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Publication numberUS2917002 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 15, 1959
Filing dateNov 23, 1956
Priority dateNov 23, 1956
Publication numberUS 2917002 A, US 2917002A, US-A-2917002, US2917002 A, US2917002A
InventorsAnthony Mascaro
Original AssigneeAnthony Mascaro
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pump
US 2917002 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

INVENTORI ANTHONY MASCARO av W FIGI.

A. MASCARO PUMP 23 61D m 515 I I Dec 15, 1959 Fmled Nov. 23, 1956 FIG 2 Dec. 15, 1959 A. MASCARO 2,917,002

PUMP

2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Nov. 23, 1956 FIGIZ. Z6 Z5 f7 65 mvawronz ANTHONY MASCARO United States Patent PUMP Anthony Mascaro, West Point, Pa. Application November 23, 1956, Serial No. 624,153 12 Claims. (Cl. 103-149) The present invention relates to pumps, and more particularly to a pump for pumping liquids having a high solid content. This application is a continuation-in-part of my co'pending application Ser. No. 564,293, filed February 8, 1956, now abandoned.

Prior to the present invention, considerable difficulty has been encountered in handling liquids having a high solid content. The conventional pumps are not entirely satisfactory since the solid content in the liquid imparts considerable wear on the operating parts of the pump. In addition, the conventional pumps are necessarily large and are not adapted for installation in confined areas.

With the foregoing in mind, a primary object of the present invention is to provide a novel pump which is not adversely affected by high solid content in the liquid being pumped.

Another object of the present inventionis to provide a pump which is durable, yet is readily disassembled for replacement and repair of the parts.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a compact pump which is of simple construction and of highly economical manufacture, but is fully effective in pumping liquids having a high solid content.

All of the objects of the present invention and the various features and details of the construction and operation thereof are more fully set forth hereinafter with reference to the accompanying drawing in which:

Fig. 1 is a view in elevation of a pump made in accordance with the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a transverse vertical section through the pump body;

3 is a horizontal section taken on the line 3-3 of Fig. Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a view showing the operation of the pump impeller;

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary perspective view of the tubing for carrying the liquid through the pump;

Fig. 6 is a perspective view of the mounting plate for the tubing;

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary perspective view of the mounting plate showing details of its construction;

Fig. 8 is a perspective view of a modified form of conduit or tubing which may be used in lieu of the tubing shown in Figs. 1 to 7;

Fig. 9 is a transverse section on the line 99 of Fig. 8;

Fig. 10 is a fragmentary view of the tubing prior to its assembly in the pump;

Fig. ll is a view similar to Fig. 2 showing the operatio'n of the pump and embodying the tubing shown in Fig. 10; and

Fig. 12 is a sectional view taken on the line 12-12 of Fig. ll.

Referring now to the drawing, the assembly illustrated in Figs. 1 to 7 comprises a pump housing 10 mounted on a gear box 11, for example, by studs 12. The gear box, in turn, mounts a motor M for driving the pump. Driving connections are provided between the motor M and the pump body through the gear box 11 which is ice coupled to the shaft 15 of the pump by a coupler 16 (see Fig. 1). The shaft 15 is journalled in the pump housing 10 in suitable bearings indicated at 17 and 18 respectively, and mounts an impeller 21 keyed thereto as indicated at 21a. As shown in Fig. 2, the shaft 15 is threaded as indicated at 22, 22 to receive lock nuts 23, 23 which adjustably position the impeller 21 axially on the shaft 15.

The impeller 21 operates to pump liquid through a collapsible conduit or tube section 25. The tube section 25 is mounted on a backing plate 26 which is mounted in the housing 10, for example as indicated at 27. The plate 26 is provided with spaced apertures as indicated at 28, 28 to permit the hose to pass through the plate 26 and extend in a semi-circular are centered about the axis of the shaft 15. As shown in Figs. 2 and 6, the apertures 28, 28 are off-set downwardly from the main po'rtion 29 of the plate 26, for example by means of an inclined web 30, which has a central aperture 31 for receiving the shaft 15 and lock nut 23.

