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Publication numberUS2916197 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 8, 1959
Filing dateMay 6, 1957
Priority dateMay 6, 1957
Publication numberUS 2916197 A, US 2916197A, US-A-2916197, US2916197 A, US2916197A
InventorsDetrie Arthur J, Lingenfelter Daniel J, O'neil Eugene J, Stayboldt Paul J, Troeger Edgar P
Original AssigneeDouglas Aircraft Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Compartmented container
US 2916197 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. J. DETRIE ET AL 2,916,97

COMPARTMENTED CONTAINER Dec. 8, 1959 2 Sheets-Shea?l l Dec. 8, 1959 A. J. DETRIE ETAL COMPARTMENTED CONTAINER Filed May 6, 1957 2 Sl'xee'cs-Slwe'rl 2 BY/ Y United States Patent() COMPARTMENTED CONTAINER Arthur J. Detrie, Ruston, La., and Daniel J. Lingenfelter, Glendale, Eugene J. ONeil, Canoga Park, and Paul J'. fStayboldt and Edgar P. Troeger, Los Angeles, Calif., assignors to Douglas Aircraft Company, Inc., Santa Monca, Calif.

Application May 6, 1957,'Serial No. 657,332

Claims. (Cl. 229--56) This invention vrelates to containers and lmore particularly to compartmented containers for segregating various materials which may be readily combined before use without ldanger of contamination, change in proportions or, in the case of reactants, premature mixing.

The container of the present invention in the broadest aspects thereof consists of a flexible film envelope divided into a plurality of compartments by a rupturable divider or separable fastener either of which acting as a barrier will adequately separate such ingredients as solid, paste, liquid and powdered materials. The exterior of the container adjacent the divider or fastener is provided with tabs or wings which may be gripped to facilitate rupturing or separating the barrier which divides the container into Vplural compartments when it is desired to bring together and mixthe contents of the various compartments.

Realization of the extensive utility of a compartmented container for distribution of single charges or doses has caused certainrindustries interested in such distribution to actively search for such an envelope or package. Pre requisites of such a container, lacking in those heretofore proposed, vare `that `it be capable of reliably keeping premeasured ingredients separate, and that it be provided with means for insuring a positive and simple removalof the separating medium just prior to the use of the ingredients. Such a package insures that the several ingredient substances are combined in proper proportion yand quantityI without the user having to trouble to measure lthe portions 'of `a'mixture and even without his needing -to know what lthe substances or their proportions are.

The Vpresent invention `eliminates many 'problems connected with storage such as the presence of multiple containers -requiring coordination. Aside from eld applications it eliminates deterioration of stocks due to repeated opening of containers and also avoids the necessity for refrigeration'of a mixed sealant.

The necessity of Weighing scales with the attendant problems of trained operators `to properly measure out ingredients is also obviated. Ready availability is also present for ingredients can be `rnixed ready for use in a few minutes time.

Such a multiple part package is particularly desirable in fthe aircraft industryfor use with such materials as sealants, adhesives and potting compounds. In field opverations it is 'essential that such materials be carried to remote `spots vand that the application be reliably and expeditiously completed. For example, a considerable degree ofsuccessthas been` achieved in industrial and el'dus'e ofiepoxythermosetting plastic resins as insulating andsealing materials. Y

vVarious formulationsand typesof liquid and solid epoxy resins are now used by manufacturers for encapsulating andin'sulating-manytypes of components and assemblies. As indicated, manytield yapplications also existfinfwhich epoxy resins can be used to upgradev job quality fan'dredu'ceco'st' through labor saving. The multipl'e rbagwcontainer of lthefp'resent `inventionvis well adapted to such eld use, for liquid epoxy resins require 2,916,197 Patented Dec. 8, 1959 ythe raddition and mixing in of a suitable hardener, or

catalyst, in order to react to the solid state. The compartmented field-use film package is rthus adapted to permit handling and mixing of accurately proportioned amounts of resin and hardener. By means of the exterior tabs or ears the separating barrier is ruptured, or, if the barrier consists of the separable fastener, it is disengaged and mixing is accomplished by kneading the package with the hands until a satisfactory mixture is attained. One of the two components may contain a dye as an indicator of uniform mixing. Mixing lis thus accomplished in a very short time without error or the requirement of yspecial skill. Pouring of the resin can then proceed immediately around whatever component is 'to be insulated. Similar bags using sealant with a powdered accelerator have also been utilized successfully in `field use.

