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Publication numberUS2918919 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 29, 1959
Filing dateApr 19, 1957
Priority dateApr 19, 1957
Publication numberUS 2918919 A, US 2918919A, US-A-2918919, US2918919 A, US2918919A
InventorsFrederick J Wallace
Original AssigneeAmerican Cystoscope Makers Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Combined ureteral stone remover and drain
US 2918919 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 29, 1959 F. J. WALLACE COMBINED URETERAL STONE REMOVER AND DRAIN Filed April 19, 1957 United States Patent CONIBINED URETERAL STONE REMOVER AND DRAIN Frederick J. Wallace, New York, N.Y., assignor to American Cystoscope Makers, Inc., New York, N.Y., a cor- -poration of New York Application April 19, 1957, Serial No. 653,956

3 Claims. (Cl. 12S-328) This invention relates to a surgical instrument and more particularly to a ureteral stone remover of the type which includes a wire basket for entrapping and removing the stone.

Instruments for use in the removal of ureteral stones have been known and used for many years. While such instruments have been used with considerable success there are, nevertheless, occasions when diilculties are encountered in the removal of the stone which result in prolongation of the operation for a considerable length of time. For example, after the stone has been trapped in the wire basket of the stone remover and the process of withdrawing the stone remover from the ureter has been started, the stone may become impacted because of the irregularity of its shape or as the result of some other condition. When this occurs a prolonged procedure, usually the application of some slight traction, is required to bring the instrument and stone down. The problem created by such an occurrence may be best appreciated when it is understood that several days may be required before the instrument may be removed from the body passage. Hitherto, during the course of such lengthy procedures drainage from the affected kidney and ureter was blocked. This not only caused discomfort to the patient but also the likelihood of kidney tissue damage increased with the length of time involved and often did occur.

It is, therefore, a principal object of this invention to provide an improved stone remover which greatly facilitates the removal of ureteral stones and which provides for continued drainage of iluids from the ureter and kidney while it is in place.

Further objects as well as advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the following description as Well as the accompanying drawing in which:

Figure 1 is an elevational view of a ureteral stone remover constructed in accordance with the present invention; and

Figure 2 is a longitudinal cross-sectional View thereof on an enlarged scale.

Referring now to the drawing in detail ureteral stone remover comprises a rod-like, elongated flexible tubular member 11 having a bore 12 extending from end to end thereof. At its proximal end tubular member 11 lmay be provided with a longitudinally movable handle 13 which leaves the proximal end of bore 12 unobstructed and which may be locked in place by means of clamp 14. A collar 15 mounted about the distal end of tubular member 11 serves to anchor one end of a plurality of spaced wires 16 thereto. Wires 16, of which there may be four, form the stone basket and are spaced more or less regularly about the axis of tubular member 11. The distal ends of Wires 16 are joined by means of a suitable connector to the proximal end of a ilexible tapered member 17 forming a liliform tip which is the distal portion of stone remover 10. Filiform tip 17 is formed with a bore at its proximal end to receive a portion of female connector 18 having a reduced diameter at one end. The

2 opposite -end'of connector 18 is internally threaded to receive the complementarily threaded portion I'of 'male connector 19. The distal ends of wires v16 are soldered orctherwise suitably connected to connector 19.

As shown, the bore or passageway 12 in tubular member 11 is free of obstructions and provides a free path whereby fluids may drain from the area of the basket lformed by Wires 16. Preferably, tubular member 11 is metallic being generally in the form of a tightly wound helix.

Manipulation and use of stone remover 10 is in accordance with Well known procedures. Wires 16 are formed of stainless, resilient steel permanently set so that after the opposite ends thereof are joined to collar 15 and connector 19 they each normally remain curved as shown. When the basket is expanded or contracted as when collar 15 and connector 19 are moved forward or away from one another the wires present smoothly curved surfaces free of angles. With the wires spread the instrument is manipulated until the stone is Within the basket. Withdrawal of the instrument places wires 16 under tension which serves to draw them toward one another to close the basket and thereby secure the stone therein.

With the present instrument, should an obstruction or some other cause prevent removal of the stone thereby making it necessary to leave the instrument and stone in place Within the body, passageway 12 affords the drainage required, thereby minimizing the possibility of tissue damage and discomfort to the patient. The present instrument has been successfully used in the removal of ureteral stone and has vbeen successfully used to provide the required drainage for about three days.