The impeller 21 operates to collapse the tubing 25 against the body portion 29 of the plate successively along the arcuate portion of the tubing 25 as the impeller 21 is rotated by the shaft 15. To this end, the impeller includes an axle shaft 35 mounted integrally thereon and projecting radially outward at diagonally opposite points on the shaft 15. The projecting portions of the axle 35 each mounts a roller 36 for rotation thereon. Preferably, the rollers 36 are mounted on the axle by snap washers =37, 37 seated in grooves on the axle (see Fig. 4).

By virtue of this construction, as the shaft 15 is rotated by the motor M, the rollers 36, 36 longitudinally traverse the tubing 25 collapsing it and impelling the liquid therein a similar direction. It is noted that sufiicient pressure is applied by the rollers 36 on the tubing 25 by reason of the thrust bearing 18 mounting the shaft 15. Adjustment of the pressure is accomplished by adjusting the impeller 21 axially on the shaft 15, for example by the look nuts 23, 23. i

In accordance with another feature of the invention, the tubing 25 is protected against damage by the roller 36 by means of a heavy canvas flap 41 which is secured to the mounting plates 26 as indicated at 42. Preferably, the flap 41 is of three-ply canvas construction impregnated with a suitable adhesive compound. The flap covers the tubing 25 to prevent direct contact of the rollers 36, 36 on the tubing. In addition, the flap prevents undue friction and wear between the tubing and the rollers to assist in maintaining the tubing against travel with the rollers. The canvas flap not only prevents damage to the hose but also assists in maintaining a steady pressure in the liquid being pumped. As shown in Fig. 4, the flap enlarges the collapsed area of the hose and reduces variations in the pressure caused when one roller leaves the hose at one side of the body portion 29 of the plate and the other roller engages it at the other side of the body portion 29.

Substantial durability of the pump is afforded by the construction of the tubing 25. To this end, as shown in Fig. 5, the bore of the tubing 25 is lip-shaped in cross section. By this, it is meant that the bore is generally cylindrical, but at diagonally opposite points, the walls curve outwardly into tangential relation. Thus, when the roller 36 traverses the tubing, the bore is readily collapsed to the position shown in Fig. 2, without severely distorting the wall of the tube at the point where it is bent upon itself. This particular construction of the tubing insures prolonged usage of the tubing without deterioration thereof which would normally be caused by excess distortion.

Means is also provided to securely anchor the tubing 25 to the backing plate to positively prevent the tubing from creeping around the plate as the rollers 36 traverse the tube section. To this end, the tubing 25 is formed with a radially projecting rib 45 which extends for a substantial distance along the length of the tubing. The rib 45 is adapted to fit snugly within apertures 46 and 47 in the body portion 29 and web 30 respectively of the mounting plate 26. As shown in Figs. 2 and 5, the rib 45 flares outwardly to engage against the under surface of the plate, thus preventing outward displacement of the tubing 25 from the plate. The rib 45 is compressed within the apertures 46 and 47 to effect frictional engagement of the rib with the side Walls of the apertures. The rib is cut away intermediate the apertures 46 and 47 to provide a terminus which bears against the end wall of each of the elongated apertures 46 and 47. Thus, the tubing is prevented from sliding along the plate both by the frictional engagement of the rib with the side walls of the apertures and the abutting engagement of the terminus of the rib with the end wall of the aperture. This method of anchoring the tubing to the backing plate 26 is especially effective since it is independent of extraneous fastening'means which would become dislodged from the tubing as it is flexed by the rollers 36 travelling thereover. With reference to Fig. 2, it is shown that the compression of the tubing 25 by the roller 36 even more firmly engages the sides of the rib 45 against the sides of the aperture 46.

In the operation of the pump, the liquid in the tubing 25 is advanced by the traverse of the rollers 36 over the arcuate portion of the tubing. It is noted that the angularly disposed web 30 insures that the rollers engage and disengage the tubing at points spaced 180 about the circumference of the arcuate portion at opposite sides of the aperture 31. As the shaft 15 is rotated, the rollers 36 travel alternately on the arcuately disposed portion of the hose and provide continuous pressure to force the liquid therethrough. The angularly disposed web 30 also insures that the initial compression of the conduit is gradual as the rollers travel over the upper portion of the web. Full compression of the conduit is obtained when the rollers pass the line of juncture between the main portion 29 and the web 30. Likewise, the decompression of the tube at the other side of the web is gradual. By reason of the gradual compression and decompression, the action of the pump is smoother.

