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Publication numberUS2915150 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 1, 1959
Filing dateAug 19, 1955
Priority dateAug 19, 1955
Publication numberUS 2915150 A, US 2915150A, US-A-2915150, US2915150 A, US2915150A
InventorsWeidler Ralph W
Original AssigneeWeidler Ralph W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Basement assembly and prefabricated structural units therefor
US 2915150 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

BASEMENT ASSEMBLY A A CA Aug. 19, 1955 FOR Dec- 1, 1959 R. w. wElDLER 2,915,150

BASEMENT ASSEMBLY AND PREEABRICATED STRUCTURAL UNTTs THEREEoR Filed Aug. 19. 1955 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.V

RALPH W WEIDLER N BY i c- W M m 'A ATTORNEY Dec. 1, 1959 R. w. wElDLER 2,915,150

BASEMENT ASSEMBLY AND PREFABRICATED STRUCTURAL UNITS THEREFOR Filed Aug. 19, 1955 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 fig' y' INVENTOR. RALPH w wEmLER 24 1 yk@ m l ATTORNEY Dec. 1, 1959 R. w. wEIDLER 2,915,150

BASEMENT ASSEMBLY AND PREFABRICATED STRUCTURAL UNITS THEREFOR Filed Aug. 19, 1955 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 I I I l I l I I l I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I l I I I I I I I I I I I I I I INVENTOR.

RALPH \n/. WEIDLER ATTORNEY D- l 1959 R. w.w1:|D| ER 2,915,150

BAsEnmNT ASSEMBLY AND PREFABRICATED STRUCTURAL UNITS THEREFOR Filed Aug. 19. 1955 5 sheets-sheet 5 m ,1 w A H w W m w my B M 6W M M if l J l M m ,/Tfffllll{fili} ....uunuhuavw... o. o UIIIIH! l i3 United States Patent-O BASEMENT ASSEMBLY AND PREFABRICATED STRUCTURAL UNITS THEREFOR l Ralph W. Weidler, Yardley, Pa. Application August 19,1955, serial No. `529,396

' s Claims. (C1. 18s- 34) This invention relates to a novel basement construction7 and `more particularly to a basement assembly employing prefabricated structural sections or units.

The building industry, having been motivated by the tion for a building, and adapted to be assembled in position to extend either partially or entirely below ground. It is an object of the invention to provide a basement construction employing prefabricated structures capable of being assembled quickly and easily at the building site; to provide a completed basement assembly Which elimi nates, to a great extent, the expensive, time consuming concrete basements heretofore custo-mary; to reduce the use of expensive concrete molds', skilled workmen to prepare the molds, and the drying period that is normally required to harden the concrete. As a consequence, a feature of the invention resides in the ability to construct the basement, substautiallyunhampered by Weather conditions, by employing the novel prefabricated structures of the invention. l

-Another object of the invention is to provide a basement construction of prefabricated sections or units which join and cooperate to afford unbroken horizontal, vertical and lateral support for the building thereabove. f

Still another object of the-invention is to provide a novel assembled basement, constructed of prefabricated structures, which is termite-proof, fire-proof, resistant to lateral shock blasts and capable of providing a founda tion, for the building thereabove, which is'substantially unaffected by minor vertical shifting or erosion of the soil therebelow. A

A further object of the invention is to provide prefabricated means for erecting low cost basements with unskilled labor.

Other and further iobjects of :my invention reside in the formingfpart of the basement assembly, with portions thereof cut away to show details of the prefabricated units or sections therebeneath.

Fig. 4 is a front elevation of a prefabricated basic intermediate section forming a part of the basement assembly` and constructed in accordance with the teaching of the invention.

Fig. 5 is a top view of the prefabricated basic intermediate section shown in Fig. 4.

Fig. 6 is a front elevation of a prefabricated corner section" or unit forming a part of the basement assembly and constructed in accordance with the teaching of the invention.

Fig. 7 is a top view of the prefabricated corner sectionv or unit shown in Fig. 6.1

Fig. v8 is a side elevational view of the Prefabricated corner section or unit shown in Fig. 6.

Fig. 9 is a sectional view of the prefabricated corner section or unit shown in Fig. 6 taken substantially along lines' 9 9.

Fig. 10 is a front elevation of a prefabricated door secl tion or unit capable of forming a part of the basement assembly and constructed in accordance with the teaching of the'invention. t

Fig. 11 is a top-view of the prefabricated door section or unit shown in Fig. 10.

Fig; 1 2 is a sectional view of the Prefabricated door section orunit shown in Fig. 10 and as taken along lines 12-12.

Fig. 13 isa front elevation of a prefabricated windowy sectionor unitcapable of forming a part of the basement assembly and constructed according to the teaching of the invent-ion.

Fig, 14 is ya -topv view -o-f the Prefabricated window section or unit shown in Fig. 13, and

Fig. l5 is a sectional side view of the prefabricated window section shown in Fig. 13 and as taken along lines 1 5-15.

