Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2919801 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 5, 1960
Filing dateDec 10, 1956
Priority dateDec 10, 1956
Publication numberUS 2919801 A, US 2919801A, US-A-2919801, US2919801 A, US2919801A
InventorsPechy William
Original AssigneeAmerican Can Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Machine for treating and sorting can bodies
US 2919801 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 5, 1960 w. PECHY MACHINE FOR TREATING AND SORTING CAN BODIES Filed Dec. 10, 1956 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR.

WILLIAM PECHY BY ,6 2 A TTORNEYS Jan. 5, 1960 w. PECHY 2,91

MACHINE FOR TREATING AND SORTING 01m BODIES Filed Dec. 10, 1956 S SheetS-Sheet 2 WILLIAM PECHY BY ,ZM ZAZWU %//z dm @07 W QQZ ATTORNEYS Jan. 5, 1960 w. PEC'HY 2,919,801

I MACHINE FOR TREATING AND SORTING CAN BODIES Filed Dec. 10, 1956 s Sheets-Sheet :s

INVENTOR.

WILLIAM PECHY ATTORNEYS MACHINE FOR TREATING AND SORTING CAN BODIES William Pechy, Belmar, N.J., assignor to American Can Company, New York, N.Y., a corporation of New Jersey Application December 10, 1956, Serial No. 627,175

29 Claims. (Cl. 209-111) The present invention relates to a machine for treating surfaces of can or container bodies and has particular reference to devices for feeding the bodies into treating position and for maintaining the portion of the surfaces being treated in a predetermined position.

This is a continuation-in-part of my United States application Serial Number 526,433 filed August 4, 1955, now abandoned, on Machine for Inspecting Coating on Can Bodies.

In the manufacture of cans for various products their interior surfaces are sometimes treated as by being sprayed or coated with a suitable material or by other operations Fig. 7 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 7-7 in Fig. 6.

As a preferred or exemplary embodiment of the instant invention the drawings disclose a machine for treating by electrically inspecting the inner coated surface of cylindri-.

cal can bodies A having open ends and moving in a substantially continuous procession and arranged in timed and spaced order. The can bodies A for this purpose are advanced into a treating or inspection station B (Figs. 1 and 2) where their advancement is temporarily arrested.

While at the treating or inspection station B a beam C of light (Fig. 2) from a suitable source D of lights is to protect the cans and/or the product. When sprayed or coated the treatment also often includes inspection for proper coverage and uniform thickness prior to shipment of the cans. Under high speed operating conditions such treatment is effected by rotating the cans so as to treattheir entire inner surfaces. In treating cans in this manner it has been found that very often the cans are slightly out-of-round and when rotated on their axes tend to wobble. The wobbling of .the cans causes a varying treatment of their inner surfaces and where inspection is effected by a beam of light the reflection of the beam varies and thus causes untrue readings of the condition of the surfaces. This results in the improper rejection of good cans and the passing of many unsuitable cans to such an extent that the device becomes unreliable.

An object of the instant invention is to overcome this difficulty by the provision of an apparatus which rotates a can body irrespective of its axis and simultaneously retains the portion of the can body wall being treated in a predetermined plane so that wobbling of out-of-round bodies has no effect on the true treatment of the body surfaces.

Numerous other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent as it is better understood from the following description, which, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, discloses a preferred embodiment thereof.

