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Publication numberUS2918062 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 22, 1959
Filing dateJul 30, 1958
Priority dateJul 30, 1958
Publication numberUS 2918062 A, US 2918062A, US-A-2918062, US2918062 A, US2918062A
InventorsScholl William M
Original AssigneeScholl William M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Medicinal plaster or bandage
US 2918062 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 22, 1959 w- M, SCHQLL 2,918,062

MEDICIN'AL PLASTER 0R BANDAGE Filed July :50, 1958 LFE.' afar' W/l//am M. lSalza/ United States Patent O MEDICINAL PLASTER OR BANDAGE William M. Scholl, Chicago, lll.

Application July 30, 1958, Serial No. 752,058

8 Claims. (Cl. 12S-153) This invention relates to improvements in a medicinal or surgical plaster or bandage and is particularly desirable as a digital bandage for application to a linger or toe to alleviate afliictions of the general character of excrescences, corns, calluses, warts, as well as other afflictions such as cuts or abrasions, although the device will have other uses and purposes as will be apparent to one skilled in the art.

In the past, many and various types of plasters or bandages of the pressure-relieving type have been developed, but in many cases these bandages while capable of transferring the pressure of an article of apparel or the like to healthy tissue surrounding an affliction, were of such construction that the pressure-eliminating portion of the plaster or bandage itself caused some irritation. In other cases, these bandages if the pressure-relieving portion had a cavity or aperture to receive an affliction, were of such construction that a medicament placed over the afliiction would not be in sufficiently close proximity to the affliction, and frequently such items were of such construction that a sudden application of pressure directly over the afiction was not cushioned or rendered at least partially ineffectual by the plaster itself. In other instances, these formerly known bandages did not fit a particular portion of the body, such as a digit, with an effective nicety, but would overlap a digit and extend sidewise to an extent that the bandage would cause irritation to, or possibly be disrupted by adjacent digits.

With the foregoing in mind, -it is an important object of the instant invention to provide a digital plaster or bandage in which the pressure-relieving portion of the device is provided with opposed edges substantially paralleling the side edges of the digit to which the bandage is applied.

vAnother object of the instant invention resides in the provision of a medical or surgical plaster or bandage having a body part or pad of cushioning material with an affliction-receiving cavity therein, and with a medicated plug or tab in the cavity and also providing a cushioning action.

A further feature of the invention resides in the provision of a plaster or bandage having a pressure-relieving portion of cushioning material with an aiiiiction-receiving cavity therein, in which cavity is disposed a medicated tab in such manner and of such construction as to bring the medication into close proximity with the afliiction itself.

Still another object of the instant invention is the provision of a plaster or bandage incorporating a pressurerelieving pad having an affliction-receiving cavity therein, and a medicated tab of napped fabric disposed in the cavity in such manner that the napping on the tab functions as a shock-absorbing medium against sudden pressures applied directly over the ailliction.

While some of the more salient features, characteristics and advantages of the instant invention have been above pointed out, others will become apparent from the fol- Patented Dec. a2, 195e ICC lowing disclosures, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing, in which: v

Fig. 1 is a plan view of a plaster or bandage embodying principles of the instant invention;

Fig. 2 is a bottom plan view of the structure of Fig. l;

Fig. 3 is a longitudinal vertical sectional view taken substantially as indicated by the line III-III of Fig. 1, looking in the direction of the arrows; and

Fig. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical sectional view of the character of Fig. 3, but showing a slightly different form of construction.

As shown on the drawings:

The illustrated embodiments of the instant invention are purposely shown enlarged beyond their most usual size for purposes of clarity. It Will be understood that in actual manufacture the bandage or plaster may be made of any desirable size, but in most instances will be made exceedingly smaller than the illustrations, so as to adequately lit around a digit such as a toe or linger.

The first illustrated embodiment of the instant invention, seen in Figs. l, 2 and 3, includes an attaching strip 1 which is relatively narrow in its end portions, but which is preferably provided with an enlarged intermediate portion as indicated at 2. Throughout its entire length, this strip is preferably provided on its under face with a pressure-sensitive adhesive spread 3. This attaching -strip may be made of any suitable material but is preferably made of a waterproof material and is imperforate throughout. By way of example, the strip could be a thermoplastic film, a thin plastic-coated fabric, or the equivalent. It is preferably of a length to wrap entirely around a digit with the ends slightly overlapped.