Referring now to the drawings, vthebasement generally identifedby the numeral 20 in- Fig. 1, embodies a construction pursuant to the invention, the same being conv structed or assembled of Afactory prefabricated structural units which may be put together in the field by relatively unskilled laborin a minimum of time. The particular architectural plan selected for illustration is quite simple, and; of course, subject to variation within the practical l limits of the prefabricated sections or units employedifor effecting thepurposes of the invention.

In general, `the construction ofthe basement assembly indicated by the numeral 20 in Fig. 1, comprises a foundation support 22 on which are mounted a plurality of Prefabricated sections or units. Defining the corners of the basement construction 20 are prefabricated corner sections or units generally identified by the numeral 24. The prefabricated corner units 24 cooperate with adjoining prefabricated intermediate sections or units to form i the walls: of .the basement construction.

structure and arrangement hereinafter more fully def scribed with reference to the accompanying drawings in which: f i

Fig. 1 is a side perspective View of the novel prefabril cated basement assembly constructed in accordance with the teaching of the invention with portions thereofbeing y broken away.

. Fig..2 is :a side perspective view of a lower portion of the basement assembly shown in Fig. 1, including the footing member.

Fig. 3 is a top perspective view of thel cap channel Certain ofthe intermediate sections or units provide a'v Such sections are termed, for the benefit of description, basic intermediate sections wall of uninterrupted detail.

or units andare identified by the numeral 26. At times, it may be vdesired that doors and windows be included in the details of the basement construction 20.A In that event,.one of the Prefabricated intermediate sections 26* v mayinclude a door, and as such, itwill be identified asi a Prefabricated door section or unit v28,- whilef'any one of` ther intermediate sections which includesa window, will be' identified as a prefabricated window unit'or section 30.

The construction thus far described :in general terms,

provides a foundation and support for the building structure to be constructed thereabove.

As the description proceeds, the structures `set forth in a general manner above, Will be described in detail in order-that their cooperating functions may be more clearly enumerated and their noveldetails of construction noted.

The support means 22 (see Figs. 1 and 2), comprises a concrete footing 34 which may be formed by pouring concreteV into a footing mold, or if it is desired to obviate the use of a special mold, by providing a footing trench excavated from the ground, and into which the concrete may be poured, the excavated trench thus serving as a footing mold.

As can thus be seen from lFigs.v 1 and 2, the footing 34 is materially shallower in height and relatively narrower in width than the poured concrete basement footings commonly in use. Formed in the footing 34, is a continuous channel-shaped groove 36, which serves as a mounting` or guide for channel-shaped seat members38 adapted to fit therein.

Each of the channel-shaped seat members 38 may be either a single continuous member, or formed as the result of ai number of channel-shaped members Welded together either at the factory or at the building site. In either event, each member 38 extends for the full length of each of the respective channel-shaped grooves 36 within which' it is mounted. Although it will'be made clearer as the description proceeds, the purpose of the seat members 38 is to provide a seat or guide for a plurality of the aforementioned prefabricated sections which are asL sembled therein and which, when combined, makeup the walls of the basement 20."y

The support or foundation 22 also includes a ilud-V tight, water resistant mastic sealer 40 which is positioned in the seatA member 3S before the prefabricated sections' 24 tol 30Vare seated`tlier'ein. Thewidth of the sealing means 4) is the same as that of the'base of the seat 38,` and extends'for the full'length thereof. The combination of structures thus far described provides an adequate footing and secure support and seat for the later assembled prefabricated sections 24 to 30.

This type of foundation and support is substantially un-Y affected by minor vertical soil erosion or sinkingj since the combined seats of the footing 36 and the continuous seat member 38 provide sufficient vertical strength and support to overcome the minor shearing forces which normally affect a concrete basement foundation.

When the 'sub-soil is unyielding it may be desired to eliminate the use of the separate seat member 38. If so, the prefabricated sections or units 24 to 30, later to be described in detail, may seat directly within' the groove 36 of the footing 34,v after the mastic or fluid-resistant sealer 40, has been properly positioned therein. Thus the channel-shaped footing groove 36 `may also serve directly as a seat and guide for the'later assembled prefabricated sections or units 24 to 30.

Once the support 22 has been laid and properly completed with the mastic sealer 40 positioned therein, the tirst prefabricated section or unit to beA seated thereon' is the corner section or unit 24. Details of the prefabricated corner sectionI 24 are shown in Figs. 6 to 9 inclusive, and reference is now made thereto.

rlfhe Prefabricated Acorner section 24 comprises an Vouter surface which includes an outer plate'42 bent intermediate it's ends to form two side walls (not numbered) of a corner. parallelismwith two inner plates- 44.and 46 which cooperate to form an inner surface of the corner "sec` tion 24. The rst inner plate 44 is secured :parallel rela# tive to one of the side walls of the outer surface plate *421 by vertically extending channel-shaped stiifeners 48 which'may'be welded at one of their legs 49 to the back# side of the outer surface 42, and at the-other of their' The two sides of the outer plate 42 are irL legs 50, to a corresponding inner face of the inner surface plate 44.

