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Publication numberUS2918186 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 22, 1959
Filing dateFeb 24, 1958
Priority dateFeb 24, 1958
Publication numberUS 2918186 A, US 2918186A, US-A-2918186, US2918186 A, US2918186A
InventorsCirillo Lee
Original AssigneeTowmotor Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lift truck roll-off
US 2918186 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 22, 1959 L. CIRILLO LIFT TRUCK ROLL-OFF 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Feb. 24, 1958 INVENTOR. 456' 672/440 Dec. 22, 1959 L. CIRILLO 2,918,186

LIFT TRUCK ROLL-OFF Filed Feb. 24, 1958 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.

(6 C/rQ/ZZO 9 L. CIRILLO LIFT TRUCK ROLL-OFF Filed Feb. 24. 1958 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR.

[5 eve/.440

$0.4M Magn/zxs Dec. 22, 1959 L. CIRILLO 2,918,186

LIFT TRUCK ROLL-OFF Filed Feb. 24, 1958 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR 16E C/e/ldo ,4 roe/Mfrs LIFT TRUCK RGLL-OFF Lee Cirillo, Cleveland, Ohio, assignor to Towmotor Corporation, Cleveland, Ohio, a corporation of Ohio Application February 24, 1958, Serial No. 717,172

2 Claims. (Cl. 214-512) ,This invention relates to .an industrial .lift truck and more particularly to a lift truck having a novel load liftingand maneuvering apparatus forming a part thereof.

.Itis an object of this invention to facilitatehandling andtransfer of elongated load articles such as-bundles of lumber stacked side .by side along an aisle of a warehouse or other storage space, for example. According to: this invention, provisionis made for lifting, supporting and translating such articles by fork tines either of which may be positioned anywhere in a range extending from a location laterally beyond the Width of the truck body and carriage frame to a location Well within the width of either. As a further object and feature of the invention, prvision is made for translating such a load laterally aiong'the truck carriage while support .is maintained at a .fixe'djlocation for the articles at any point within the range of lateral positions ofthe fork tines.

This invention has particularapplication inhandling and movement of relativelylong articles or groups of articles such as bundles of lumber which are stored or to be stored in bins orpiles having accessible ends terminating alongan aisle in a-line or vertical plane. In the removal of one .of .such bundles from between similar bundles with an industrial lift truck as heretofore provided, it is necessary to align the truck with the longi tudinal axis of the bundle and to lift and withdraw the bundle from said line or plane to an extent permitting placing the fork transversely beneath atleast a portion of .the pile by repositioning of the truck and fork longitudinally along the aisle. Thereafter, the bundle may be lifted somewhat and rolled onto the fork to a central balanced position by a'roller .along each of the tines of the fork. It has been possible to laterally spread the fork tines to the width of the truck to increase the efiectiveness thereof.

Although industrial lift trucks according to the prior art have been effective to a large degree in facilitating handlingiof bundles of material as described, the same were deficient in being unable to pick up a load from one bin among a large number of bins having similar bundles terminating along a line or vertical plane without first disposing the truck transversely of the aisle and in alignment with the load, elevating the bundle and extending it beyond the line into the aisle to enable disposition of the truck fork transversely beneath the end of the bundle for further manipulation thereof. In cases of relatively narrow aisles, this procedure becomes difficult and problematical.

According to this invention movement of bundles of elongated articles is greatly improved by fork tines individually extendable in either lateral direction and being laterally extendable beyond the width of the truck body or carriage. Each time is provided with a roller extending along the length thereof for rolling the bundle centrally on the fork. Alignment of the truck with the bundle is obviated inmost cases since the truck incorporating fork tines extendable beyond the width of the truck body and carriage according to this invention may,

while transversely positioned with respect to a bundle and in an aisle adjacent thereto, extend a fork tine beneath the bundle, roll the bundle centrally onto the fork and move away with the same. In the even-t that a load is unusually long and positioned between closely spaced stacks, it may be preliminarily lifted and withdrawn sufficiently to allow a repositioning of the truck to a location somewhat removed from the stack, without at any time positioning the truck transversely of the aisle. In addition, by virtue of the laterally movable fork tines, a load on the fork may be lifted and moved along its longitudinal axis and laterally on the truck by a unitary lateral movement of the fork tines so as to clear other bundles while being moved away.