Secured by the adhesive under surface 3 to the under side of the enlarged portion 2 of the strip 1 is a pressureeliminating pad or body part 4. This may be made of any suitable cushioning material such'A as felt, foam latex, thermoplastic or chemical foam, or theequivalent. As seen best in Fig. 2, the forward and reari edges of the pad 4 are preferably arcuate or curvate as indicated at 5, while the opposed side edges of the pad are preferably straight, as indicated at 6 6, these side edges therefore substantially paralleling the sides of a digit such as a finger or toe. The pad 4 itself may lie directly upon the digit but will not project beyond the digit in a manner to cause spacing between digits, irritation to an adjacent digit, or disruption or loosening of the pad by contact with an adjacent digit, as would be the case if the pad were completely circular. The pad is preferably provided with an affliction-receiving cavity 7 therein which may be of any suitable size or shape, but which in the illustrated instance is shown in the form of an aperture, and the pad is of sutlcient thickness that an afliiction such as a corn or the like may be received within the cavity 7 and the pressure of an article of apparel transferred to adjacent surrounding healthy tissue. On its under face, the pad is also preferably provided with 'a spread of pressure-sensitive adhesive as seen at 8 in Fig. 3, to better insure the pad remaining in its desired position during use.

As seen best in Fig. 1, the marginal portions of the pad 4 adjacent the rounded edges 5-5 thereof preferably project beyond the enlarged portion 2 of the strip 1. This facilitates proper positioning of the pad on the body of a user.

In order to relieve and aid in the cure of the particular aiiction, a medicated plug or tab is preferably disposed in the raffliction-receiving cavity of the pad 4 in position to overlie the alictin itself. This tab or plug may be held in position by the adhesive under surface of the attaching strip 1, or it may be held in position by friction alone. As seen best in Fig. 3, the plug or tab comprises a fabric sheet 9 which is napped on one side as indicated zit-10, Aand preferably this napping is rela-y tively heavy. In this particular embodiment of the invention, the napped side ofthe fabric is disposed uppermost, and on the smooth under side of the fabric a ,suitable medicament 11 Vis provided. AWhile in the yillustrated showing the medicament is in the' nature of a spread on the under side ofthe tab in order to facilitate illustration, it will be understoodathat the pad might be impregnated with someisuitable medication, if 'so desired. Further, it should-be noted that the medicated tab is thinner o'r of less thickness than the cushioning pad 4 so as to leave space inthe cavity 7 for reception of the aliction. The structure of the medicated tab brings the medicament in closer proximity to, or in contact with the affliction, whereby full benefit of the medicament may be acquired. In addition,`it will be noted` that the napping on the fabric tab will provide a cushioning 4effect and act as a shock absorber if through inadvertence times, in the past with previously constructed plasters or bandages, irritation of the aiiction was caused by wearing apparel forcing the cover or attaching strip inwardly in the region o'f the afliiction-receiving cavity, so that there was a disagreeable amount of rubbing on the affliction itself. Such irritation or rubbing with the instant invention will be eliminated by virtue of the yielding character of the napping on the medicated tab.

In Fig. 4 I have illustrated a slightly different arrangement, wherein the general structure is the same as above described. 4In this instance, however, the medicated tab is reversed in position, with the fabric portion 9 uppermost, and the napping 10 depending therefrom, the medicament 11 being applied to the napping 10 rather than to the smooth side of the fabric. This may be more desirable in connection with certain types of afllictions.

In use, the instant invention may be easily and quickly applied to a digit over an aiiction. Assuming'a corn to be the cause of trouble, it is a simple expedient to place the plaster or bandage sothat the corn is directly beneath the medicated tab within the 'cavity 7, and wrap the end portions of the attaching strip 1 around the toe. The waterproof nature of the attaching strip permits the user to bathe the foot and leave the plaster or bandage in position. i

From the foregoing, it is apparent that I have provided a simple fo'rmvof plaster or bandage for digits of the pressure-relieving type, which not only fits `the digit in a neat and effective manner, transfers pressure to healthy tissue around an affliction, but also brings medicament closer to the affliction and renders a shock-absorbing service against blows or pressure applied directly over the afiction, to a considerably 'greater extent than was possible with similar appliances made heretofore. Obviously, the instant invention with its improved features may be very economically manufactured, and is extremely durable.