Referring to the drawings:

Figure 1 is a side elevation of an apparatus embodying the instant invention, with parts broken away;

Fig. 2 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 2-2 in Fig. 1, with parts broken away; the view also showing a wiring diagram of electrical devices used in the apparatus;

Fig. 3 is a reduced scale sectional view taken substantially along the line 33 in Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a schematic view illustrating principal parts of the discharge end of the apparatus shown at the left in Fig. 1, and a wiring diagram of electrical devices used therewith;

Fig. 5 is an enlarged sectional detail taken substantially along the line 5-5 in Fig. 1, parts being broken away;

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary elevational view of principal parts of the apparatus shown at the right in Fig. 1, and illustrating a modified form of the invention; and

projected into the body at an angle so as to impinge against the inner surface as shown in Fig. 2 and to reflect or deflect out of the opposite end of the body into a receiving device such as an electric eye or photoelectric cell device E (Fig. 2). The beam C of light scans the entire surface of the body, the body being rotated through at least one complete revolution while at the inspection station, by rolling the body on its side wall in such a manner that the body wall as it progressively passes through.

the point adjacent the beam of light, remains constantly at a predetermined level or in other words remains within a predetermined plane. In this manner any out-of-roundness of the body which causes the body wall to wobble, i.e.'rise and fall, relative to the beam of light, is compensated for, so that the relation of the. beam of light and the wall of the rotating body, remains constant and thereby results in true readings of the coacting condition.

An improperly coated body is detected by the light beamC reflected to the photoelectric cell device E in the usual manner and this is utilized to actuate a discharge mechanism which segregates the improperly coated bodies from the properly coated bodies upon advancement of the bodies from the inspection station B to a discharge station G (Fig. 1) located at the discharge end of the machine (at the left in Fig.1). The segregation and discharge of the bodies completes the cycle of operation of the machine.

The can bodies A enter the machine at one end thereof, the right as viewed in Fig. 1, in a horizontal or on-side position, by way of a vertical runway 21, defined by a plurality of spaced and parallel, vertically disposed guide rails 22. At their lower ends the guide rails 22 are secured to a base plate 23 having an opening therein through which the can bodies pass. The plate 23 is secured to a vertical frame 24 which constitutes the mainframe of the machine. Adjacent its openings, the base plate 23 is formed with a pair of depending end plates 26 having curved guide grooves 27 for guiding the can bodies into position adjacent the outer periphery of a continuously rotating star wheel 28.

The star wheel 28 is mounted on a short shaft 29 (Figs. 1 and 3) journaled in a suitable bearing formed in the frame 24. The shaft 29 is rotated by a spur gear 31 which is carried on the shaft and which meshes with and is driven by a gear 32 mounted on a short shaft 33 journaled in a bearing in the frame 24. The gear 32 meshes with and is driven by a gear 34 mounted on a short shaft 35 journaled in a bearing in the frame 24 and this gear 34 meshes with and is driven by a main driving gear 36. The gear 36 is mounted on a main driving shaft '37 (see also Fig. 2) which is journaled in a bearing 38 in the frame 24. The main driving shaft 37 is rotated continuously in any suitable manner.

The star wheel 28 preferably is formed with a plurality of peripheral prongs 41 and adjacent pockets 42 for propelling can bodies A individually and intimed and spaced order along a curved path of travel downwardly under the outer periphery of the wheel. A pair of spaced and parallel curved guide rails 43 disposed adjacent the periphery of the wheel and forming continudata-e01 3 ations of the guide grooves 27 in the slide plates 26, retain the can bodies A in the star wheel pockets 42. These guide rails 43 are formed with lugs 44 secured to the frame 24.

The prongs 41 of the star wheel 28 deliver the can bodies individually to a transfer station H (Fi 1) which is adjacent the outer periphery of a continuously rotating carrier turret 46. The carrier turret 46 is mounted on and rotates with the main driving shaft 37 (see Fig. 2). This carrier turret 46 is formed with a pair of spaced and parallel disc-like flanges 47 having the major portions the outer peripheries concentric wtih the axis of the driving shaft 37 and of equal radii so as to provide a wide support for and to retain a can body received on the flanges in a position parallel to the axis of the turret 46. At spaced intervals around the peripheries of the flanges 47, they are formed with pockets 48, each of which is provided adjacent its following edge with an outwardly, radially projecting lug or protuberance 49. Four of these pockets 4-8 and lugs 49 are shown in the drawings.