.It is an object of this invention to provide an industrial lift truck incorporating novel fork manipulating means facilitating improved handling of loads of elongated material.

It is another object of this invention to provide an apparatus and method for handling elongated bundles of material with an industrial lift truck that obviates the necessity for positioning the truck in alignment with the bundle for projecting the bundle beyond like adjacent bundles prior to loading the bundle on the trucks fork.

It is another object of this invention to provide an industrial lift truck with fork tines with roll-off assemblies extendable laterally beyond the respective sides of the truck.

It is another object of this invention to provide an industrial lift truck according to the last preceding object, with fork tines individually movable laterally in either of two directions.

It is another object of this invention to provide an industrial lift truck according to the last preceding object with a roller extending longitudinally along each of the fork tines and being drivingly rotatable in either direction.

Other and further objects and advantages of this invention will become apparent from a detailed description of the invention taken with the accompanying drawings in which:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of an industrial lift truck made according to the present invention;

Figure 2 is aside elevational view of the carriage and lift fork assembly .of this invention;

Figure 3 is a perspective view, with parts removed, of the lift fork frame assembly of this invention;

Figure 4 is a rear view of the lift fork frame assembly showing fork supports and fork extension piston-cylinder combinations forming a part of the invention;

Figure 5 is a front elevational view of the lift fork frame showing the fork tines in extended positions;

Figure 6 is a front elevational view of the lift fork frame showing the fork tines in retracted positions; and

Figure 7 is a schematic diagram of a hydraulic system for power elements of the invention.

In the drawings, 10 represents generally the industrial truck to which the present invention is applicable including a body 12 for housing a suitable motor and related equipment for propelling the truck about and operating the lift fork assembly as hereinafter described. The truck .motor is coupled to a pair of drive wheels, one of which is shown at -14 and a pair of dirigible wheels, one of which is shown at is, manipulable by the truck operator through a steering wheel 18 and suitable interconnecting linkage (not shown) is provided. A seat 19 is provided for the truck operator from which the steering wheel 18 and the carriage hoist, fork tine, and roller motor controls 20, 21, 22 and 23, respectively, are within easy reach and a lift fork assembly shown generally at 24 is mounted on the forward end of the truck for handling loads of material as hereinbelow described,

For elevating or lowering loads fork assembly 24 is movable in a generally vertical direction along a mast 26 by suitable hydraulic or otherpower means acting through a pair of chains 28 and 30, secured atrespective ends to the fork assembly and to the power means and being engageable with respective sprockets 32 and 34 mounted in mast 26 near the top thereof.

The fork assembly 24 includes a vertically disposed frame 40 to accommodate a pair of hydraulic pistoncylinder combination units 42 and 44 shown more clearly in Figure 4, for laterally positioning either of a pair of fork tines shown generally at 46 and 48 along the frame 40. Frame 40 has a pair of apertured lugs fixed thereto, one of which is shown more clearly at 50 in Figure 2. These lugs are secured to a guide plate 51 extending along the rear of the carriage and having the chains 28 and 30 attached thereto for facilitating elevation and lowering of the entire fork assembly as a unit.

For engaging and supporting a load forwardly of the truck, fork tines 46 and 48 extend forwardly of the frame 40 and are integral with respective base portions 52 and 54 secured to respective weldments 56 and 58. Weldments 56 and 58 in turn are secured to pairs of shafts 60, 62, 64, 66 by bars 61, 63 and 65, 67 slidable along pairs of spaced, parallel, tubular guides 68, 70 and 72, 74 mounted horizontally in frame 40. Lateral movement of each tine is effected by applying a laterally directed force thereto in either direction by a piston-cylinder unit through brackets 76 and 78 connected to the heads of respective pistons of these units and to the respective weldments. A pair of pins 80 and 82 extend through coaxial apertures near the end of respective brackets and aligned apertures near the ends respective pistons. Since each cylinder of each pistoncylinder unit is fixed to frame 40, application of hydraulic fluid under pressure to the head or rod end of the cylinder is effective to extend the piston and accordingly, the fork tine concerned.

To accommodate movement of the tines inwardly within the width of frame 40, slots 84, 86 and 88 are provided in the forward side and at one end of frame 40 to'accommodate bars 61 and 63 and bracket 76 and slots 90, 92 and 94 are provided in the forward side and at the other end of frame 40 to accommodate bars 65 and 67 and bracket 78.