The other inner plate 46 cooperating with the inner plate 44 to make up the inner surface of the prefabricated corner section 24, is similarly secured in parallel relationship relative to the other side wall of the outer surface plate 42, by further stiifeners 48 having legs 49 and 50. The inner plate 46 has a bent marginal end 52 which is secured to the inner plate 44 at their point of jointure, thus to complete the inner surface of the corner section '24.

As best seen in Figs. 6 and 8, the stiifeners 48 extend vertically for the full height of the surface plates 42, 44 and 46, and are relatively spaced horizontally each from the other to provide adequate periodic support between the surfaces. included in the periodically spaced stiifener construction between the outer andinner surfaces, are end stil'feners 54 and 56 each facing in the same direction.

The end stiifener 54 serves as a female joining member, while the opposite end stifener 56 serves as a male joining member in a manner which will be presently described. The female joining member 54 is exactly'the same as the remaining stiffeners 48 of which it forms a part. It is connected at its one leg 50 to the inner surface plate 46, and at its other leg 49, to the outer surface plate 42, thusfproviding support at its respective end of the prefabricated corner section '24.

It will be noted from Fig. 7 that the edges of the legs 49 and 50 of the female stilfener 54, are in alignment with the corresponding edges of the inner and outer plates 42 and 46, while its interconnecting bcdy portion t (not numbered) extends inwardly from the aligned edges of the plates 42,- 46.

AThe male stiffener'or joining member 56, varies slightly in structure from therernaining stiifeners 48 and the female joining s tiffener 54; The widthV of the intercom necting `body Yportion (not numbered) of the male joining member 56 is slightly less than the width between the legs 49 and 59 of the female joining member S4 at the opposite end of the prefabricated section 24. As a consequence, its legs 58 and 6i) are slightly longer in length than the previously described legs 49 and 5t).

As seen in Fig. 7, the interconnecting body portion of the male joining member or stiifener 56, extends outwardly beyond its respective end of the prefabricated section 24, a distance substantially equal to the depth thatl the interconnecting body portion of the opposite joining member 54 extends from the aligned edge of its legs 49 and 50, for a purpose which will become obvious as the description continues. Inasmuch as the interconnecting body portion of the male joining member S6 is narrower in width than the remaining stiffeners of the prefabricated corner section 24, 'the space between its respective legs 58'and 6i) and the adjacent plates 44 and l42 are taken up by shims 62.

The'shims 62 are secured to the inside faces of the plates 42 and 44. In turn, the legs 58 and 60 of the male joining members 56 are secured to the shims with the interconnecting body portion of the male joining member 56 extending outwardly beyond the edges of the outer and inner surface forming plates 42 and '44, as previously described.

Secured to the outer face of the outer surface plate 42, are corrugated sheet members 64, each of which extendsfrom the end of its respective side wall of theI the apex of the bend. The corrugated sheet members 64, having a flat portion 65, extend vertically along each sidewall 42 beginning at the bottom and extending to a height which will be equal to or slightly higher than the back-filled ground later moved back into position alongside the `basement construction 20.

In order to cover the slight space between the facing ends k.of the corrugated sheet members 64,- there is provided A urved ,corru`gated bridging.l memberA The corrugated'bridging member 66 is formed with a-radius equal tothe radius of the-bendiof the outer surfaceplate 42` to evenly bridge both corrugated' sheet members 64 secured thereto.

It will be noted from Figs. 6, 7 and 8 that the lowerend of the bridging corrugated member 66 falls short of, and does not extend completely to the bottom of jthe prefabricated corner section 2'4 as do the members 64. Thus, when the section 24 is set into the corner of the supporting foundation 22 on top of the mastic sealing strip 40, theA corrugated side members 64 will seat within the channel-shaped seat member 38, while the lower end of the bridging, corrugated member 66 will/sit on top of the channel member 38 and bridge a corner portion of the concrete supporting footing 34. i

It is contemplated however, that the side wall corrugated members 64 may, at timesalso fall short of the bottom of the corner `section 24 a distance equal to the height of the legs of the seat member 38' by eliminating the flat 65. In that case, the section will seat within the member 38 with the corrugated side members 64 and the bridging member 66 beginning at the height of the leg of the seat member. The corrugations of the corrugated members extend widthwise or horizontally of the section 24 to provide support in a lateral direction and in opposition to the force of the ground later backiilled thereagainst. The vertical stiifeners 48, and the stiffeners 54 and 56 provide additionallateral support between the inner and outer surface plates, and vertical and horizontal support for the walls of the basement construction 20.

