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Publication numberUS2918283 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 22, 1959
Filing dateFeb 21, 1958
Priority dateFeb 21, 1958
Publication numberUS 2918283 A, US 2918283A, US-A-2918283, US2918283 A, US2918283A
InventorsPaul M Marschalk
Original AssigneePaul M Marschalk
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Basketball practice device
US 2918283 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 22, 1959 P. M. MARSCHALK BASKETBALL PRACTICE DEVICE Filed Feb. 21, 1958 M MA R5 CHA L K INVENTOR.

United States Patent O BASKETBALL PRACTICE DEVICE Paul M. Marschalk, Faribault, Minn.

Application February 21, 1958, Serial No. 716,794

Claims. (Cl. 273-15) The present invention relates to a basketball practice device adapted to be mounted on a standard basketball goal and more particularly to such a basketball practice device which is adapted to be held firmly in place on said standard basketball goal by forces developed within said device when the device is mounted on the goal.

The basketball practice device of this invention comprises a C-ring having a plurality of radially extending and depending bifurcated legs affixed thereto. The C- ring is constructed of a material which permits it to be expanded and contracted circumferentially and to thereby be mounted on a standard basketball goal so that the bifurcated legs of the device are forced outwardly into engagement with the basketball goal by the forces de veloped with the C-ring. By C-ring I mean an annular ring having any small section thereof removed to form a ring having the general appearance of a capital C. r

This C-ring is of slightly smaller diameter than the standard basketball goal, but of larger diameter than the standard basketball itself, and is mounted on a plane slightly above the plane of the goal so that the force of basketballs falling on the C-ring can be readily transmitted to the goal without danger of the 0-ring becoming disengaged therefrom.

The invention is particularly useful in improving the shooting accuracy of basketball players. During training and practice sessions, this practice device may be mounted on a standard basketball goal, and as it is slightly smaller in diameter than the goal, greater shooting accuracy is required to place the ball through the device than through the goal. Of course, during regular games the device is removed and the improved shooting accuracy developed by the players during practice sessions should result in a higher shooting percentage during the game.

An object of my invention is the provision of a basketball practice device for improving the shooting accuracy of basketball players.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a basketball practice device to be mounted on a standard basketball goal which engages the goal through forces developed within the device.

Other objects and attendant advantages of the present invention will become more apparent as the specification is considered in connection with the accompanying drawings in which: t

Figure 1 is a top plan view of the present invention mounted on a standard basketball goal;

Figure 2 is a perspective view of the invention mounted on a standard basketball goal; and,

Figure 3 is a sectional view taken along the lines 3-3 of Figure 1.

Referring now to the drawings, in which like reference numerals designate like parts throughout the several views thereof, there is shown in Figures 1 and 2 a standard basketball goal mounted on a backboard 11 (only partially shown) by means of an angular bracket 12. The bracket may be fastened to the goal by welding or other ICC suitable means and to the backboard by means of bolts 13 and 14. Suitable side braces 15 are also provided to give the goal proper stability.

Mounted on the goal 10 is a basketball practice device of the present invention generally denominated by the numeral 16. The device comprises a ring having a small section cut away to form a C-ring 17 having end portions 18 and 19 with a space 20 therebetween. The C-ring 17 has a plurality, preferably four, of radially extending and depending legs 21, 22, 23, and 24 respectively, spaced at convenient positions. Two of the legs 21 and 24 are positioned near the end portions 18 and 19 to provide suitable support for that portion of the C-ring, while the other two legs 22 and 23 are positioned so as to divide the remainder of the C-ring into three substantially equal sectors. Each of the legs has its end portion bifurcated to form a central opening 25 and a pair of lugs 26 and 27 (see Figure 3). The opening 25' is preferably semicircular in cross section and of the proper size to receive the goal 10 in a tight fitting relationship. The legs 21, 22, 23, and 24 extend downwardly at such an angle that the plane of the C-ring is slightly above that of the goal so that the force of basketballs striking the C-ring 17 from above can be readily transmitted to the goal 10 without the danger of disengagement.

The c-ring 17 and the legs 21, 22, 23, and 24 are preferabiy formed of metal so that the space 20 between the end portions 13 and 19 may be varied by exerting a force on the legs 21 and 24 or on other suitable portions of the C-ring 17. The C-ring is formed in such a-manner that the space 2% between the end portions 18 and-19' has a greater length when the practice device is in an unrestrained position, that is, when it is unmounted than it has when the device is mounted on the goal 10 as shown in Figures 1 and 2. Thus, when the C-ring is in an unrestrained condition-unmounted-the bifurcated legs extend outwardly farther than they do when mounted and an annulus described by any three of the semicircular openings 25 would have a diameter larger than the diameter of the goal 10. Also, the diameter of the C-ring itself is larger in this unrestrained position than it is when mounted on the goal.

When mounting the device, the two end portions 18 and 19 are forced together so that the diameter of the G-ring 17 is smaller than shown in Figure 1. The openings 25 in the legs 21, 22, 23, and 24 are then fitted over the goal It} and the C-ring is released allowing it to expand to the diameter shown in Figure 1. In this position, the 0-ring 17 is restrained in such a position that the residual forces in the C-ring itself force the legs 21, 22, 23, and 24 outwardly into engagement with the goal It} and these residual forces, tending to expand the O- ring, hold the C-ring in the engaged position shown in the drawings. In removing the C-ring 17 from the goal M1, the two end portions 18 and 19 are forced together and the practice device may be simply and readily removed from the goal.