As observed in Figure 4 guides 68, 70, 72 and 74 extend along portions of the lateral extent of frame 40 and that shafts 60, 62, 64 and 66 are considerably longer than the guides in which they are slidable whereby each tine is extendable to a considerable distance beyond the width of frame 40 without loss of support. Frame 40, guides 68, 70, 72 and 74 and shafts 60, 62, 64 and 66 are sized and proportioned to support a heavy load having a relatively large moment at the extreme lateral position of the tine.

To effect lateral positioning of either tine 46 or 48 a hydraulic fluid pump (not shown) supplies hydraulic fluid under pressure to the cylinders of units 42 and 44 under the control of a manually actuable valve having a control lever at 22. Such fluid may be conducted from the control valve through either of lines 96 or 98 to either the rod or head end of the cylinder of unit 42 to laterally move tine 46 and may be conducted from the control valve through either of lines 100 or 102 to either the rod or head end of the cylinder of unit 44 to laterally move tine 48. Such application of fluid to the cylinders through either of the two lines provided for each cylinder is completely independent of application of fluid to the other cylinder through either of the lines provided whereby the tines are independent of each other in lateral movement.

Tines 46 and 48 of the fork assembly are provided with respective enclosures shown broken away at 112 and 114 and extending along the forwardly protruding portions and upright base portions. Each enclosure is 4 secured by a strap as shown at 116 in Figure 2 adapted to extend beneath the forward end of the tine and rollers 118 and 120 extend along and are rotatably mounted on the enclosures. Each of the upright portions of the enclosures are secured to upright portions of the tines by spaced, apertured lugs as at 113 and for receiving a pin 121 extending through the lugs and mating tubular shafts as at 117 and 119 secured as by welding to the upright base portions of the tines. Spaced, apertured lugs as at 122, 124, and 126 are secured to the sides of the enclosures and receive respective roller axles as the axle shown at 128 for rotatably supporting each roller.

For engaging and supporting the bottom planar surface of a load carried by the truck fork, rollers 118 and are disposed and mounted with their uppermost curved surfaces above the uppermost surface of the corresponding tine enclosures 112 and 114 whereby the load will clear these enclosures and may be translated laterally of the fork by rotation of the rollers.

For effecting rotation of the rollers a pair of motors are provided in housings 130 and 132 mounted at the top of each fork tine enclosure and chains such as chain 134 are provided for drivingly coupling the motor shafts to the rollers through the sprockets as shown at 136 and 138 connected to the motor shaft and roller, respectively. The chains are preferably enclosed in the vertical portions of the tine enclosures for safety and to keep the same as clean as possible.

The piston-cylinder combination units of the invention may be independently operable under control of the truck operator whereby hydraulic fluid is selectively applicable to either rod or head end of either, accordingly, either of the fork tines may be extendible in either direction for greater control of the fork load.

According to this invention, the necessity of great aisle width is avoided whereby an elongated bundle may be removed from or placed in a space adjacent to stacked bundles on each side thereof by a truck disposed longitudinally along an aisle along which the ends of the bundles are disposed. The truck is positioned so that the carriage is adjacent to the bundle and the fork tine adjacent to the bundle is extended laterally beyond the width of the fork frame and beneath the bundle. The bundle is elevated from its supports by one tine of the fork and is drawn into the aisle and on the fork tines by rotation of the roller or rollers beneath the bundle. The rollers may be driven until the bundle assumes a central balanced position on the forks with respective ends of the bundle substantially equidistantly overhanging the two fork tines.

In the balanced position, the subject bundle may protrude somewhat into the space it occupied between adjacent bundles. To clear these adjacent bundles to facilitate transporting the subject bundle, it may be translated further into the aisle by a simultaneous lateral movement of the fork tines after which the truck and load may be driven away.

As shown in Figures 5 and 6, the tines of the forks are positionable at any point of a wide range. In Figure 5 the tines are at their outer extremities in which position a broad base is provided for a load and in Figure 6 the tines are fully retracted as may be provided for narrower loads.

As shown in Figure 7 of the drawings, a hydraulic system under the control of the truck operator is provided for effecting either translation of the fork tines, rotation of the tine rollers or elevation of the carriage. The various power elements of the system are controlled by a valve having actuating control arms 20, 21, 22 and 23 manipulable by the truck operator and shown in Figure l.

