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Publication numberUS2915062 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 1, 1959
Filing dateApr 25, 1955
Priority dateApr 25, 1955
Publication numberUS 2915062 A, US 2915062A, US-A-2915062, US2915062 A, US2915062A
InventorsButler William F, Willet Richard H
Original AssigneeCutter Lab
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Blood donor assembly
US 2915062 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W. F. BUTLER ETAL Dec. 1, 1959 BLOOD DONOR ASSEMBLY 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed April 25, 1955 INVENTORS WILLIAM F. BUTLER RICHARD H. WILL ET ECKHOF'F 5! SLICK ATTORNEYS 5y Zblu.) 0

THE F A MEMBEP a;

Dec. 1, 1959 w. F. BUTLER ET AL 2,915,062

BLOOD DONOR ASSEMBLY Filed April 25, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 ffh za 1 h/za INVENTORS WILL/AM F- BUTLER Ii 5.9 mam/2a H. WILL ET ECKHOFF 5s" SLICK ATTORNEYS A MEMBER OF THE. F/z

United States Patent" BLOOD DONOR ASSEMBLY william-FeButler and Richard H. Willet, Oakland, Calif,

.assignors to Cutter Laboratories, Inc., a corporation of California This invention relates to apparatus useful for the transfer of fluids and particularly to, a blood donor assembly.

The apparatus of the present invention is relatively simple and inexpensive to manufacture so that, for example, after a single use, it can be discarded. At the same time, the apparatus is' easy to manipulate and is quite rugged; in addition, the apparatus of the present invention is one in which the several components are of the same internal diameter so that blood flows through it with a minimum of agitation or mechanical working due to the absence of any constriction or enlargement. This last is a matter of considerable importance in the collection of blood and in the giving of blood in a transfusion.

The invention includes other objects and features of advantage,'some of which, together with the foregoing, will appear hereinafter wherein the present preferred form of apparatus embodying the invention is disclosed. Referring to the drawings accompanying and forming a part hereof:

Figure 1 is a side elevation of the apparatus assembly.

Figure 2 is a plan view of the cannula prior to use.

Figure 3 is a side elevation partly in section through the cannula with the holder removed.

Figure 4 is a side elevation partly in section. through the intravenous needle, while Figure 5 is a fragmentary perspective view showing the manner of manipulating the cannula.

Figure 6 is a front View of the cannula manipulating means.

Figure 7 is a front view of the cannula manipulating means with a portion thereof broken away, while Figure 8 is a rear view of the cannula manipulating means.

Figure 9 is a section through the cannula and a sheath utilized to protect the cannula.

Referring to the drawings, the apparatus assembly includes an intravenous needle 6, a cannula 7, the needle and the cannula being connected by means including a length of a flexible tubing 8. The tubing is preferably of a transparent plastic and, as will be observed, the tubing, the cannula, and the needle have the same bore diameter and are connected without any enlargement or constriction.

Referring particularly to Figure 3, attachment of the flexible plastic tube 8 to the cannula 7 is effected by slipping a portion of the flexible tube 8 over the end of the needle 7 and placing'a sleeve 9 over the end of the plastic tubing and about a portion of the cannula 7 immediately beyond the end of the tubing 8. The sleeve is then crimped as at 10 and at 11, to engage the sleeve positively with the cannula in a tight mechanical fit and to compress an intermediate portion of the plastic tube 8 securely on the cannula.

The intravenous needle 6 is attached to the flexible plastic tube 8 in much the same manner by a sleeve 12; however, the sleeve 12 includes an enlarged tubular portion 14, which extends in spaced relation to the flexible tube 8, as appears in Figure 4, and provides a convenient Patented Dec. 1, 1959 needle in a tight mechanical fit while the crimping 18,

compresses the intermediate portion of the tube against the needle shaft..

To assist in manipulation of the cannula, the end of sleeve 9 is formed with a screw thread 19 and the latter is engaged with a cannula holding and manipulating device, generally indicated at 21. This device is fashioned of a single strip of resilient metal bent upon itself,.as is shown particularly in Figures 6-8, to provide oppositely extending ears 22 and 23, ear 22 being formed in position to be engaged adjacent the first knuckle of the forefinger on the hand of an operator, as is shown in Figure 5, while ear, 23 is adapted to be engaged with the end of the thumb. Immediately above the ears, the metal strip is joined upon itself to provide a base 24 having spaced ears 26 and 27 provided at each end thereof to receive hub 9 on cannula 7. Bar 27 includes an aperture to receive the forward portion of the hub while car 26 includes an aperture cooperating with the screw thread 19 and acting as a threaded receptacle into which the hub can be screwed to provide a definite and posi tive mounting for the cannula 7 on the manipulating device 21. The rear end of the manipulating member 21 is bent into a rearwardly extending portion 28, having a slot 29 therein through which the flexible tubing 8 extends. The manipulating member 21 also includes an arcuately formed rearward portion 31 having a narrow V-shaped slot 32 therein into which the tubing can be.

while the other is obstructed with a plug 34 of cotton or the like so that the atmosphere in the cannula, needle and tube may .be exhausted and replaced by a sterile one and the apparatus maintained in a sterile condition.

As is well-known and as is understood by physicians and others skilled in the art, it is customary to extend one needle of such a set into the vein of a donor; the opposite needle of the set is caused to penetrate a sealed container, the interior of which is conveniently evacuated so that a slight, negative pressure is placed upon the vein of the donor. Such a container is typically illustrated in Figure 5 by reference numeral 36. The receptacle 36 includes a neck portion 37, closed by a resilient stopper 38, the latter having upper and lower faces 39 and 41 with aligned pairs of recesses 42 and 43 positioned therein and separated only by a thin resilient diaphragm 44. The material of which the stopper 38 is made is of such resilient material that cannula 7 can be readily inserted while, upon withdrawal of the cannula, the material immediately seals itself.

