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Publication numberUS2915095 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 1, 1959
Filing dateMar 25, 1958
Priority dateMar 25, 1958
Publication numberUS 2915095 A, US 2915095A, US-A-2915095, US2915095 A, US2915095A
InventorsPelto Edward A
Original AssigneePelto Edward A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Power operated end thrust type rotary shaper planer
US 2915095 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

'Dec. 1, 1959 E. A. PELTO 2,915,095

POWER OPERATED END THRUST TYPE ROTARY SHAPER PLANER Filed March 25, 1958 2 Sheets-Sheet l l N VEN TOR.

[ QM 4,91 4 P5170 ATTI'J RNEYS Dec. 1, 1959 E. 'A. PELTO 2,915,095

POWER OPERATED END THRUST TYPE ROTARY SHAPER PLANER Filed March 25, 1958 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 ATTCI RN EYS United States Patent POWER OPERATED END THRUST TYPE ROTARY SHAPER PLANER Edward A. Pelto, Saginaw, Mich. Application March 25, 1958, Serial No. 723,738 1 Claim. (Cl. 144-134) This invention relates to a cutting tool, and more particularly to a rotary type of cutting tool.

The object of the invention is to provide a rotary cutting tool which can be driven by or operated by a conlvflegntional mechanism such as a drill press, lathe or the Another object of the invention is to provide a rotary shaper or planer which includes a novel means for mounting and fastening cutter bars in a base, so that the user can make highly accurate cuttings in a highly eflicient manner with a minimum amount of time and effort involved.

A further object of the invention is to provide a rotary shaper-planer which is extremely simple and inexpensive to manufacture.

Other objects and advantages will be apparent during the course of the following description.

In the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this application, and in which like numerals are used to designate like parts throughout the same- Figure 1 is a perspective view illustrating the rotary shaper-planer of the present invention being used with a drill press.

Figure 2 is a bottom plan view of the rotary shaperplaner, and taken on the line 2-2 of Figure 3.

Figure 3 is a side elevational view of the rotary shaperplaner of the present invention.

Figure 4 is a view taken on the line 4-4 of Figure 2.

Figure 5 is a sectional view taken on the line 5-5 of Figure 3.

Figure 5a is a fragmentary exploded view, showing certain parts of the device.

Figure 6 is a side elevational view of a modification and showing arcuate cutters.

Figure 7 is a view taken on the line 7-7 of Figure 8.

Figure 8 is a view taken on the line 8-8 of Figure 6.

Figure 9 is a fragmentary sectional view showing the parts in exploded position.

Figure 10 is a sectional view taken on the line 10-10 of Figure 6.

Figure 11 is a fragmentary side elevational view illustrating a still further modification wherein circular cutters are used.

Figure 12 is a bottom plan view of the assembly shown in Figure 11.

Figure 13 is a sectional view taken on the line 13-13 of Figure 12.

Figure 14 is a fragmentary sectional view illustrating the parts that make up the device of Figures 11, 12 and 13.

Figure 15 illustrates the tool being used as a planer in use with the finger guard. 1

Figure 16 is a sectional view showing the tool making a different type of cut.

Figure 17 is a view illustrating a further use of the tool.

Referring in detail to the drawings, and more particularly to Figures 1 through 511 of the drawings, the numeral 10 indicates a portion of a conventional drill press which The numeral 15 indicates a workpiece such as a piece of wood being cut. The present invention is directed to a rotary shaper-planer which is indicated generally by the numeral 17, and the shaper-planer can be operated by a suitable tool such as the drill press 10.

The rotary shaper-planer 17 of the present invention includes a shaft 18 which is adapted to be connected to a chuck such as the chuck 11. The tool 17 further includes a circular base 19 which has its lower portion cut away peripherally as at 20.

The base 19 is provided with a pair of spaced parallel grooves 21 which have their inner end portions terminating in circular openings 22, Figure 2. The numeral 23 indicates cutter bars which are seated in the grooves 21, and the cutter bars 23 are provided with beveled or inclined surfaces 24 that are adapted to engage and coact with similar inclined or beveled surfaces 25 in the base 19.

As shown in the drawings such as Figure 5a, there is provided in the base 19 threaded bores or openings 26, and it will be seen that these bores 26 are arranged at an angle with respect to the center of the base so that these bores 26 are somewhat offset with respect to the base. There is further provided in the base 19, a pair of circular recesses 27 which communicate with the bores 26 and also with the grooves 21. Seated in each recess 27 is a bushing 28, and each bushing 28 includes a wall portion 29 which is provided with a central aperture 30. Each bushing 28 further includes a wall section 31 which is provided with a beveled edge 32 for coaction with or engagement with a side 33 of the cutter bar 23.