The truck carriage is elevated by a piston-cylinder combination 140 receiving hydraulic fluid from a pump 142 under the control of a single-acting valve 144 actuated by arm 20, piston-cylinder units 42 and 44 receive fluid from pump 142 under the control of respective two-way valves 146 and 148 and roller motors 150 and 152 disposed in housings 130 and 132 receive fluid from the pump under the control of two-way valve 154. Under circumstances wherein no fluid from the output of pump 142 is utilized, the pump may be relieved by a relief valve 143 communicating with the pump outlet and a sump 156 for circulating the fluid when it exceeds a predetermined pressure.

Pump 142 receives fluid from sump 156 and delivers the fluid under high pressure to each of the valves 144, 146, 148 and 154 through lines 158, 160, 162 and 164, respectively. The valves include oscillatable members 166, 168, 170 and 172, respectively, each having an arcuate channel or a pair of oppositely disposed arcuate channels subtending quadrants of the members for accommodating fluid flow to the fluid-powered components. A return line 174 is provided with branch connections communicating with the valves 146, 148 and 154 at points diametrically opposed from the pressure lines, and a line 175 communicates with valve 144 for fluid return to sump 156.

The bottom end of the cylinder of unit 140 communicates with valve 144 through a line 176 at a point intermediate to pressure line 158 and return line 175 and 90 displaced with respect to each of these lines, whereby by the angular disposition of member 166, either the pressure line 158 or return line 175 is placed in communication with line 176 through arcuate channel 165 in member 166. Accordingly, in a position of member 166 as shown in Figure 7 of the drawings, application of fluid under pressure through line 158, channel 165 and line 176 is effective to elevate the truck carriage and in a position of member 166 displaced 90 counterclockwise from the position shown in Figure 7 of the drawings, communication is established between the cylinder of unit 140 and sump 156 through line 176, channel 165 and line 175 whereby the carriage is lowered by its own weight and fluid in the cylinder is forced back into the sump.

Under the control of valves 146 and 148 high pressure fluid may be applied to either end of either of the cylinders of units 42 and 44 while the remaining end of the cylinder is exhausted to the sump. Valve member 168 is provided with arcuate channels 176 and 177 subtending quadrants of member 168 for selectively providing communication between the high pressure branch line 162 and either of lines 98 or 96 leading from the valve opposite ends of the cylinder of unit 42 while establishing communication between the other of the lines 98 or 96 and return line 174.

Piston-cylinder unit 44 has opposite ends of its cylinder in communication with diametrically opposed portions of valve 148 through lines 100 and 102 and high pressure line 160 and return line 174 are mutually diametrically disposed and displaced by a quadrant from lines 100 and 102 at the valve 148. The oscillatable member 170 of valve 148 is provided with arcuate chan' nels 188 and 190 subtending diametrically opposed quadrants and this member is positionable to establish communication between high pressure line 160 and either of lines 184 or 186 through one of the arcuate channels 188 or 190 while simultaneously establishing communication between the other line through the other arcuate channels to the sump 156.

Accordingly, valves 146 and 148 are adapted by mere positioning of oscillatable members 168 or 170 to extend or retract either of the fork tines under the influence of the associated piston-cylinder unit 42 or 44. Arms 21 and 22 are coupled to the oscillatable members 168 and 170, respectively, whereby the valves are readily actuable by the truck operator.

The rollers 118 and 120 of the truck are adapted to be driven by reversible fluid motors 150 and 152 con nected in a parallel hydraulic circuit arrangement and receiving fluid under the control of valve 154. High pressure and sump lines 164 and 174 are in communication with valve 154 at diametrically opposed points and a pair of lines 196 and 198 at mutually diametrically opposed points and displaced from the pump and sump lines 164 and 174 establish communication between the valve and respective sides of each of the motors. The oscillatable member 172 of valve 154 is provided with arcuate channels 200 and 202 subtending quadrants of the member and being diametrically opposed. The member 172 is positionable to establish communication between either side of the motors and the high pressure line while simultaneously establishing communication between the return line and the other sides of the motors. The member 172 is coupled to control arm 23 whereby the truck operator may readily and easily effect rotation of the rollers in either direction.