The carrier turret 46 is rotated in time with the star wheel 23 with the outer concentric peripheral portions of the turret in substantially tangential relation to the path of travel of the can bodies A at the transfer station H. The star wheel 28 advances a can body into the transfer station Hand substantially into engagement with a concentric portion of the outer periphery of the carrier turret 46 just behind or in back of a lug 49 as shown at the left in Fig. 1. In this initial relation of a can body A with the carrier turret 46 a propelling finger 52 carried on the carrier turret 46 engages behind the can body and a'dvaneesthe' body with the turret. A pair of spaced and parallel'curved guide rails 53 secured to the frame 24 and extending around the upper portion of the path of travel of the'peripher'y of the turret 46, retain the can body in engagement with'the periphery of the turret.

There are four propelling" fingers 52, one for each con centric portion or'face 54 of the turret flanges 47, be-' tween the lugs 49. These fingers 52 are disposed bepins 55 (Figs. 1 and 2) carried in the turret flanges. One pins (Figs. 1 and 2) carried in the turret flanges. One end of each pivot pin 55 extends beyond the flanges 47 and carries'a cam lever 56 which on its free end carries a cam roller 57 which operates in a cam groove 58 of a stationary face cam 59 which surrounds the main driving shaft bearing 38 and is secured to the frame 24.

When a propelling finger 52 picks up a can body A at the transfer station H it takes the body away from the star wheel 28 and advances it with the carrier turret 46 along the curved guide rails 53 in a close relation to the lug 4% located just ahead of the can body as shown in Fig. I. The propelling finger 52 remains in propelling contact with the advancing can body A until the body reaches the treating or inspection station B. At the treating or inspection station the finger 52 pushes the can body into engagement with a stationary stop comprising a freely rotatable roller 62 (Fig. l) mounted on a pivot pin 63 carried in a bracket 64 secured to the frame 24.

When the body engages against the stop roller 62, the propelling finger 52 rocks back away from the body to a position within the outer peripheral faces of the turret flanges 47, for clearance passage under the body so as to leave the body at the treating or inspectionstation B while the turret 4'6 continues to rotate. This rocking of the propelling finger 52 is effected by the traversing of the cam groove 58 by the cam roller 57.

As soon as the can body engages against the stop roller 62 at the treating or inspection station B, it is pressed downwardly against the outer peripheral faces 54 of the carrier turret flanges 47 by a pair of spaced and parallel freely rotatable pressure rollers 66 (Figs. 1 and 2) which are normally disposed above and clear of the path of travel ofthe can bodies but. which are movable simultaneously into engagement with the side wall of a body positioned at the treating or inspection station E. The rollers 66 engage the body at widely spaced points to retain the body parallel to the axis of the turret and to prevent tilting of the body on the turret faces 54.

These pressure rollers 66 are carried on a free end of an arm 67 mounted on a pivot shaft 68 in a bearing 69 formed in the frame 24. The pivot shaft 68 also carries a cam lever 71 (Figs. 2 and 3) having a cam roller 72 which operates in a cam groove 73 of a rotatable face cam 74 formed intergrally with the main driving gear 3'6. The cam 74 rocks the cam lever 71 and arm 67 toward and away from the peripheral faces 54 of the turret flanges 47 in time with the entrance of the can bodies into the inspection station B.

When the pressure rollers 66 move down onto the side wall of a can body A, located at the treating or inspection station B, and are held against advancement by the stop roller 62, they press the body wall firmly against the peripheral flanges 47 of the carrier turret 46 to produce sufficient frictional engagement between the flange faces 54 and the body wall to cause the body to rotate; while remaining in a predetermined position, with a three point engagement with the stop roller 62, the pressure rollers 66 and the turret flange faces 54. In this positiontlie body does not rotate on its own axis buton the wall of the body with a rolling action that keeps the body wall always in engagement with the outer faces of the turret flanges 47. Since the flange faces'54 are' c'orn centric with the axis of the turret 46, the body wall at its point of contact with the flange face always remains in the same plane regardless of the degree of out-oh roundness of the body. Hence thebody wallat its po'int of contact with the'flange faces 54 is prevented firom rising or lowering.