The basic intermediate section or unit generally identied by the numeral 26 comprises parallel inner andouter surface plates 68 and 70 respectively. The inner and outer surface plates 68 and 7 0 are retained in their parallel relationship and supported by stiifeners 48, 54 and 56. The stiffeners y48, spaced horizontally from each other, are positioned intermediate the ends of the plates 68 and 70. They are secured to the plate 70 at their legs 49 and to the inner plate 68 at their legs 50.

Included in the stiifener construction are the female and male stiffener joining members, 54 and 56 respectively, and each of which faces in the same direction. As the description of the basic intermediate section 26 proceeds, it will be recognized that the female and male joining members -are of the same construction as the corresponding female and male joining members disclosed in the prefabricated corner section 24.

That is, the female joining member 54,l being of the same construction as the intermediate stiieners 48, is secured in alignment with the ends of the inner and outer plates 68 and 70 respectively. The joining member 54 is secured to the inner face of the outer surface plate 70 -at the leg 49, and to the corresponding inner face of the inner 'surface plate 68 at its leg 50. The body portion of the joining member 54 extends inwardly from its respective ends of the plates 68 and 70 to form a female joining member.

At the opposite end of the section 26 the male joining member 56, also of the same construction as the male joining member of the prefabricated corner section 24, has an interconnecting body portion (not numbered), narrower than the female joining member 54, as a consequence, its legs 58 and 60 are longer in length than the legs 49 and 50 of the remaining stiffeners '48 and 54. thus, in order to secure the joining member 56,to the insides of the plates 68 and 70, shims-62 are positioned between the plates and the legs 58 and 60.

The shims 62 are thus secured to the inner and outer surface plates 68 and 70, and in turn, the legs 58 and 60 of the male joining member 56 are secured thereto.

As was the case in the prefabricated corner section 24, the male joining member 56 in the prefabricated basic intermediate section 26, has its interconnecting body portion extending outwardly beyondits respective ends 6 oftheinner and Vouter surface plates l68 and 70,A a distance equal to the depth-which ,the interconnecting body portionrof the female joiningA member 54 e xtendsvinwardly from its respective endof the prefabricated section 26. Secured to thepouter face of ltheouter surface plate 70 is a corrugated member 64. Member y64, like the previously describedv corrugated members secured to the prefabricated'corner section 24,- has a at portion 65 (Fig. 2) to extend into seat 38gwhile thefremainder of member 64 covers a portion of the outerV surface plate 70. Its corrugations, it will be noted, extend` horizontally, or widthwise of the prefabricated basic intermediate section 26` to provide forces acting ylaterally of the section in opposition to the lateral-forces exerted by the ground later backlled against the section and against the whole basement construction 20. l As previously described, here again, the corrugations 64 need not extend to the `full or lowest depth of the outer surface plate 70, but rather may start at a height from the bottom of this plate equal to the height of the legs of the channel-shaped seat 38 by eliminating the at 65. On the other hand, it is within the contemplation of the invention that the corrugated member 64 may have a lower flat surface 65, such as is better seen in Fig. 2, which is adapted to seat within the upstanding legs of the channelshaped seat member 38 and on top ofthe mastic sealing strip 40.

The prefabricated intermediate section, including a door and door opening generally identified by the numeral 28y and better known as a prefabricated door section or unit,

' is shown in detail in Figs. 10,` 171` and l2. The prefabricated door section 28 comprisesinner and outer surface plates 72 andl 74 respectively. The inner and outer surface plates 72 and 74 are spaced in parallel relationship and supportedin this relationship by astiffener construc-v tion including a plurality of vertically spaced stifeners 48 and 48a. l i

The stilfeners 48 and 48a are of the same channelshaped construction as employedin bothfof the previously described prefabricated corner and basicV intermediate sectionsk 24 and 26 respectively. Certain of the stiffeners 48 extendvertically for the full length ofthe spaced parallel inner and outer surface plates 72 and 74, while certain others of them, 48a, extend for only a short vertical distance between the two surface plates for a reason to be described. l

A door frame 76, having inner and outer spaced marginal edges 78 and 79 respectively, is secured in the prefabricated door section 28 With the marginal edges disposed on the outer faces of the inner and outer surface plates 72 and 74, in a manner which can bestl be seen in Fig. l2. The frame 76 may be secured to the plates 72 and 74 along its marginal edges 78 and 79 by welding or in any other well known manner.

At the bottom ofthe door frame 76 there is a step 80 which slopes in a direction from the inner surface plate-72 forwardly and downwardly toward the outer surface plate '74. The step 80 may be formed as an integral part of the door frame 76, or if desired, may be assembled to cooperate therewith in the position as shown in the drawings after the door frame has been assembled with its marginal edges 78 and 7 9 overlapping adjacent portions of the plates 72 and 74.

Three short stiffeners, numbered 48a, forming'a part of the previously mentioned stiffener construction, are positioned between the inner and outer surface plates 72 and 74, and along the top portion of the door frame 76. They provide periodic strengthening and support between the two surface plates 72 and 74 along the top of the frame 76. The three short stiifeners 48ay are secured to the plates 72 and 74 at their legs 49 and 50.