In lieu of the tubing 25, tubing such as shown at 55 may be substituted. As shown in Figs. 8 and 9, the tubing 55 has a lip-shaped bore 56 similar to the bore of the tubing 25. The outline of the tubing is generally archshaped having straight sidewalls at 57, 57 and arcuate upper wall at 58. Longitudinal beads are provided at 61, 61 at the junctions of the arcuate portion 58 with the sidewalls 57. A similar bead 62 is provided at the top of the arcuate portion 58 of the arch. As shown in Fig. 9, the strai ht sidewalls 7, 57 terminate at their lower extremity in a fiat bottom bearing surface 63 having a depending rib 65 centrally thereof.

The rib 65 is adapted to fit snugly within the apertures 46 and 47 in the body portion 29 and the web 30, respectively of the mounting plate 26. As shown, the rib 65 flares outwardly to engage the undersurface of the plate, thus preventing outward displacement of the tubing 55 from the plate. The rib 65 is compressed within the apertures 46 and 47 to effect frictional engagement of the rib with the sidewalls of the apertures. .As shown in Fig. 10, the rib is cut away intermediate the apertures 46 and 47 to provide a terminus which bears against the end wall of each of the elongated apertures 46 and47. Thus, the tubing is prevented-from sliding along the plate both by the frictional engagement of the rib with the side Walls of the apertures and the abutting engagement of the terminals of the rib with the end wall of the aperture.

The beads 61, 61 and 62 eliminate the necessity for a flap such as shown at 41 in Figs. 1 to 7. As shown in Fig. 11, the rollers 36, 36 of the top bear against the upper portion of the tubing 55 and travel along the beads opposite sides of the rib 65.

formed therein. Thus, a three-point contact is provided between the rollers and the tubing. The points of contact are reinforced by reason of the beading and the tube is therefore not subject to excessive wear at points where the walls of the tubing are thin.

In addition to the additional wear resistance occasioned by the beads 61, 61 and 62, further resistance to wear is provided by the flat bottom bearing surface 63 at the As shown in Fig. 11, the bottom bearing surface 63 lies flush against the upper surface of the plate on opposite sides of the aperture. Thus, when the tubing is collapsed by the engagement of the rollers thereof, the bottom bearing surface 63 remains substantially stationary on the plate, the lateral expansion of the tubing taking place by the flaring of the straight sidewalls 57, 57. This construction of the tubing therefore eliminates rubbing of the conduit on the surface of the plate.

It is noted that the remaining structure of the pump is identical to the form shown exception of the omission of the flap 41. The pump is connected to the supply and discharge conduits by means of conventional hose fittings shown at 69 in Figs. 10 and 11, the rib 65 being cut away to afford engagement of the fitting with the tubing.

It will be apparent that the present invention affords a novel pump which is of comparatively simplified and inexpensive construction, yet is fully effective in operation and use. The liquid being pumped is confined to the tubular members 25 and 55 so that there is no possibility of foreign matter in the liquid interfering with the moving parts and clogging the working mechanism of the pump. In this way, it is possible to pump liquids having a high solid content without adversely affecting the pump mechanism.

While a particular embodiment of the present invention has been herein illustrated and described, it is not intended to limit the invention to such disclosure, and changes and modifications may be made therein and thereto without departure from the invention, as defined in the following claims.

I claim:

. l. A pump for liquids and the like, comprising a backing plate, a conduit including a resilient compressible tubular portion overlying said plate, side and end walls in said plate defining an elongated aperture in said plate underlying said tubular portion, an integral rib projecting radially from said tubular portion through said aperture, said rib being flared outwardly to engage behind said plate and being compressed between the side walls of said aperture to thereby frictionally engage said plate, said rib being coextensive with said aperture and having a terminus disposed in abutting relation with the end wall of said aperture, and roller means mounted for rotation on an axle disposed substantially parallel to said backing plate and being positioned to engage said compressible tubular portion and actuatable to longitudinally traverse said portion and compress the same to pump liquid therein.