It is thus apparent that the present invention provides an extremely simple and rugged basketball practice device which may be mounted and removed from a standard basketball goal with a minimum of effort and manipulation.

it will be understood that the invention is not to be limited to the exact construction shown and described, but that various changes and modifications may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

I claim:

1. A basketball practice device adapted? to be mounted on a standard basketball goal comprising; a C-ring capable of expansion and contraction in a circumferential direction, said C-ring having at least three bifurcated legs Patented Dec. 22, 1959- depending therefrom adapted to engage said standard basketball goal, the portions of said bifurcated legs which engage said standard basketball goal describing a smaller annulus than said standard basketball goal when said C-ring is in a fully contracted position and describing a larger annulus than said standard basketball goal when said C-ring is in a normal unrestrained position, whereby said C-ring may be contracted circumferentially and mounted on said standard basketball goal and whereby said C-ring develops residual forces which force the bifurcated portions of said legs into firm engagement with said standard basketball goal when said C-ring is mounted on said standard basketball goal.

- 2. A basketball practice device adapted to be mounted on a standard basketball goal comprising a C ring capa- :ble of circumferential contraction from its normal unrestrained, position, said G-ring having a plurality of radially extending and depending bifurcated legs affixed thereto for engaging said standard basketball goal, said C-ring being contracted from its normal unrestrained position .when said C-ring is mounted on said standard basketball goal whereby said bifurcated legs exert a force against said standard basketball goal to position said basketball practice device firmly in place upon said standard basketball goal.

3. A basketball practice device adapted to be mounted on a standard basketball goal comprising, a radially split ring of smaller diameter than said standard basketball goal and being capable of circumferential contraction from its normal unrestrained position, said radially {split ring having a plurality of legs afiixed thereto and extending therefrom for engaging said standard basketball goal, said radially split ring being contracted from its normally unrestrained position when said radially split ring is mounted on said standard basketball goal whereby said legs will exert a force against said standard basketball goal to position said basketball practice device firmly in place on said standard basketball goal.

4. A basketball practice device adapted to be mounted on a standard basketball goal comprising, an annular member of smaller diameter than said standard basketball goal, said annular member having a section removed to leave a radially split annular member which is capable of expansion and contraction in a circumferential direction, a plurality of legs depending from said annular member for engaging said standard basketball goal, said radially split annular member being contracted from its normal unrestrained position when mounted on said standard basketball goal whereby said legs will exert a force against said standard basketball goal to position said basketball practice device firmly in place upon said standard basketball goal.

5. A basketball practice device adapted to be mounted on a standard basketball goal comprising, a radially split ring of smaller diameter than said standard basketball goal and being capable of circumferential contraction from its normally unrestrained position, means aflixed to said radially split ring and extending therefrom for engaging said standard basketball goal, said radially split ring being contracted from its normal unrestrained position when it is mounted on said standard basketball goal whereby said means will exert a force against said standard basketball goal to position said radially split ring firmly in place on said standard basketball goal.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1904836 *May 14, 1930Apr 18, 1933Earl R PeoplesGoal
US2708576 *Sep 29, 1952May 17, 1955Verkuilen JohnBasket ball rebound ring
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3342486 *Jun 17, 1965Sep 19, 1967William E FarleyPractice rail attachment for a basketball backboard
US3348840 *Apr 13, 1965Oct 24, 1967Dix Wayne LeeResiliently mounted basketball practice and rebound ring
US3365196 *May 6, 1965Jan 23, 1968Edwin H. MillerTiltable basketball rim and support therefor
US3612528 *Mar 28, 1969Oct 12, 1971Marvin Glass & AssociatesDeformable projectile and target having a variable opening
US3913916 *Jun 12, 1974Oct 21, 1975Jr James G MartinIndoor-outdoor goal with automatic return and storage compartment
US4213606 *Apr 2, 1979Jul 22, 1980Wilson Robert EDevice to improve shooting a basketball
US5207789 *Apr 3, 1992May 4, 1993Accu-Rim, Inc.Basketball shooting aid
US5364092 *Nov 18, 1993Nov 15, 1994Riepe Addison EBasketball shooting accuracy practice rim
US5433095 *Jul 6, 1993Jul 18, 1995Mitchell; Thomas M.Basketball hoop security device
US5439210 *Dec 16, 1993Aug 8, 1995Davis; Daniel W.Basketball goal locking device
US5480139 *Jan 24, 1994Jan 2, 1996Aubrey J. Owen, Jr.Basketball practice assembly
US5803837 *Jun 25, 1997Sep 8, 1998Lofaso And Lofaso IncorporatedBasketball practice device
US5827136 *Oct 1, 1997Oct 27, 1998Hasbro, Inc.Basketball backboard and hoop assembly including an enlarged secondary training rim
US5928094 *May 7, 1998Jul 27, 1999Sagedahl; Sherwood K.Basketball practice device and method of using same
US6913551Jan 24, 2003Jul 5, 2005Sam FoleyBasketball training aid
US7229367Aug 11, 2004Jun 12, 2007Hos Development CorporationQuick connect basketball practice device
US7427244Mar 6, 2006Sep 23, 2008Patel Dipak MBasketball training device
US8162781Apr 7, 2010Apr 24, 2012Heflin Sr Ronald LTraining apparatus, glove and method for promoting basketball shooting skills
US20140092253 *Nov 25, 2013Apr 3, 2014Pillar Vision, Inc.Training devices for trajectory-based sports
WO2006091507A1 *Feb 17, 2006Aug 31, 2006Competitor S Edge LtdBasketball rim attachment
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/448, D21/703
International ClassificationA63B63/08
Cooperative ClassificationA63B63/083
European ClassificationA63B63/08B