When it is desired to use the apparatus, the tubing is drawn into the V-shaped slot 32 to prevent any flow in the tubing. The sterile covering usually provided upon the stopper 33 is removed and the stopper further sterilized, if desired; the sheath 33 is removed from the cannula 7, which is being gripped as is shown in Figure 5. The operator then provides a forcing pressure on the cannula sufficient to cause it to penetrate the diaphragm 44 and thus establish connection to the interior of the sterilized container 36. The fingers of the operator grip readily the base portion 28 and the side portion 24, while the end of the thumb and the first joint of the forefinger provide adequate pressure suflicient to force cannula 7 through-the resilient diaphragm 44. The site of the vena puncture is selected and the surface is sterilized in accordance with the usual and well-known technique. The sheath 33 is then stripped from the needle 6 and the latter is then inserted into the vein of the donor utilizing the sleeve 12 as the manipulating means. When the shut-off provided by the engagement of the tubing 8 with the V-shaped slot 32 is reelased, the interior of the tube 8 is placed under the reduced pressure of the receptacle 36 and blood is caused to flow into the vessel. This is continued for as long as desired. During the course of passage of the blood, a single continuous passage is provided which is free from constriction and enlargements. Therefore, the blood, in flowing through this passage, is not subjected to repeated changes in flow rate and is therefore free from any buffeting, accelerated flow or decelerated flow; thus, the blood collected in the receptacle 36 is free of any of the detriments which may attend such mechanical handling of blood.

The flow of fluid through the tube 8 is readily controlled by forcing tube 8 into the V-shaped slot 32 in the rear of device 21. Cannula 7 is readily withdrawn from the stopper 33 in the collection flask 36 by again grasping the device 21 in the manner shown in Figure 5, the arcuately formed rear edge of the member enabling a rearward withdrawing pressure to be exerted readily.

From the foregoing, we believe it will be apparent that we have provided a novel, simple and improved blood donor assembly construction.

We claim:

1. In a blood donor assembly, a needle having a pointed end and another end, a tubing ensleeved in frictional engagement over the other end of the needle and a portion of the needle spaced from the pointed end of the needle, and a sleeve extended over the tubing from a position beyond the other end of the needle to a position beyond the end of the tubing on the needle the sleeve being crimped adjacent one end into tight mechanical engagement with the needle and being crimped intermediate its length to engage forcefully the ensleeved tubing with the needle, the end of the sleeve having a screw thread formed on the outer surface thereof adjacent that end of the sleeve away from the needle end.

2. In a blood donor assembly, a needle having a pointed end and another end, a tubing ensleeved in frictional engagement over the other end of the needle and a portion of the needle spaced from the pointed end of the needle, and a sleeve extended over the tubing from a position beyond the other end of the needle to a position beyond the end of the tubing on the needle, the sleeve being crimped adjacent one end into tight mechanical engagement with the needle and being crimped intermediate its length to engage forcefully the ensleeved tubing with the needle, the end of the sleeve having a screw thread formed on the outer surface thereof adjacent that end of the sleeve away from the needle end, and a manipulating device for mounting said needle and enabling an operator to grip the same to effect axial movement of said needle, said device including opposite spaced portions each having an aperture therein, one aperture being adapted to receive said sleeve and the other aperture securing in looking engagement the screw thread on the sleeve.

3. In a blood donor assembly, a needle having a pointed end and another end, a tubing ensleeved in frictional engagement over the other end of the needle and a portion of the needle spaced from the pointed end of the needle, a sleeve extended over the tubing from a position beyond the other end of the needle to a position beyond the end of the tubing on the needle, the sleeve being crimped adjacent one end in tight mechanical engagement with the needle and being crimped intermediate its length to engage forcefully the ensleeved tubing with the needle, and a manipulating device mounted on said sleeve and including oppositely extending arcuately formed portions adapted to be grasped by a thumb and forefinger on the hand of an operator to enable the operator to exert axial pressure on the needle, said manipulating device including a tapered slot therein for reception of the tubing to control fluid flow through the tubing.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,682,874 Hickey July 6, 1954 2,689,564 Adams et a1. Sept. 21, 1954 2,712,822 Gewecke July 12, 1955 2,715,402 Wotton Aug. 16, 1955 2,716,982 Ryan Sept. 6, 1955 2,722,932 Hickey Nov. 8, 1955 2,794,435 Stevens June 4, 1957

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2682874 *May 13, 1953Jul 6, 1954Bishop & Co Platinum Works JTransfusion equipment
US2689564 *Nov 29, 1951Sep 21, 1954Becton Dickinson CoBlood donor assembly
US2712822 *May 21, 1954Jul 12, 1955Baxter Laboratories IncNeedle hub
US2715402 *Apr 16, 1954Aug 16, 1955United Carr Fastener CorpTransfusion equipment
US2716982 *Dec 26, 1951Sep 6, 1955Abbott LabVenoclysis equipment
US2722932 *May 12, 1954Nov 8, 1955Bishop & Co Platinum Works JDisposable blood donor set
US2794435 *Jul 31, 1952Jun 4, 1957Stevens Peter ANeedle terminal assembly
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4364387 *Dec 18, 1980Dec 21, 1982Abbott LaboratoriesConnecting device for medical liquid containers
US4643389 *Dec 27, 1984Feb 17, 1987American Hospital Supply CorporationTubing occlusion clip
US5249610 *Aug 7, 1992Oct 5, 1993Robert CassouSingle-use injector nozzle for straw filling machine, in particular for artificial insemination of animals and storage of biological products
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/412, 604/34, 137/561.00R, 251/7
International ClassificationA61M1/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61M1/02
European ClassificationA61M1/02