While the can body A is rotating in" this position at the treating or inspection station-B the beam 0 of light is projected into the body against its inside coated surface at the point of contact between the body wall and the flange faces to inspect the coating as he're'inbefo'te mentioned. Since the body is rotated through at least one full revolution to completely scan the entire inside'surface of the body, the length of the peripheral face '54 of each turret flange 47, between a turret lug 49 and a following pocket 48, is made to correspond to a length slightly in excess of the circumference of a can body.

At the termination of the treatment or inspection of the body A, i.e. when the turret 46 has rotated sufficiently to carry the pocket 48 at the end of the peripheral faces'of the flanges 47 into the inspection station B, the body rolls off the flange faces and drops into the pocket; the adjacent lugs 49 serving to facilitate this movement of the body. The body disposed in the pocket 48 is below the stop roller 62. Hence the turret 46, as it continues to rotate, removes the inspected body from the treating or inspection station B and advances itunder the stop roller 62 along the curved guide rail 53, still in the turret pocket and propelled by the adjacent lugs 49, to a discharge wheel 76 (Fig. l) disposed adjacent the carrier turret 46. Immediately upon removal of the treated or inspected can body from the treating or inspection station B, the pressure rollers 66 are lifted, by the face cam 74, clear of the path of travel of the can bodies to) permit the next following incoming body to enter the inspection station B without interference.

The discharge wheel 76 is mounted on'a continuously rotating shaft 77 (Figs. 1 and 3) which is 'journaled in a bearing in the frame 24 and which carries a driving gear 78 (Fig. 3). The gear 78 meshes with and is driven by a gear 79 mounted on a short shaft 81 journaled in a bearing in the frame'24. The gear 79 in turn meshes with and is driven by a gear 83 mouhted on a short shaft 84 journaled in a bearing in the frame 24. This gear 33 meshes with andis driven by the main driving gear 36. Through this gear train the discharge wheel 76 is rotated in the proper direction in time with the carrier turret 46.

The discharge wheel 76 is provided with three equally spaced peripheral pockets 85 (Fig. 1) formed in electromagnets 86 disposed in recesses 87 in the wheel. These pockets 85 rotate into register with the turret pockets 48 during the synchronized rotation of the wheel and the turret 46. Each magnet 86 is provided with a pair of projecting brushes 91 which engage against and ride along a pair of spaced and parallel curved electric contact strips 92 (see also Fig. 4) which are disposed adjacent the path of travel of the brushes 91 for a predetermined distance extending along an arc of substantially ninety degrees from a point immediately ahead of the point where the wheel and turret pockets 85, 48 rotate into register. These strips 92 are secured to an insulating plate 90 which is secured to the frame 24. One of the contact strips 92 is connected by a wire 94 (Fig. 4) to a source of electric current such as a generator 95. The other contact strip 92 is connected by a wire 96 to a normally closed electric switch 97 which is also connected by -a wire 98 to the generator 95. This normally closed circuit keeps the contact strips 92 energized.

Hence as a magnet 87 rotates into position adjacent the carrier turret 46, the magnet brushes 91 engage the contact strips 92 and thus energize the magnet. The magnet remains energized until it rotates with the discharge wheel 76 to a position where the brushes ride off the contact strips. The magnets thereupon become deenergized. These magnets 87 are utilized to segregate properly coated from improperly coated can bodies A as treated or inspected by the beam C of light.

For properly coated can bodies the beam C of light impinging against the inside coated surface of the rotating body at the inspection station B, is deflected out of the body onto the photoelectric cell device E as hereinbefore explained. The cell device E is connected into a normally closed electric circuit which receives electric current from a suitable source such as a generator 101 (Fig. 2). The generator 101 is connected by wires 102, 103 to a conventional amplifying unit 104 and the unit in turn is connected by wires 105, 106 to the photoelectric cell device E. The generator 101, through connecting wires 108, 109 also supplies current to the source D of light.