Suggestions heretofore made for storing separately ingredients to be mixed before using have not met Wide success because of the unreliability of the sealing medium, and the difficulty of providing a method of quickly and positively communicating the various compartments without danger of `rupturing the containers themselves. These deficiencies have resulted from the fact that it was necessary to rupture the frangible barrier separating the plural compartments in one of two Ways. Normally the medium dividing the compartments was removed by plucking at the sides of the container and pulling until the vbarrier joint failed. However, a second alternative has also been utilized; namely, squeezing one end vof 'the envelope, thus urging the contents of one compartment pressurally against the barrier until the barrier ruptured. These methods were available because the membrane or bonded joint while supposedly sturdy enough to permit rough handling could be removed by plucking or squeezing. The deficiencies heretofore present become clear when it is realized, in either method of eliminating the dividing membrane, that the barrier had to be considerably weaker than the bag itself so as to avoid rupture of `the main container when squeezing or plucking. In making the barrier Weak, the problem frequently encountered was leakage through the division and consequent premature mixing. The present invention obviates these deficiencies by utilizing means on the exterior of the container to facilitate barrier removal, and also features a novel application of a separable fastener as the sealing medium, thereby appreciably increasing strength against leakage but permitting easy disengagement.

lThere is thus provided a container to hold materials of different kinds and types, and to retain them separately from each other so that the opportunity to combineahead of time will be avoided; yet the structure is such that a minor mechanical manipulation will bring all the ingredients into contact with each other and made ready for use in their combined form and easily taken from the container to be put to that use.

Other features and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawing in which:

Figure 1 is a plan view of the container of the present invention;

Figure 2` is a sectional View taken along the line 2-2 of Figure 1;

FigureS is a sectional view taken along the line 3 3 of Figure 1;

Figure 4 is a view similar tol-ligure 3 with the external tabs omitted showing a modified form of the barrier which divides the container into plural compartments;

Figure 5 is a view similar to Figure 3 showing a' modilied form ofthe external tabs;

Figure 6 is a perspective view of a modiied form of the present invention with portions broken away to more Y clearly indicate certain details;

Figure 7 is a sectional view taken on line 7-7 of Figure 6;

Figure 8 is a view similar to Figure 7 showing another embodiment of the present invention; and

Figure 9 is a fragmentary perspective view of the present invention showing the external tabs being gripped to exert a separating force on the dividing barrier.

Referring now to the drawing and particularly to Figures 1, 2 and 3 thereof, there is shown a bag or envelope 12 formed by uniting two opposing sheet members 13 and 14 of thin exible material along two peripheral edges 15 and 17. In these and other figures, the thickness of the sheets is exaggerated for clarity of illustration. Although polyethylene is now preferred, the containerg12 may be of any flexible sheet material found suitable for holding and protecting the particular substances which are to be enclosed. Polyethylene, as indicated, or cellophane and the like cellulosic sheets are especially useful, because varieties which are impervious to humidity are available. Material of this type which is thermoplastic can be had so that two plies of such can be sealed together by heat and pressure, constituting a welding of the material as shown at 15 and 17. If desired, crimping at the ends to strengthen such a heat and pressure seal is also easily done. Relatively long lengths of tubes of cellophane and the like material, are available commercially at low cost, being made by known machines. Such a tube of great length can be cut successively to provide a multiplicity of the container of Figure l. If such tubes are utilized it is apparent that the two opposing sheet members 13 and 14 will form one integral piece with open ends 18 and 19. The welds 15 and 17 depicted in Figures l and 2 would therefore be unnecessary.