As shown in the drawings, there is further provided screw members or lock screws which are indicated generally by the numeral 34, and each screw member 34 includes a threaded shank 35 which extends-through the aperture 30 in the bushing 28, and the shank 35 threadedly engages a bore 26 in the base 19. Each screw member 34 further includes an enlarged head 36 which is provided with an inner socket 37 whereby a suitable tool such as a Wrench can -be arranged in engagement with the socket 37 when the screw member is being removed or replaced.

Referring now to Figures 6 through 10 of the drawings, the numeral 38 indicates a modified type of rotary shaperplaner which includes a shaft 39'and a base 40, and the base 40 has its lower portion cut away on its outer periphery as at 41. The base 40 is provided with a pair of curved grooves 42, and curved cutter bars 43 are seated in the grooves 42. The base 40 is also provided with arcuate cutouts 44, Figure 8. As shown in the drawings, the base 40 is further provided with circular recesses 45 which communicate with the grooves 42, andoffset 'or angularly arranged threaded bores 46 communicate with the recesses 45.

A bushing 47 is adapted to be seated in each recess 45, and the bushings 47 each include a .wall portion 48 having an aperture 49 therein. Each bushing 47 further includes a wall section 50 which has a beveled surface 51 for engagement with and coaction with a beveled surface 52 on the cutter bar 43.

Screw members 53 have threaded shanks 54 which extend through the apertures 49 and into engagement with the bores 46. Each screw member 53 further includes an enlarged head 55 having a socket 56 therein.

Referring now to Figures 11 through 14 of the drawings, there is illustrated a further modified rotary shaperplaner which is indicated generally by the numeral 61, and the shaper-planer 61 includes a shaft 62 and a base 63 which has its lower portion cut away as at 64. The numeral 58 indicates substantially circular cutter bars which are adapted to be seated in arcuate grooves 57 3 that are formed in the base 63. The cutter bars 58 are provided with beveled outer surfaces 59 for coaction with corresponding beveled surfaces 60 in the base 63.

There is further provided in the base 63 angularly arranged threaded'bores 65; As shown in Figurell for example, the inner portions of the cutter bars 58 are cut away as at so as to define shoulders. The base 63 is further provided with recesses 67 which communicate with the grooves 57 and which also communicate with the bores 65, Figure 14. The numeral 68 indicates a bushingwhich is adapted to seat in the recess 67, and the bushing 68 includes a wall portion 69 having an aperture 70 therein. The bushing 68 further includes a wall section 71 which has a flange 72 for engagement with the shoulder 66 of the cutter bar 58. A screw member 73 includes a threaded shank 74 which extends through the aperture 70 and into threaded'engagement with the bore-65, and the screw member 73 further includes an enlarged head 75 having a socket 76.

The base 63 is further provided with openings 77 which'are adapted to register with spaces or openings 78 in' the bushings 68, and locator pins 79 are adapted to extend between the openings 77 and 78 for properly centering or aligning the parts.

Fromthe foregoing, it will be seen that there has been provided a tool which includes a rotary member that carries a pair of cutter bars, so that when the tool is attached to a conventional driving mechanism or motor, the tool can be used for performing various types of cut ting or shaping or planing operations. Thus, as shown in Figures 1 through 5a for example, it will be seen that the tool 17 is constructed so that the shaft 18 of the tool can be attached to a chuck 11 of a drill press 10. Also, a pair of cutter bars 23 are seated in the grooves 21, and due to the previously described construction, these cutter bars 23 will be securely locked in the grooves so that accidental displacement of the cutter bars is prevented. Thus, this locking effect is brought about due to the interengagement of the surfaces 24 and 25, and also there is provided on the bushings 28 an inclined surface 32 which engages a surface 33 of the cutter bar 23. The bores 26 are offset with respect to the vertical so that when the screw members 34 are arranged as shown in the drawings, the surface 32 of the bushing 28 will wedge against the surface 33 of the cutter bar 23, so that the cutter bar 23 will be securely locked or clamped in the groove 21. The socket 37 and the screw member 34 can be engaged by a suitable member such as awrench when the screw member and its associated parts are to be removed or replaced, or when the cutter bar is to be adjusted. The base 19 is provided with arcuate cutouts 80. As shown in the drawings, the cutter bars 23 are shaped on their ends so as to define sharp cutting edges 81 and 82 for engagement with material being worked on.

With an arrangement as shown in Figure l for example, it will'be seen that a great number of workpieces can be accurately and quickly cut and a conventional drive mechanism such as a drill press can be used for operating the tool. The parts can be made of any suitable material and in difierent shapes or sizes. Different arrangements of set screws can be used for holding the cutters in place.