When the photoelectric cell device E receives the full intensity of the deflected light beam C, as it does for properly coated can bodies A, the circuit remains closed and the inspected can body after leaving the inspection station B is picked up by an energized magnet 86 on'the discharge wheel 76 when the pocket 85 of the wheel and the pocket 43 of the carrier turret 46 rotate into register. The can body clings to the energized magnet 86 and is thus removed from the carrier turret pocket 48 as the wheel pocket and turret pocket rotate out of register. The properly coated can body thus is carried by the discharge wheel 76 to a position where the magnet brushes 91 ride off the contact strips 92. At this position the magnet becomes deenergized and the can body thereupon is released and falls away from the discharge wheel. The falling can body is received in a good can body chute 111 which is disposed under the discharge wheel 76 and which directs the body rolling on its side wall, to a suitable place of deposit for properly coated or good bodies. I

If, upon inspection, the coating of the can body at the inspection station B is found to have imperfections, the beam C of light deflected from the coated surface is reduced in intensity or is deflected at an angle away from the photoelectric cell device E and hence the cell device does not receive the deflected beam at all or receives it only at a reduced intensity. This action on the cell device E deenergizes the connecting electric circuit and sets in motion an indexing mechanism which op- I erates to prevent energization of a discharge magnet 86 for such an improperly coated body and thus prevents this body from being discharged into the good body chute 111. For this purpose the machine is equipped with a time delay or indexing device which is set by the photoelectric cell device E at the inspection station B and operates to temporarily open the electric switch 97 at the discharge station to break the discharge magnet circuit and thereby prevent the passing magnet 86 from being energized.

With the magnet 86 deenergized, it fails to pick up the improperly coated can body from the carrier turret 46. The body thus remains in its turret pocket 48 and is carried past the good can chute 111 and is swept off into an improperly coated can body chute 112 (Fig. 1) disposed immediately below the chute 111. The chute 112 directs the improperly coated can body, rolling on its side wall, to any suitable place of deposit.

The indexing device which prevents energization of a magnet 86 comprises in part a plurality of slideable indexing pins 115 (Figs. 1, 2, 4 and 5) which are carried in bores 116, 117 (Fig. 5) formed in and extending transversely of the carrier turret flanges 47 and in blocks 118 disposed between the flanges. There is one pin 115 and one block 118 for each pocket 48 in the turret 46. The pins 115 are longer than the width of the carrier turret 46 so that one end projects beyond one or the other side of the turret. In their normal positions the pins project beyond the turret on the right as viewed in Fig. 2. When an improperly coated can body is detected by the photoelectric cell device E, the pin 115 corresponding to the pocket 48 in which the body is located, is pushed toward the left (Fig. 2) to the position shown in Fig. 5. The pins are locked in their normal and displaced positions by a spring detent 121 (Fig. 5) which engages in lockingv grooves 122, 123 formed in the pins.

Movement of a pin 115 from its normal position to a displaced position preferably is effected by a pusher plate 125 (Figs. 1 and 2) which is disposed near the inspection station B and adjacent the path of travel of the pins 115. The pusher plate 125 is mounted on a movable.

core 126 of an electric solenoid 127 connected by wires 128, 129 to the amplifying unit 104. The solenoid 127 is normally energized to hold the pusher plate 125 in a retracted position as shown in Fig. 2, against the resistance of a compression spring 131 coiled around the core 126 between the plate and the solenoid. When the photoelectric cell device circuit is deenergized by detection of an improperly coated can body A, the solenoid 127 is also deenergized and the spring pushes the plate 125 against the end of a passing pin 115 and thereby pushes the pin from its normal position to the displaced position shown in Fig. 5.