2. A pump for liquids and the like, comprising a backing plate, a conduit including a resilient compressible tubular portion overlying said plate and having a bore of lip-shaped cross section to afford collapse of said tubular portion against said plate, side and end walls in said, plate defining an elongated aperture in said plate underlying said tubular portion, an integral rib projecting radially from said tubular portion through said aperture, said rib being flared outwardly to engage behind said plate and being compressed between the side walls of said aperture to thereby frictionally engage said plate, said rib being coextensive with said aperture and having a terminus disposed in abutting relation with the end wall of said aperture, and generally cylindrical roller means mounted for rotation on an axle disposed substantially parallel to said backing plate and being positioned to engage said in Figs. 1 to 7 with the compressible tubular portion and actuatable to longitudinally traverse said portion and compress the same to pump liquid therein.

3. A pump for liquids and the like, comprising a backing plate, a conduit including a resilient compressible tubular portion overlying said plate and having a bore of lip-shaped cross section to afford collapse of said tubular portion against said plate, side and end Walls defining an elongated aperture in said plate underlying said tubular portion, an elongated rib formed integrally with and projecting radially from said tubular portion through said aperture, said rib being flared outwardly to engage behind said plate and being compressed between the side walls of said aperture to thereby frictionally engage said plate, said rib being coextensive with said aperture and having a terminus disposed in abutting relation with the end wall of said aperture, roller means mounted for rotation on an axle disposed substantially parallel to said backing plate and being positioned to engage said compressible tubular portion and actuatable to longitudinally traverse said portion and compress the same to pump liquid therein, and a flexible flap mounted on said backing plate and positioned intermediate said flexible portion and said roller means to prevent direct contact of the roller means with the flexible portion.

4. A pump for liquids and the like, comprising a backing plate, a shaft mounted for rotation about an axis substantially perpendicular to said backing plate, a conduit including a resilient compressible tubular portion overlying said plate and disposed in a semi-circular arc coaxial with said shaft, said tubular portion having a bore of lip-shaped cross section to afford collapse of said tubular portion against said plate, side and end walls defining an elongated aperture in said plate underlying said tubular portion, an elongated rib formed integrally with and projecting radially from said tubular portion through said aperture, said rib being flared outwardly to engage behind said plate and being compressed between the side walls of said aperture to thereby frictionally engage said plate, said rib being coextensive with said aperture and having a terminus disposed in abutting relation with the end wall of said aperture, an impeller carried by said shaft and comprising rollers mounted for rotation on an axle disposed radially to said shaft and parallel to said backing plate, said rollers being positioned to alternately engage said compressible tubular portion and actuatable by rotation of the shaft to alternately longitudinally traverse said portion and pump liquid therein, and a flexible flap mounted on said backing plate and positioned intermediate said flexible portion and said rollers to prevent direct contact of the rollers on the flexible portion.

5. A device according to claim 4 wherein said shaft is threaded, and including lock nuts on said threaded por tion engaging said impeller on opposite sides thereof, said lock nuts being adjustable to position the impeller axially of said shaft.

6. A device according to claim 4 wherein said backing plate comprises a body portion underlying the semicircular arc of said tubular portion, means defining apertures in said backing plate spaced apart from said body portion and adapted to receive the tubular portion, and an inclined web mounting said aperture-defining means on said body portion to offset said tube-receiving apertures downwardly from said body portion, said conduit being disposed on said inclined web at an acute angle to the plane of rotation of said rollers thereby to effect a gradual engagement and compression of said conduit inadvance of the traverse of the rollers on said semicircular tubular portion of the conduit.

7. A pump for liquids and the like comprising a backing plate, a conduit including a resilient compressible tubular portion overlying said plate, side and end walls defining an elongated aperture in said plate underlying said tubular portion, an integral rib projecting radially from said tubular portion through said aperture, said rib being flared outwardly to engage behind said plate and having a terminus disposed in abutting relation with the end wall of said aperture, and roller means mounted for rotation on an axle disposed substantially parallel to said backing plate and being positioned to engage said compressible tubular portion and actuatable to longitudinally traverse said portion and compress the same to pump liquid therein.