The stiffeners 48 are positioned between the plates 72 and 74 within the outline of the marginal edges 78 of the door frame 76. They also are secured to the two surface plates at their legs 49 and 50. The stiifener's 5,4 and 56,

7 facing in the same direction and at opposite ends of the section 28, constitute female and male joining means respectively for the prefabricated door section.

The female joining member 54 at the one end of the prefabricated section 28 is of the same channel-shaped construction as the stiffeners 48 and 48a. Its legs 49 and 50 are secured to the outer and inner plates 74 and 72 respectively and'in alignment with their edges, to provide stiifening support thereat. The interconnecting body portion (not numbered) of the female joining member 54 is spaced inwardly from its respective end of the section.

At the other end of the section 28, the male joining member 56, being of the same construction as the male joining members described in the construction of the prefabricated sections 24 and 26, has an interconnecting body portion (not numbered) which is narrower in width than the remaining stiffeners 48, 48a and 54. The width of the body portion of the male joining member 56 is slightly less than the space between the legs 49 and 50 of the previously mentioned female joining members 54. As a consequence, its legs 58 and 60 are longer in length than the corresponding legs 49 and 50 of the remaining stitfeners.

Because the bodyportion of the male joining member 56 is narrower in width than the space between the two surface plates 72 and 74, shims 62 are secured therebetween. The male joining member 56, it will be noted, (Fig. l1), extends outwardly beyond its respective end of the section 28 a distance substantially equal to the length of the legs 49 and S0 of the female joining member 54 at the opposite end of the section.

Hinges 82 are shown ksecured to the door frame 76 (see Fig. 12). The hinges are adapted to be fixed to a swingable door (see Fig. l), which may then be opened and closed in the frame 76. The sloping step 80, forming part of the frame 76 of the prefabricated door section 28, deects and directs any uid which may strike or lie thereupon, away from the inside surface plate 72` and away from the inside of the basement construction 20.

The prefabricated window section or unit 3l), better seen in Figs. 13, 14 and 15, comprises an outer surface plate 84 and an inner surface plate 86. The outer and inner surface plates 84 and 86 are spaced from each other and secured in parallel relationship by a stiffener construction comprising a plurality of vertically disposed stiifeners 48, 54 and 56.

The stifeners 4S extend vertically between the outer and inner surface plates for only a portion thereof, While the end stilfeners 54 and 56, each facing in the same direction, extend for the full vertical length of the section. Both the outer and inner surface plates have aligned openings 88 in which a window frame, generally identified by the numeral 90 is accommodated.

Window frame 90 has spaced outer and inner marginal edges 92 and 94. The spaced marginal edges of the frame 90 overlap the defining walls of the aligned openings 88 of both the outer and inner surface plates 84 and 86. They may be secured along their overlapping edges to the two surface plates by welding, or in any other well known manner. v

The frame 9() includes two relatively slidable window panes 96 which are adapted to slide therein. However, inasmuch as the details of the panes do not form any specific part of the invention, it is contemplated that instead of slidable panes such as disclosed, there may be a swingable single window pane. At the lower portion of the frame 90 there is a sill 98 which, starting midway between the marginal edges 92 and 94, slopes downwardly in a direction away from the inner surface plate 86 toward the outer surface plate 84. The sloping sill 98 insures that any rain water or other liquid falling thereon or also against the window panes 96, will be directed away from the inside of the'basement construction 20.

The shorter stiffeners 48 extend from the bottom of the section 30 up to the sill 98 of the window frame 9i), are secured between the outer and inner surface plates 84 and s 86 at their legs 49 and 50 provide vertical support for the two surface plates 84 and 86 and also for the marginal edges of the window frame. 90 accommodated in the aligned openings 88 therein.

The stiifener 54 at the one end of the prefabricated;

window section or unit 30, is secured in .alignment with its respective end of the section, and to the outer and inner surface plates 84 and 86 at its legs 49 and 50 respectively. The stiffener S4 thus serves as a female joining member in the same manner as described in sections 24, 26 and 28. lt is of the same channel-shaped construction as the shorter vertical stiffeners 48 and has its interconnecting the inner faces of the two surface plates 84 and 86, it is.

necessary to shim the space between its legs 58 and 6i)` with shims 62. The male joining member 56 is thus secured to its respective end of the section 30 by way of the shims 62, its narrowed interconnecting body portion extending outwardly beyond the end of the section.

Secured to the outer surface plate 84 is a corrugatedy member 64. Member 64, being like the previously described corrugated members secured to the prefabricated sections 24 and 26, has a flat lower portion 65 (Figs. 2` and 15) which is adapted to extend into the seat 38, while the remainder of the corrugations cover a portion of the plate 84 substantially equal to or greater than the height of the ground later to be backiilled against the basement assembly-20. It will be noted that the corrugations of the member 64 extend horizontally or widthwise of the section 30 to provide forces acting laterally of the section in opposition to the lateral forces of the backlled ground.`

As in the previously described sections, the corrugated member 64 need not extend to the fullest or lowest depth of the outer surface plate 84. It may start at a height from the bottom of this plate equal to the height of the legs of the channel-shaped seat 38 by eliminating the at 65.