Having thus described this invention in such full, clear, concise and exact terms as to enable any person skilled in the art to which it pertains to make and use the same, and having set forth the best mode contemplated of carrying out this invention, I state that the subject matter which I regard as being my invention is particularly pointed out and distinctly claimed in what is claimed, it being understood that equivalents or modifications of, or substitutions for, parts of the above specifically described embodiment of the invention may be made without departing from the scope of the invention as set forth in what is claimed.

What is claimed is:

1. Apparatus for loading and unloading an elongated load in combination with a lift fork truck, said truck having a hoisting mast, a carriage mounted for vertical reciprocation on the mast, said carriage having a pair of vertically spaced horizontal guideways at one side thereof, a pair of spaced horizontal members mounted for movement in said guideways, a lifting fork member mounted on the outer end of said members, hydraulic cylinder means to project said members and the fork carried thereby laterally of the carriage, a second pair of spaced horizontal guideways at the other side of said carriage, a second pair of horizontal members mounted for reciprocation in said second pair of guideways, a second fork mounted at the outer end of said second pair of members and adapted to be carried laterally of the carriage by said members, a second hydraulic cylinder means for moving said second pair of members and said second fork transversely of the carriage, said first-named fork having horizontal roller means generally parallel to the fork and carried thereby, said first-named fork having hydraulic motor means to rotate said roller means, said second fork having roller means carried thereby generally parallel to the fork, said second fork having hydraulic motor means to rotate said roller means carried by said second fork, hydraulic pump means carried by the lift truck, conduit and valve means connecting said pump and said hydraulic cylinder means to selectively move said first and second forks relative to the carriage, valve and conduit means connecting said pump to said hydraulic motor means to rotate said roller means.

2. Apparatus for loading and unloading an elongated load in combination with a lift fork truck, said truck having a hoisting mast, a carriage mounted for vertical reciprocation on the mast, said carriage having a pair of spaced horizontal members mounted for movement transversely of the carriage, a lifting fork member mounted on the outer end of said members, hydraulic cylinder means to reciprocate said members and the fork carried thereby laterally of the carriage, a second pair of hori zontal members mounted for reciprocation transversely of said carriage, a second fork mounted at the outer end of said second pair of members and adapted to be carried laterally of the carriage by said members, a second hydraulic means for moving said second fork trans- "7 versely of the carriage, said first-named fork having horizontal roller means generally parallel to the fork and carried thereby, said first-named fork having hydraulic motor means to rotate said roller means, said second fork having roller means carried thereby generally parallel to the fork, said second fork having hydraulic motor means to rotate said roller means carried by said second fork, hydraulic pump means carried by the lift truck, first conduit and valve means connecting said pump and said first hydraulic cylinder means to selectively move said first fork relative to the carriage, second valve and con- 5 tate said roller means.

8 duit means connecting said pump to said second hydraulic cylinder means to selectively move said second fork relative to the carriage, and third valve and conduit means connecting said pump to said roller means to ro- References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Weaver Jan. 20, 1942 2,713,432 Lorimer July 19, 1955

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2270664 *Nov 6, 1940Jan 20, 1942Towmotor CoIndustrial truck
US2713432 *Sep 14, 1951Jul 19, 1955Lorimer Collins SLift truck apparatus for unloading lumber and the like
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3184088 *Sep 11, 1961May 18, 1965Clark Equipment CoHydraulic control system for moving clamping members on a lift truck laterally, independently of each other, and simultaneously in the same and opposite directions
US3221912 *Dec 30, 1964Dec 7, 1965Mcwilliams Joseph ELift truck arrangement for system of handling bagged mail
US3245444 *Aug 21, 1964Apr 12, 1966Strombeck Carl EBark stripping mechanism
US3366258 *May 12, 1964Jan 30, 1968Chemetron CorpApparatus for storing and transferring rails
US3561628 *Dec 14, 1965Feb 9, 1971Thomas N MelinLoad handling in fork-lift trucks movable fork cover for forklift truck
US5087166 *Jul 13, 1990Feb 11, 1992Sft Ag SpontanfordertechnikHandling vehicle for printed product reels
US7011487Mar 6, 2001Mar 14, 2006Jervis B. Webb CompanyApparatus for transport and delivery of articles
Classifications
U.S. Classification414/659
International ClassificationB66F9/14
Cooperative ClassificationB66F9/144, B66F9/19, B66F9/14
European ClassificationB66F9/19, B66F9/14F2, B66F9/14