8. A pump according to claim 7 wherein said rib is coextensive with said aperture.

9. A pump according to claim 7 wherein said tubular portion has a bore of lip-shaped cross section operable to be collapsed upon compression of said tubular portion by said roller means.

10. A pump according to claim 7 wherein .said tubular portion comprises a member having an arch-shaped outline and having a flat bottom bearing surface engaging flush against said backing plate adjacent said aperture, and wherein further said rib projects centrally from said bottom bearing surface through said aperture.

11. A pump according to claim 10 wherein said archshaped outline is defined by substantially straight side Walls terminating at their upper extremity in an arcuate top wall, said tubular member being provided with longitudinal beads extending therealong at the upper terminus of each of said sidewalls and a longitudinal bead extending along said arcuate top wall centrally thereof whereby upon compression of said tubular portion by said rollers said rollers engage said tubular member along said beads.

12. A pump for liquids and the like, comprising a shaft mounted for rotation about its axis, a conduit including a resilient compressible tubular portion disposed in a semi-circular arc coaxial with said shaft, said tubular portion having a bore of lip-shaped cross-section, a support for said compressible tubular portion, side and end walls in said support defining an elongated aperture in registry with said tubular portion, an elongated rib formed integrally with and projecting radially from said tubular portion through said aperture and flared outwardly to engage behind said support to mount said portion in engagement with said support, said rib being compressed between the side walls of the aperture to thereby frictionally engage said support, said rib being coextensive with said aperture and having a terminus disposed in abutting relation with the end wall of the aperture, and roller means mounted on said shaft positioned to alternately engage said compressible tubular portion and actuatable by rotation of the shaft to alternately longitudL nally traverse said portion and compress the same against said support to pump liquid therein.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3128716 *Jul 17, 1961Apr 14, 1964Beckman Instruments IncPeristaltic pump
US3192863 *Mar 14, 1962Jul 6, 1965Grenobloise Etude ApplBlood pump
US4080113 *Dec 22, 1976Mar 21, 1978Societe Anonyme Dite: DelascoDeformable flexible tube constituting the body of a peristaltic pump
US4201525 *Jul 5, 1978May 6, 1980Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc.Peristaltic pump
US4333088 *Nov 3, 1980Jun 1, 1982Exxon Research & Engineering Co.Disposable peristaltic pump assembly for facsimile printer
US4359744 *Nov 3, 1980Nov 16, 1982Exxon Research And Engineering Co.Ink jet printer with peristaltic pump
US4376283 *Nov 3, 1980Mar 8, 1983Exxon Research And Engineering Co.Method and apparatus for using a disposable ink jet assembly in a facsimile system and the like
US4453169 *Apr 7, 1982Jun 5, 1984Exxon Research And Engineering Co.Ink jet apparatus and method
US4730993 *May 22, 1986Mar 15, 1988Daiichi Engineering Co., Ltd.Squeeze pump
US4846637 *Jul 14, 1988Jul 11, 1989Alderson Richard KInfusion pump system and conduit therefor
US4923375 *Mar 1, 1989May 8, 1990Ejlersen Henning MHose pump, in particular an insulin pump
US4936760 *Jun 12, 1989Jun 26, 1990Williams David RVolumetric infusion pump
US5533878 *Mar 2, 1995Jul 9, 1996Daiichi Techno Co., Ltd.Squeeze type pump
US6599106 *Feb 15, 2001Jul 29, 2003Seiko Epson CorporationTube pump and ink jet recording apparatus incorporating the same
US8500421 *Dec 31, 2006Aug 6, 2013Novartis AgSystem and method operable to prevent tubing displacement within a peristaltic pump
EP0075020A1 *Dec 3, 1981Mar 30, 1983Daiichi Engineering Co. Ltd.Squeeze pump
EP0388596A1 *Jan 28, 1990Sep 26, 1990B. Braun Melsungen AGPump tube for a peristaltic pump
Classifications
U.S. Classification417/477.5, 417/477.12
International ClassificationF04B43/12
Cooperative ClassificationF04B43/1269
European ClassificationF04B43/12G4