After the support foundation 22 has been laid with the mastic sealing strip 40 positioned within the seat member 3S, a prefabricated corner section 24 is positioned in the support 22 at one corner thereof. The prcfabricated corner section 24 thus defines a corner of the basement construction 26. As noted previously in the detailed description of the section 24, it may be so positioned within the seat member 38 with its corrugated surface 64 extending into the seat at 65, or, if the corrugated member 64 does not contain a flat portion 65, the corrugated member will begin where the guiding legs of the seat member 38 end. Once the corner section 24 is properly positioned in a corner of the support 22, the basement is assembled by building up the walls on each side of the corner section.

This is accomplished by placing an intermediate prefabricated basicsection 26 adjacent to a side of the properly positioned corner section 24 as better seen in Figs. 1 and 2. The intermediate basic section adjoining the corner member will be so positioned with its male joining member 56 facing the female joining member S4 of the corner section 24, or, if the intermediate basic section is positioned on the other end of the corner section 24, with its female joining member 54 facing the male joining member 56 of the corner section.

The male and female joining members are thus intended to cooperate with each other whereby the interconnecting body portion of the male member fits between the legs 49 and 50 of the female joining member. The mating cooperation between the male and female joining members thus joins their respective sections together in adjacency.

Positioned between the interconnecting bodies of both respectively. The stiffeners 48k estarse the fernalefand male joining member`54and 5`6respectively, isa mastic orksealing strip100 (see Figs.y 2` and 3.).. The sealingstrip 100 extends foraportion of. the width ofthe interconnecting body portions lof thejoining mem-v member 64 of the adjoining corner section 24 equal toy the thickness of the mastic sealing strip 100. The space created between the adjacent adjoined ends of sections 24 and 26 is filled by a fluid resistantsealing member 102. The member 102 may also be a mastic strip which can extend for the full length'of the adjoining sections.`

After the intermediate prefabricated section 26 is moved into adjoining relationship withthe corner section 24 as above described, the two sections are then secured together from relative movement by securing screwso'r bolts 104. The sections 2'4 and 26 are secured at' their lower outer surfaces by extending a screw 104 through the cooperating legs 49 and 60 of adjoining stiifeners` 54 and 56. The inner lower surface of the adjoined'sections V2'4'and 26 are secured together by another screw. 104 (not visible) passing through the cooperating legs 50"and59 of the same adjoining stiffeners. The two securing screws 104 pass through sets of aligned holes 106 already provided in the lower portions of adjoining stiffener'members 54 and 56 of the prefabricated sections 24 and 26.

Although just the two screws 104 are applied to secure the adjoined sections together` one each at the inner and outer surfaces thereof, it will be recognized that if it becornes necessary, more may be utilized along the length of adjoining stiffeners.

The walls of the basement 20 are completed by adding the desired number of intermediate prefabricated sections 26, 28 -and 30 to the seat 38 according to the basement plan. Inasrnuch as each prefabricated section has the same 4adjoining stiifener members 54 and 56 as the next adjacent section, they are placed into position in'tne seat 38 so that male and female joining members will' coopcrate to provide a joint therebetween as previously described. v

Each joint between each adjoining Prefabricated section will include the sealing means 100 and 1:02 to provide an air and fluid-tight connection therebetween. The addition of securing means 104 at the lower joined portions of the sections retain them from relative movement. A

As each wall of the basement construction 20 is completed, it is capped with a structure previously identified by the numeral 32 (see Fig. 3). The capping structure 32 comprises channel-shaped members 108 similar in structure and dimensions to the seat member 38. Cap members 108 have two downwardly extending legs 110 and 112 which, when positioned to cover a completed I or, ifaprefabricated window section 30 is employed at the stiifeners 54 and 56.'

The cap' structure 32 includes studs 116 which are` secured, as by welding, to the body of' the member 108 to extendl upwardly therefrom.

blocks of a building structure which is to be completed above ythe prefabricated basement'20.

Studs 1116 forming a part of the capping structure 32, may be secured on the body of the member 108 at the factory if desired, or, they may be added thereto after the cap member is in place over its respective basement wall.

(Fig. 1) above the corner sections 24, may be welded closed or filled with `a sealing ller similar to the mastic members and y102.

Before the ground is backiilled about the walls'of the basement I20, a fluid sealing or water resistant material is placed over the outer surface ofthe walls thereof to eliminate any possibility of seepage. Material such as tar, may be brushed or sprayedthereon or a mastic sealer may be troweled or shoton. Oxidation within the sealed, joined prefabricated sections may be avoided by providing air holes in the inner surface of each section.