In Figures 1 and 3 the container 12 has been subjected to heat and pressure along the path 20 to form a weld,

thereby making opposite sides 13 and 14 of the container 12 adhere together strongly along this path and providing a separation of the interior of the container into two compartments 22 and 23. Although in Figure 3, the barrier, separating compartments 22 and 23, is shown as a line of adhesion between sheet members 13 and 14, it will be understood, as shown in Figure 4, that the separating medium may consist of a piece of material 21 the same as or similar to the typeused in the container 12 which may be fastened as at 26 and 31, respectively, to the interior surfaces of opposing sheet members 13 and 14, respectively, by means of a heat seal or otherwise, thus providing a membrane 21 dividing the container 12 into a multiple part package. Although external tabs or ears are omitted from the embodiment of the invention shown in Figure 4, it is understood that tabs similar to those depicted in either Figure 3 or Figure 5 are to be used in conjunction with the membrane 21.

As shown in Figure 3, fastened to the exterior walls 24 and 25, respectively, of sheet members 13 and 14, respectively, adjacent the weld 20 are two tabs or ears 27 and 28. These tabs are shown as elongate generally rectangular wings joined to the container 12 at 29 and 30. The tabs 27 and 28 may be composed of any relatively thin flexible material and may be joined to the container 12 by any suitable attaching or bonding means. Applicants now prefer to make the tabs of polyethylene and to secure them to the container by the heat and pressure seal previously described and shown at 15 and 17 in Figures 1 and 2. If desired the tabs may be placed in position pr1or to forming the weld path 20` and one application of heat and pressure will cause sheet members 13 and 14 to adhere together and will also rmly amx the tabs to the exterior sides 24 and 25 in the correct position to be utilized as hereinafter set forth.

However it is preferable to fasten the container together along the weld 20 and then to fasten the tabs 27 and 28 to the container 12, in a manner which will assure armer bond along the jointure lines 29 and 30 than that existing along the weld line 20. In Figures 1 and 3 the jointure lines 29 and 30, respectively, of the wings 27 and 28, respectively, are shown offset to one side of the jointure line 20 which divides the container 12 into separate compartments. This assures that if a heat weld is used it will be possible to apply heat and pressure in a manner to secure a weld of greater strength at 29 and G0 than at 20. This can of course, also be accomplished by utilizing a different adhesion or attachment method when securing the tabs than that used to fasten the sides of the container together along the path 20. It is important that, when the tabs are pulled, the exerting force will not tear them loose from the container but rather that the separating barrier will be removed to permit the containers ingredients to be intermixed.

As shown more clearly in Figures 6 and 9, the line of jointure 32 of tab 33 extends the full width of the vcontainer 34 and the jointure line is placed intermediate the free ends 35 iand 37 which can be gripped to exert the rupturing force. In Figures 6 and 9 the two ends 38 and 39 of the tab 33 are also ailixed to the container 34. This insures that the tabs are held close to the container, thereby avoiding the possibility of an inadvertent rupture lyet permitting the free edges 35 and 37 to be gripped when it is desired to intercommunicate the two parts 40 and 42 of the container 34. Such Iadditional attachment also helps to assure the necessary bond between the tabs and the container.

In the embodiment of the present invention shown in Figure 5 the free ends of the tabs are shown as terminating in thickened portions 43 and 44 to permit a firmer grip by the user. The terminal portion may be formed by doubling the ends of `the tab over and applying heat and pressure or by any other suitable means.