.Thetool of the present invention can be used in a drill press with a table or in a wood mill or a routing machine; With the tool, a board which has one face straight and flat may be cut to a uniform thickness and the faces made parallel to a very close tolerance. The board can be held firmly with both hands and with a sliding action along the top of the machine table, the

board can be passed along under the planer against the direction of rotation. The newly planed surface will be left free of chatter bumps or ripples: which commonly occur on certain types of roller feed planers.

The rotary planer is especially suitable for useby wood patternmakers, body die model makers and hobby shop personnel who desire a very close degree of accuracy in their work and among patternmakers this tool is called a router. At times, a finger guard 85 may be used, and the finger guard 85 is removed when the planer is to be operated as a shaper.

In the various tools illustrated in the drawings, the base or body can be made integral with the shaft or else these parts can be secured together with a press fit and the end of the shaft can be welded or flared onto the base. As shown in Figure 2, a pin 86 may be driven in at the joint to act as a key to make the parts more secure.

The outside diameter of the base such as the base 19 is undercut as at 20 to provide clearance for the outside cutting lip of the cutters 23. This undercut is just sufficient for clearance but is not large enough so that the rotary shaper-planer will grab or hog into the material being cut which is a' safety feature. There is further provided the deeper'radial undercuts which take care of chips and shavings; It is to be noted that in Figure 4 for example, the lower cutter lip or edge 82 extends below the base 19 just enough for clearance. The planer will not dig or grab into the stock or material being'cut any deeper than this clearance because'the lower surface of the base 19 will come in contact with the work and prevent the cutters from digging in too deep which is. also a safety feature.

The rotary shaper-planer may also be operated with or without the removable finger guard 85 which has a running fit'about' the base of the shaft. The finger guard may be made of any suitable material such as celluloid, plastic, metal or the like. The finger guard projects beyond or overhangsthe base a reasonable distance in order to properly operate.

The cutters 23 are each of the same construction and each is made of "a straight piece of steel with one side at an angle lengthwise as indicated by the numeral 24, and the grooves 21 are cut into the base to conform with the shape ofthe' cutters 23. Thus, the grooves 21 are provided with beveled surfaces 25 for receiving or engaging the surfaces 24. The holes or openings 22 at the ends of the grooves are provided for clearance to help in machining.

The cup-shaped retainer or bushing 28 goes into place on a compound angle, and it has one side flattened off on an angle as at 32 to engage the side 33 of the cutter when drawn down securely by the screw member 34;

In Figures 6 through 10 the cutter bars 43 consists of a .true curved piece of steel with one side at an angle, and the'grooves 42 are cut into the base 40 to conform with the curved cutter 43. The tool shown in Figures 6 through 10 is especially suitable because of its simplicity and ease of machining, and it will be noted that four can be mounted on a face plate and machined at the same time. Thus, one face plate with angled mounting pads will take care of the slots or grooves, and another face plate will take care of the chip clearance cutaway 44. The cup shaped retainer or bushing 47 goes into place on a compound angle, and has one side flattened off as at 51 to engage the cutter 43. The cutter 43 is held secure when the retainer 47 is drawn down tight by the socket screw member 53.

In Figures 11 through 14, the circular grooves 57 with tapered walls and each on a compound angle are made in the base 63 to receive the circular cutters 58. The cutters are tapered to conform with the grooves. Suitable indentation' marks or notches may be placed on the outer circumference of the base so that when cutters such as the cutters 58 are being sharpened, the proper surfaces may be ground or honed. Also, such marks or notches can be used to facilitate replacement of the cutter and its associated parts whereby the tool can be easily sharpened and adjusted. The cutting face of the cutters 58 can be set ofi a proper distance with relation to the center line running through the cutters and the base as desired in order to make suflicient periphery clearance. The flange 72 engages the shoulder 66 and the screws 73 hold the parts in place. The pins 79 can be used for properly locating the bushing 71.

The tool of the present invention is adapted to revolve at a high r.p.m. and centrifugal force has been taken into consideration by having suflicient supporting metal on the outwardly side of the cutter bits. The tool may have one or more cutters, although in the drawings two cutters have been illustrated.

Referring to Figure 15 of the drawings, the tool is shown serving its primary purpose, which is of planing a board such as the board 90 parallel to a desired dimension in thickness, and the board 90 is shown resting on a work table 91.

In Figure 16 the tool 17 is shown making a cut in a workpiece 92 which is resting on a work table 93, and a template 94 is fastened to the workpiece 92 in any suitable manner, as for example by means of securing elements 95.

