, 1967Oct 1, 1968Dempster Ind IncFlow metering and dividing device
US3565286 *Oct 18, 1968Feb 23, 1971Cryogenic Technology IncLiquid programming and pumping apparatus
US4473173 *Jan 10, 1983Sep 25, 1984Applied Color Systems, Inc.Apparatus and method for low volume dispensing
US4834630 *Feb 16, 1988May 30, 1989Godwin Darwin DPeristaltic pump
US5257917 *Oct 2, 1992Nov 2, 1993Cole-Parmer Instrument CompanyPeristaltic pump having means for reducing flow pulsation
Classifications
U.S. Classification417/475, 417/477.1
International ClassificationF04B43/00, F04B43/12
Cooperative ClassificationF04B43/1284, F04B43/0072, F04B43/1292
European ClassificationF04B43/12G10, F04B43/00D8T, F04B43/12G8