From the foregoing it will be clear that the disclosure presents a basement construction which, whether it eX- tends completely below the level of the ground thereabout, or only partially therebelow, is weatherproof. lts combination of novel huid-tightly joined prefabricated cooperating weather resistant, waterproof sections, eliminates seepage of the type which normally affects concrete or other -similar porous structures. The disclosed cooperating prefabricated sections or units utilized therein, being simple in structure, light in weight, and therefore easily handled and managed, present, because of their unique details of construction, a unitary basement assembly which is materially stronger and more resistant to lateral, horizontal and vertical forces exerted thereon than hithertoiknown basement or sub-soil. structures.

While there have been shown and described and pointed out the fundamental novel'features ofthe invention as applied' to apreferred embodiment thereof, it will be` understood thatvarious omissions'and'substitutions and changes in theformand details of the device illustrated and in its operation may be madeby those skilled in the art, without departing from thelspirit of' the invention. It is the intention, therefore, to be limited only as indi- `v cated byv the :scope of the claims appended hereto.

wall of the basement construction, provide a top guide l rjoined Prefabricated sections therebeneath by additional securing means 104. The additionalv screws 104 extend through the legs and 112 of the cap member'108 and into the holes '114 provided alongthe tops of each of. the prefabricatedY sections. y

It will be noted that the holes '114 are provided in the Prefabricated sections in the stiifeners thereof, thus the cap member 108 is secured to the plurality of prefabri'- `cated sections therebeneath at the stiffeners thereof, namely, the stiffeners 48, `54 and `56 of sections 24 and 26; at the stiifeners 48, 48u, 54 and S6, if a prefabricated door section 28 is utilized in the basement construction,

"I claim:

l. Prefabricatedl units for a basement assembly, each Vunitcornprising spaced inner and outer surface platesfa male channel-shaped joint at one end of said unit', a female channel-shaped rjoint at the other end of said unit, said female joint having spaced channel legs secured inv end alignment with one end of said spaced plates and with the body portionthereof extending inwardly of its respective end of said unit, said male joint having a body portion ynarrower in Width than the space between said, legs'of said female member, the legsr` of said male. joint being spacedV from said spaced plates, take-up means between said legs of said male joint and said spaced plates to secure the former'to the latter, the

` 'legs and bodyl'portioli` oli-"said male joint being coopefabiefrt the legsr anfrbody portion of said. female jbint"of `a 'nextadjacentunit to join said units together lwithay space definedvbetween the joiningvmale 'and female body portions, strip sealing' means 'secured in position by and between said spaced body portions of said cooperating male( and V:female joints and extending for a portion-of`the width of said space therebetween and for the length thereof, a corrugated member mounted on said outer plateextending for the'width thereffand for lt will be recognized ythat the studs 11'6 afford an anchor means for the sill asisten" gations of said corrugated member extending horizontally of said unit sealing means between said corrugated members of adjacent sections, a footing including an upwardly facing channel shaped seat means in which said sections are seated, and sealing means in said seat means on which said sections are fluid tightly seated when `the same are in said seat means.

2. A Prefabricated basement assembly comprising in combination an elongated concrete footing having a channel-shaped groove extending the length thereof, a channel-shaped seat member in said groove extendingfor the length thereof, sealing means laid in said seat mem'- ber extending for the width and length thereof and on which prefabricated basement sections are adapted to rest, a plurality of Prefabricated open-ended basement sections each seated at their open ends in said seat member on said sealing means to be water tightly sealed thereby and retained in relative alignment by the sides of the channel-shape of said seat member, each of said prefabricated sections including parallel inner and outer surface plates and spaced stiffeners vertically disposed between said plates to retain the same in their parallel relationship, certain of said stiieners comprising male and female joining means with the male of one of said prefabricated sections being yadapted to t within and form a joint with a female of an adjacent aligned prefabricated section, sealing means secured in position between the length andwidth of said joined male and female joints to seal the' same and retained therebetween by said join-t, corrugated support means secured to the outer surface of each of said sections to provide support therefor in a lateral direction, sealing means secured between said support means of adjacent prefabricated sections, cap means extending for the length of said aiignedprefabricated sections along the tops thereof to retain the tops of said sections in said aligned relationship, means securing said cap means to said aligned sections, yand sealing means covering said sections on the outside thereof to at least the height of ground backtilled thereagainst.