In'the embodiment of the present invention shown in Figures 6 and 7 the barrier between the two compartments is provided by a separable fastener. The fastener comprises two identical strips 48 and 49 formed of a resilient material which may be molded or extruded into the desired finished shapes. Each strip 48 and 49 comprises a plane web portion 50 and 52, respectively, and a thickened marginal portion 53 and 54, respectively. Each of said thickened marginal portions is provided with parallel grooves, or channels 55 and 56, and 58 and 59 respectively, and with parallel ridges, or projections, 61 and 62 and 64 and 65, respectively. The channels 55 and 56 in the marginal portion 53 correspond with the ridges 64 and 65 in the marginal portion 54 and vice versa. The depth and height axis of said channels and ridges are perpendicular to the plane of their respective web portions 48 and 49. The separable fastener is more fully shown and described in United States Patent No. 2,558,367 and United States Patent No. 2,637,085 both issued in the name of Borge Madsen.

The two strips 48 and 49 respectively are fastened by a heat seal or other bonding means to the interior of the container 34 as shown at 66 and 68 respectively in Figures 6 and 7. The external tabs are the same configuration as previously described. It has been found that it facilitates disengagement of the zipper or separable fastener when the tabs and strips 48 and 49 are positioned as shown in Figure 8 which permits the user to in effect u'nroll the interlocking grooves and ridges by exerting a force on the tabs outwardly and in a direction along the length of the container thereby in effect causing each zipper portion 48 and 49, respectively, to release by pivoting about itsline of connection 66 and 68 respectively rto the container.

The container of Figure 1 is ready for its compartments to be filled and sealed in succession. Either compartment may receive its contents rst through open end 18 or 19. The end is then closed by being sealed tightly by any suitable means. The other compartment is then filled and vits end similarly sealed. A heat seal, adhesive gum, or stitching canbe used if preferred.

The compartments may equal or vary from each other in capacity, Aas desired. When it is 'desired to combine and use the ingredient substances the exterior tabs are gripped as shown in Figure 9. If the barrier is composed of a heat seal or membrane as previously described the exerting force is normal to the container and applied by pulling in opposite directions on the tabs. As hereinabove pointed out, the indirect methods of rupturing the separatingbarrier in previous containers necessitated a barrier considerably weaker than the bag itself to insure that the barrier rather than the'main container would rupture when the previously described squeezing or plucking techniques were utilized. Such a weakened barrier frequently resulted in leakage through the division and consequent premature mixing. Because of the positive separating actionV provided by the tabs or ears attached to the exterior walls of sheet members 13 and 14, it is possibleto provide a barrier, such as the membrane Z1, which is substantially stronger, relative to the strengthof the materialforming `the sheet members 13 and 14, than practicable in previous containers, thus eliminating the barrier leakage problem previously encountered.y If the barrier is composed of the separable fastener of Figures 6 and 7 it has been found to be easily disengaged by gripping the external tabs and sliding 'the interlocking portions of the zipper in'opposite lateral directions. If

the embodiment used is that Vpictured in Figure 8 they unfolding operation previously described is utilized.

With the barrier removed mixing 'is accomplished by kneading the package with the hands until the desired mixing is obtained. The ingredients are then dispensed directly from the package after a'corner has been cut away.

Although the now preferred embodiments of theA present invention have been shown and described herein, it is to be understood that the invention is not to be limited thereto,` for it is susceptible to changes in form and detailwithin the scope'of the appended claims.

' We claim:

1. A compartmented container comprising: two mutually overlying generally rectangular sheets of thin flexible material united at two opposite peripheral edges and adapted to be united at the'two other opposite edges; internal dividing "means secured to the interior wall of'said sheets`dividing said container into a plurality 'of compartments; said dividing means being formed of a resilient material and consisting of two mating members with opposed interlocking channels and grooves adapted to be forced together into an interlocked position to form a dividing barrier between said plurality of compartments, one ofV saidl members being secured tothe interiorsurface of one ofl said sheets along a trans'- verse jointure line and the other said `memb`er being secured to the interior surface of the other said sheet along another transversejointure line, both of said join- Plines being legate@ smartsite Qn@ another on the same side of the barrier formed when said channels and grooves are in said interlocked position; and separating means fastened to the exterior sides of said sheets adjacent said internal dividing means, said separating means being formed as elongate generally rectangular strips of thin flexible material fastened at one portion to the said exterior sides and at least one portion of said strips remaining free to be gripped.