In Figure 17, the tool is shown making a cut in a workpiece 96 which may rest on a Work table 97, and the numeral 98 indicates a guide member which may be fastened to the work bench 97 in any suitable manner, as for example by means of securing elements 99.

In Figure 17 a tenon is being cut, and in Figure 16 the tool is shown making a cut adjacent to an edge of a template such as the template 94 and the cut may be made curved along one edge of the template and straightaway along the other edge of the template to the desired depth.

The finger guard is adapted to be used in all forms of the invention with the exception of that shown in Figure 1.

In Figure 15 the tool, which is primarily a planer, is shown in use with the finger guard 85 and it is only necessary to slide the board under the tool against the direction of rotation so as to take a cut about one-half the tools diameter wide at a time.

In Figure 17 a tenon is cut, and the tool 17 bears against the side of a guide strip so that a series of cuts can be made to bring it to the desired depth. Or, the guide strip may be left off and the straight board 98 can be fastened to the table 97 to act as a guide strip for the tenon stock, and after the proper number of cuts are taken, the operator can reverse the tenon stock and cut the other side.

In Figure 16, the tool can bear against the side of the template and cut the contour on the one side and the straight cut on the other side and after a sufiicient number of cuts are made, the tool will be brought to the desired depth in the material 92.

Minor changes in shape, size and rearrangement of details coming within the field of invention claimed may be resorted to in actual practice, if desired.

I claim:

In a tool, a shaft, a base secured to the lower end of said shaft, the lower outer portion of said base being cutaway, there being a pair of curved grooves in said base, a curved cutter bar positioned in each groove and said bars having cutting edges thereon, there being a pair of arcuate cutouts in said base communicating with said groove, there being circular recesses in said base communicating with said grooves, said base being provided with angularly arranged threaded bores which communicate with said recesses, a bushing seated in each recess and said bushing including a wall portion provided with an aperture therein, each bushing further including a wall section provided with an aperture therein, each bushing further including a wall section provided with a beveled edge for engagement with a side of the cutter bar, a screw member having a threaded shank extending through the aperture in said bushing and engaging a threaded bore, said screw member further including an enlarged head seated in said bushing and provided with a socket.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 828,706 Bohling et al Aug. 14, 1906 955,482 Stewart Apr. 19, 1910 1,183,015 Lane et al. May 16, 1916 2,214,449 Berry Sept. 10, 1940 2,657,723 Johnson Nov. 3, 1953 2,785,713 Wagner Mar. 19, 1957 2,805,695 Hoheisel Sept. 10, 1957

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US828706 *Jan 16, 1906Aug 14, 1906Frederick BohlingShaper-guard.
US955482 *Mar 31, 1909Apr 19, 1910Walter G StewartShaper-guard.
US1183015 *Jul 2, 1915May 16, 1916Berlin Machine WorksCutter-head.
US2214449 *Jan 6, 1939Sep 10, 1940Henry J BerryCutting head
US2657723 *Oct 20, 1950Nov 3, 1953Johnson Charles AKnife blade mounting for chippers
US2785713 *Mar 16, 1954Mar 19, 1957G & W Tool CompanyPower operated rotary end-thrust cutter
US2805695 *Feb 13, 1956Sep 10, 1957Hoheisel LouisPower operated, end thrust finishing cutter
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4133361 *Feb 2, 1976Jan 9, 1979Woodwork Corporation Of AmericaMethod for machining joints for miters, grooves and other joinery in a beveled or straight panel edge and apparatus for same
US4971124 *Sep 29, 1989Nov 20, 1990Wolle Christopher SSliver patching method and apparatus
US6148880 *Jun 18, 1998Nov 21, 2000Robert Bosch GmbhFlat-surface milling machine
US6196286 *Dec 28, 1999Mar 6, 2001Thermwood CorporationMethod and tool for manufacturing a shaped edge, veneer surfaced, furniture top
US6354347 *Jan 8, 2001Mar 12, 2002Freud Tmm, Inc.Router bit for forming raised door panels
US8082717Mar 6, 2006Dec 27, 2011Dirk DammersPanel, in particular floor panel
US8464768 *Jun 3, 2006Jun 18, 2013Dirk DammersMethod of forming locking groove in groove flank
EP0247196A1 *Dec 1, 1986Dec 2, 1987HAHN, RichardCombination planing and finishing tool
Classifications
U.S. Classification144/135.2, 144/134.1, 144/251.1, 144/219
International ClassificationB27G13/00, B27G13/14, B27C1/00, B27G21/00
Cooperative ClassificationB27G13/14, B27G21/00, B27C1/005
European ClassificationB27C1/00C, B27G13/14, B27G21/00