It will be understood that modifications and variations may be effected without departing from the scope of the novel concepts of the present invention.

I claim as my invention:

1. In a surgical bandage, a body part of cushioning material having curvate front and rear edges and straight opening therein, a relatively narrow attaching strip having a widened intermediate portion to overlie said body part and carrying a pressure sensitive adhesive under surface, and a napped soft fabric plug thinner than said body part and carrying a medicament on its under surface attached to said attaching strip inside said opening.

2. In a surgical bandage, a body part of cushioning material having curvate front and rear edges and straight side edges to parallel a digit, said body part having an opening therein, a relatively narrow attaching strip having a widened intermediate portion to overlie said body part and carrying a pressure sensitive adhesive under surface, and a napped soft fabric plug thinner than said body part and carrying a medicament on its under surface attached to said attaching strip inside said opening, said body part also carrying a pressure sensitive adhesive on its under surface and projecting beyond the widened portion of said attaching strip at the margins adjacent `the curvate edges.

3. In a surgical bandage, an attaching strip, a pad of cushioning material on said strip, said pad having an opening therein, and a medicated tab of less thickness than said pad in said opening and comprising a napped fabric.

4. In a medicinal plaster or bandage, a relatively thick padv of cushioning material having an opening therein to receive an affliction, means to attach said pad to the body of a user, and a tab thinner than said pad compris- Ving a napped fabric carrying medicament on the lower face thereof and disposed in said opening.

5. Ina medicinal plaster or bandage, a pad of cushioning material having a cavity therein to receive an aiiction, means to attach said pad to the body of a user, and a tab of napped fabric thinner than said pad in said .cavity and carrying a medicament exposed on the under surface of said tab.

6. In a medicinal plaster or bandage, a pad of cushioning material having a cavity therein to receive an aiiction, means to attach said pad to the body of a user, and a tab of napped fabric thinner than said pad and disposed in said cavity with the napped side uppermost, said tab carrying a medicament exposed to the afliction on the opposite side of said tab.

7. In a medicinal plaster or bandage, a pad of cushioning material having a cavity therein to receive an affliction, means to attach said pad to the body of a user, and a tab of napped fabric thinner than said pad and disposed` in said cavity with the unnapped side of the fabric uppermost, said tab carrying a medicament on the napped lower lside thereof to contact the atiliction.

8. In a medicinal plaster or bandage, an elongated thin waterproof attaching strip carrying pressure sensitive adhesive on'its under face, a pad of cushioning material having an affliction receiving cavity therein and an adhesive under face carried by said strip, and a fabric tab heavily napped on the upper side in said cavity against the adhesive on said strip to koverlie the affliction received in said cavity, said tab being thinner than said pad and carrying a' medicament exposed on its under surface.

N0 references cited.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3092103 *Nov 13, 1959Jun 4, 1963Lester Mower RobertEye patch
US3191824 *Nov 26, 1962Jun 29, 1965Frances Burr BessieContact thimble device
US4687476 *Jul 11, 1984Aug 18, 1987Eric PailinTopical dressings
US5899207 *Mar 16, 1998May 4, 1999The Seaberg Company, Inc.Protecting skin from friction
US6067987 *Mar 16, 1999May 30, 2000The Seaberg Company, Inc.Protecting skin and other tissues from friction
US7087806Sep 25, 2003Aug 8, 2006Advanced Wound Systems, LlcFriction reducing devices
US7249385 *Sep 20, 2004Jul 31, 2007Richard SchukraftFinger/toe tip protective apparatus
US7479577Aug 8, 2006Jan 20, 2009Advanced Wound Systems, LlcFriction reducing devices
US20120136313 *Nov 10, 2010May 31, 2012Smith Joseph OAnatomically engineered configured article
WO1985000287A1 *Jul 11, 1984Jan 31, 1985Harlands Of Hull LtdTopical dressings
Classifications
U.S. Classification128/894
International ClassificationA61F13/10, A61F13/06, A61F13/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61F13/02, A61F13/105, A61F13/063
European ClassificationA61F13/10H2, A61F13/06C, A61F13/02