2. A compartmented container for packaging two or more components separately comprising: two mutually overlying sheets of thin flexible material united at their peripheral edges and separated into a plurality of compartments by internal dividing means; one of said components in each of said compartments; said dividing means being formed of a resilient material with interlocking channels and grooves; and separating means fastened to the exteriorsides `of said overlying sheets adjacent said internal dividing means, said' separatingmeans being formed as :thin elongate strips of thin flexible material fastened at one portion to the said exterior sides and at least one portion of said strips remaining fr'ee to be gripped.

3. A compartmented container for packaging twol or more components separately comprising: two mutually overlying generally rectangular sheets of thin exible material united'peripherally; internal dividing means "secured to the interior wall of said sheets dividing said container intoa plurality of compartments; one of said cornponents in`V each of said compartments; said'dividing means being formed of a resilient material and consist= ing'of two mating members with opposed interlocking channels and grooves adapted to be forced togethei into an interlocked position to form a dividing barrier between said plurality of compartments, one of said'members being secured to the interior surface of one of s'aid sheetsalong a transverse jointure lineand the other said member being secured to the interior 'surface of the other said sheet along another transverse jointure line, both'of said jointure lines being located opposite vone another ou the same side of the barrier formed when said channels and grooves are in said interlocked position; and separating means fastened to the exterior sides `of'said sheets adjacent s'aid internal'dividing means, said separating means being formed as elongatev generallyrectangular strips of thin flexible material fastened at one portion to the said exterior sides and `at least one portion of said strips remaining free to be gripped.

4. A` compartmented containerv comprising: two mutually overlying generally rectangular sheets of thin liex-` ible material united at two opposite peripheral edges and adapted to be united at the two`other opposite edges; internal dividing mAeans Secured to the' interior wall of said sheets dividing said container into a plurality of compartments; said dividing means being formed of a resilient material and consisting of two mating 'members with` opposed interlocking channels and grooves adapted to' be forced together 'into an interlocked position' to form a dividing barrier between said plurality of 'compartments, one of said members being secured`to the interior surface of one of said sheets along a transverse jointure line and the other said member being secured to the interior surface of the other said sheet along another transverse. jointure line, said jointure lines being located. on opposite sides of the barrier formed when said channels and grooves are in said interlocked position; and separating means fastened to the exterior sides of said' sheets adjacent the respectivey jointure linesy of said two mating members, said separating means being formed as elongate generally rectangular strips of thin exible material fastened at one portion top the said exterior, sides and at least one portion of said strips remaining free,

and 'adapted fg bef uilitat 'ih lWO otheropposite edges;

internalbdividing means secured to the interior walls of said sheets dividing said container into a plurality of compartments; said dividing means being formed of a resilient material and consisting of two mating members with opposed interlocking channels and grooves adapted to be forced together into an interlocked position to form a dividing barrier between said plurality of compartments, one of said members being secured to the interior surface of one of said sheets along a transverse jointure line and the other said member being secured to the interior surface of the other said sheet along another transverse jointure line, said jointure lines being located on opposite sides of the barrier formed when said channels and grooves are in said interlocked position; separating means fastened to the exterior sides of said sheets adjacent the respective jointure lines of said two mating members, said separating means being formed as elongate generally rectangular strips of thin flexible material fastened at one portion to the said exterior sides and at least one portion of said strips remaining free to be gripped; and said strips having edge ridges along a thin portion to facilitate gripping to exert a transverse sliding separating force on said internal dividing means.

6. A compartmented container comprising: two mutually overlying sheets of thin flexible material united peripherally along two opposite edges and adapted to be united along two other opposite edges and separated into a plurality of compartments by internal dividing means; said dividing means being formed of a resilient material with interlocking channels and grooves; and separating means fastened to the exterior sides of said overlying sheets adjacent said internal dividing means, said separating means being formed as thin elongate strips of thin flexible material fastened at one portion to the said exterior sides and at least one portion of said strips remaining free to be gripped.