The terms and expressions which have been employed are used as terms of description and not of limitation, and there is no intention, in the use of such terms and expressions, of excluding any equivalents of the features shown and described or portions thereof, but it is recognized that various modifications are possible within the scope of the invention claimed.

I claim:

1. A combined ureteral stone remover and drain, comprising an elongated flexible rod-like member having an open ended bore formed longitudinally therethrough, a plurality of wire members arranged in annular array and joined at one end thereof to the exterior peripheral portion of the distal end of said rod-like member with the base thereof unobstructed, and a flexible tapered member joined t0 the opposite end of said wire members, whereby said bore provides a drainage path for tluid when said rod-like member is positioned within the ureter of a patient.

2. A combined ureteral stone remover and drain, comprising an elongated exible rod-like member having an open ended bore formed longitudinally therethrough, a plurality of arcuate resilient wire members, a collar securing one end of each of said wires to the exterior peripheral portion of the distal end of said rod-like member with the base thereof unobstructed, a connector secured to the opposite end of each of said wires, said wires being arranged in annular array and forming a basket, and a flliformtip removably connected to said connector, whereby said bore forms an open ended drainage path for fluid when said rod-like member is positioned within the ureter of a patient.

3. A combined ureteral stone remover and drain, comprising an elongated flexible rod-like member having an open ended bore formed longitudinally therethrough, a plurality of arcuate resilient wire members, a collar securing one end of each of said Wires on the external peripheral portion of the distal end of said rod-like member leaving said base free and unobstructed, a connector Patented Dec. y29, 1959.

S3 secured to the opposite end of each of said wires, said wires being arranged in annular array and forming a basket, a handle mounted on said rod-like member and movable longitudinally therealong leaving the proximal end of said bore open, a clamp for anchoring said handle in a selected position along said rod-like member, and a liform tip removably connected to said connector, whereby said bore forms an open ended drainage path for fluid when said rod-like member is positioned Within the ureter of a patient.

References Cited in the le of this patent York, N.Y., 1938, page 5, No. 344. sion 55.)

(Copy in Divi-

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3108593 *Mar 13, 1961Oct 29, 1963Jacob A GlassmanSurgical extractor
US3108594 *Aug 14, 1962Oct 29, 1963Jacob A GlassmanSurgical extractor and method of use
US3154079 *Feb 23, 1962Oct 27, 1964Lester M MckayCannula for heart and vascular surgery
US3336927 *Apr 6, 1964Aug 22, 1967Sklar Mfg Co JSurgical instrument for bile duct explorations
US3999551 *Jan 7, 1975Dec 28, 1976Bio-Medical Research, Ltd.Subcutaneous guide assembly
US4046150 *Jul 17, 1975Sep 6, 1977American Hospital Supply CorporationMedical instrument for locating and removing occlusive objects
US4203429 *Oct 11, 1977May 20, 1980Ediny Jury GMethod of removing concretions from the ureter
US4590938 *May 4, 1984May 27, 1986Segura Joseph WFor use through the working channel of an endoscope for removing stones
US4611594 *Apr 11, 1984Sep 16, 1986Northwestern UniversityMedical instrument for containment and removal of calculi
US5098441 *Apr 5, 1990Mar 24, 1992Dr. Andreas Lindner UnternehmensberatungLithotriptor
US5192286 *Jul 26, 1991Mar 9, 1993Regents Of The University Of CaliforniaMethod and device for retrieving materials from body lumens
US6190394 *Nov 5, 1999Feb 20, 2001Annex Medical, Inc.Medical retrieval basket
US7993329Aug 13, 2003Aug 9, 2011Cook Medical Technologies LlcERCP catheter with a removable handle for lithotriptor compatible basket
US8512352Apr 17, 2007Aug 20, 2013Lazarus Effect, Inc.Complex wire formed devices
US8523879Mar 31, 2005Sep 3, 2013Stuart J. LindStone retriever for flexible endoscopes having small diameter working channels
US8535334Apr 17, 2007Sep 17, 2013Lazarus Effect, Inc.Complex wire formed devices
US8545526Dec 26, 2008Oct 1, 2013Lazarus Effect, Inc.Retrieval systems and methods for use thereof
Classifications
U.S. Classification606/127, D24/135
International ClassificationA61B17/22
Cooperative ClassificationA61B17/221, A61B2017/2212
European ClassificationA61B17/221