3. A Prefabricated basement assembly comprising in combination, a concrete channel shaped footing,'a chaunel shaped seat member in said footing, sealing means in said seat member, a plurality of open-ended prefabricated sections, said sections each seated in adjoining relationship in said sealing means in the seat member at their open ends, end positioned vertically disposed mating channel shaped male and female joining means including spaced legs on each of said sections cooperating to join the same, fluid tight seal means between said male and female joining means of said adjoining sections, cap means covering each of said sections, and securing meansV cooperating with said cap means and each of said joined sections at the legs of said mating joining means to secure the cap means and sections from relative movement.A

4. A basement assembly comprising a plurality of prefabricated adjacent sections each of which comprise spaced inner and outer plates, corrugated members secured to said outer plates and having their corrugations extending horizontally thereof, a plurality of stiifeners supporting said plates in parallelism and positioned therebetween, one of said stiifeners having a pair of spaced legs each one of which is secured to one of said plates on a body spaced inwardly from the ends of the plates to form a female joining member, a second one of saidv stiieners secured to said plates and having a body extending out wardly from the ends thereof to form a male joining member, said sections each being positioned with the body Y of, sealing means between said corrugated members of the adjacent sections, an upwardly directed channel shaped seat for receipt of said sections therein, and sealing means in said channel shaped seat on which 'said sections are placed within said seat to define a water-tight seal between said seat and said sections therein.

S. In a basement assembled from a pluralityof adjai cent sections each of which comprises spaced facing inner.

and outer surface plates, a male joint at one end of each section, a female joint at the other end of each section, said female joint including a channel shaped memberv having its legs secured in end alignment with one end of: said inner and outer plates and with the body portionl thereof extending inwardly of its respective end of said section, said male joint including a channel shaped mem-' ber having a body portion narrower in width than the space between said legs of said female member, the legs; of said male joint being spaced from said plates, shims between said legs of` said male joint and said plates to secure the former to the latter, the legs and body portion of said male joint being cooperahle with the legs and body portion of the female joint to join adjacent sections, fluid sealing means positioned between and for a portion of the width of the body portions of said cooperating male and female joints and for the lengths thereof to seal the same uid tightly, and corrugated members formed integral with the outer plates of each section to the height of the ground backlled thereagainst, the corrugations of said members extending horizontally to forni a reinforcing wall about said outer plates, sealing means between said corrugated members, a channel shaped footl ing, an upwardly directed channel shaped seat member in said footing, and sealing means in said seat member against which the joined adjacent sections seat fluid tightly when seated in said seat member.

6. In a basement assembly a channel shaped footing, an upwardly directed channel shaped seat member in said footing, sealing means in said seat member, a plurality of open-ended prefabricated corner and intermediate sections adjoining each other to dene a basement, said sections each being seated in adjoining relationship on said seal@ ing means in said seat member to be uid tightly engaged therewith on their open ends, selected ones of said intermediatesections including a window, selected others of said intermediate sections including a door, each of said sections having stiffener means, certain of said stiifener means including male and female means to join said sections, cap means fully covering said sections, corrugated members formed integral with the outer surface of each section and having its corrugations extending horizontally thereof, securing means securing said sections and cap means together at said male and female joining means, and lluid tight sealing means between said corrugated members of adjacent sections.

7. In a basement assembly as in claim 6, said pre- 4fabricated corner section comprising spaced inner and outer parallel surfaces each having a basement comer forming bend, a plurality of stiffeners secured to and between said surfaces, said outer surface having a continuous plate bent intermediate its ends to form two walls, said inner surface including an inner plate spaced from one of said walls to certain of said stiffeners and a second inner plate spaced from the other of said walls by certain other of said stiifeners, said corrugated members including at least a corrugated member secured to each one of said two walls at the outside thereof, and a further corrugated member bridging said two corrugated members.

8. A basement construction comprising a footing having an upwardly facing channel shaped seat, sealing means in said seat, open ended prefabricated corner sections mounted in said seat against said sealing means at their open ends to form therewith a huid-tightly sealed corner of the basement, prefabricated open-ended intermediate sections mounted in said seat on said sealing means at their open ends to form therewith fluid-tight walls of the basement, each of said sections including and vertically disposed channel shaped stitfeners therein telescopically engageable and joining said sections together, cap means mounted over the tops of said sections to cover the same, corrugated members mounted on the outer surfaces of said sections and having the corrugations thereof extending horizontally of each section, means securing said sections and cap means to gether at said joining stiffeners, fluid sealing means between and extending for a portion of the width and for the lengths of said cooperating joining stiieners to seal the same uid tightly, and sealing means between said corrugated members of adjacent sections.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,295,368 Pilkington Feb. 25, 1919 Sandell Oct. 15, 1935 20 Mauser July' 2l, Wetherbee Jan. 11, Stolz Jan. 10, Jumper et al. Dec. 26, Morgan June 25, Grubb July 30, Scott Jan. 6, Peremi et al June 30, Miller Aug. 10, Brinker July 4, 'Iurner Sept. 1l, Shepheard Mar. 18, Milone Dec. 6, Dunn May 1, Jackson Sept. 11, Johnson et al. Oct. 16, Hawkinson 4... Oct. 14,

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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/269, 52/270, 52/300, 52/277, 52/783.11, 52/274, 52/631, 52/293.3
International ClassificationE02D17/02, E04B1/00, E04C2/34, E02D17/04
Cooperative ClassificationE02D17/04, E04C2/34, E04B1/0015
European ClassificationE04C2/34, E02D17/04, E04B1/00B1