7. A compartmented container for packaging two or more components separately comprising: two mutually overlying generally rectangular sheets of thin flexible material united peripherally; internal dividing means secured to the interior wall of said sheets dividing said container into a plurality of compartments; one of said components in each of said compartments; said dividing means being formed of a resilient material and consisting of two mating members with opposed interlocking channels and grooves adapted to -be forced together into an interlocked position to form a dividing barrier between said plurality of compartments, one of said members being secured to the interior surface of one of said sheets along a transverse jointure line and the other said member being secured to the interior surface of the other said sheet along another transverse jointure line, said jointure lines being located on opposite sides of the barrier formed when said channels and grooves are in said interlocked position; and separating means fastened to the exterior sides of said sheets adjacent the respective jointure lines of said two mating members, said separating means being formed as elongate generally rect-angular strips of thin flexible material fastened at one portion to the said exterior sides and at least one portion of said strips remaining free to be gripped.

8. A compartmented container for storing two or more components separately comprising: two mutually overlying sheets of thin flexible material united at their peripheral edges and separated into a plurality of compartments by internal dividing means; one of said components 'in each of said compartments; said dividing means being formed of a resilient material with interlocking channels and grooves; and separating means fastened to the exterior sides of said overlying sheets adjacent said internal dividing means, said separating means being formed as elongate rectangular strips of thin exible material fastened transversely along their center portion to the said exterior sides and being fastened at opposite longitudinal ends to said exterior sides, the two remaining free ends each being formed with a thin portion and a relatively thicker portion to facilitate gripping to exert a releasing force on said internal dividing means.

9. A compartmented container for packaging two or more components separately comprising: two mutually overlying generally rectangular sheets of thin flexible material united peripherally; internal dividing means secured to the interior walls of said sheets dividing said container into a plurality of compartments; one of said components in each of said compartments; said dividing means -being formed of a resilient material and consisting of two mating members with opposed interlocking channels and grooves adapted to be forced together into an interlocked position to form a dividing barrier between said plurality of compartments, one of said members being secured to the interior surface of one of said sheets along a transverse jointure line and the other said member being secured to the interior surface of the other said sheet along another transverse jointure line, said jointure lines being located on opposite sides of the barrier formed when said channels and grooves are in said interlocked position; separating means fastened to the exterior sides of said sheets adjacent the respective jointure lines of said two mating members, said separating means being formed as elongate generally rectangular strips of thin flexible material fastened at one portion to the said exterior sides and at least one portion of said strips remaining free to be gripped; and said strips having edge ridges along a thin portion to facilitate gripping to exert a transverse sliding separating force on said internal dividing means.

10. A compartmented container comprising: two mutually overlying sheets of thin flexible material united at two opposite peripheral edges and adapted to be united at the two other opposite edges and separated into a plurality of compartments by internal dividing means; said dividing means being formed of a resilient material with interlocking channels and grooves; and separating means fastened lto the exterior sides of said overlying sheets adjacent said internal dividing means, said separating means lbeing formed as elongate rectangular strips of thin llexible material fastened transversely along their center portion to the said exterior sides and being fastened at opposite longitudinal ends to said exterior sides, the two remaining free ends each being formed with a thin portion and a relatively thicker portion to facilitate gripping to exert a releasing force on said internal dividing means.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,245,738 Taylor June 17, 1941 2,558,367 Madsen .Tune 26, 1951 2,676,702 Whitefoot Apr. 27, 1954 2,756,874 Erickson et al. July 31, 1956 2,756,875 Yochim July 31, 1956 2,771,724 Hosier et al. Nov. 27, 1956

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Classifications
U.S. Classification206/219, 206/221, 428/124, 383/63, 493/189, 206/223, 428/126, 428/595, 428/198, 428/609, 206/222, 428/594
International ClassificationB65D33/25, B65D81/32
Cooperative ClassificationB65D81/3266, B65D33/2508
European ClassificationB65D81/32H1, B65D33/25A