When the improperly coated can body reaches the discharge wheel 76, the displaced indexing pin 115 engages and pushes laterally a breaker shoe 133 (Figs. 1 and 4) disposed between the electric switch 97 and the carrier turret 46 adjacent the discharge station. The shoe 133 is mounted on a pair of studs 134 (Fig. 4) yieldably carried in a bracket 135 attached to the frame 24. Springs 136 interposed between the bracket and the shoe 133 provide for the yieldability of the shoe. The shoe 133 engages against a movable element 137 of the switch 97.

Hencewhen the shoe 133 is actuated by the displaced indexing pin 115, it opens the switch97 through pressure on the movable element 137 and thereby breaks the magnet circuit to prevent energization of the magnet 86 corresponding to the turret pocket 48 which carries the improperly coated can body, to thus effect discharge of this body into the proper chute 112 as explained above. The displaced indexing pin 115 rides along the shoe 133 and thus holds the magnet deenergized until the can body is out of its range of attraction.

After performing its function, the displaced indexing pin 115 is reset, i.e., returned to its normal position for a repeat operation when required, by a stationary reset cam 139 (Figs. 1 and 2) which is formed on and projects placed'pin 115 engages against this cam 139 and is pushed back into normal position as the pin passes the cam during rotation of the carrier turret 46. This completes the cycle of operation of the machine.

In a modified form of the invention, permanent magnets 145, 146 (Figs. 6 and 7) are utilized on the carrier turret 46 instead of the propelling fingers 52. These magnets 145, 146 are disposed between the turret flanges 47 adjacent their outer peripheries as shown in Fig. 7. The magnets 145 are located adjacent the pocket projections 49 and flush with the peripheral faces 54 of the flanges 47 so as to pick up an entering can body from the transfer wheel 28 and hold it against the back of the lug 49 until it reaches the treating or inspection station B. At this treating or inspection station the stop roller 62 strips the can body away from the magnet and thus permits the body to roll on the peripheral faces 54 of the turret flanges 47.

The magnets 146 are located in the carrier turret pockets 4-8 and function to hold the treated or inspected can bodies in these pockets as they advance from the treating or inspection station B to the discharge station. These magnets 146 are of less strength than the discharge magnets 86 so that the discharge magnets can remove properly coated can bodies from the carrier turret pockets 43 when the discharge and turret pockets rotate into register for the discharge of the can bodies as hereinbefore explained in the preferred form of the invention. When an improperly coated can body is carried in a turret pocket 48, the magnet 146 holds the body in the pocket until it reaches and is stripped away from the magnet by the improperly coated can body discharge chute 112.

It is thought that the invention and many of its attendant advantages will be understood from the foregoing description, and it will be apparent that various changes may be made in the form, construction and arrangement of the parts without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention or sacrificing all of its material advantages, the form hereinbefore described being merely a preferred embodiment thereof.

I claim:

1. In a machine for progressively inspecting for imperfections the interiorly coated surfaces of cylindrical container bodies, the combination of a rotatable turret having a peripheral face of which at least a portion is concentric with the axis of said turret, actuating means for rotating said turret on its axis, means for carrying a container body on its side wall on said concentric portion of said face into an inspection station, means at said inspection station for holding and pressing said container body against said concentric portion of said face in a predetermined position to effect rotation of said body at said station through continued rotation of said turret to maintain and progressively pass the body side wall through a plane tangential to said concentric portion of said face at said station, inspecting means at said station for inspecting the interior surface of said rotating container body, and a clearance recess in said con centric portion of said face of said turret for receiving said container body at the termination of said inspection to remove said body from said station.

2'. in a machine for progressively inspecting for imperfections the interiorly coated surfaces of cylindricai container bodies, the combination of a rotatable turret having a peripheral face of which at least a portion is concentric with the axis of said turret, actuating means for rotating said turret on its axis, holding means for releasably holding a container body on its side wall on said concentric portion of said face and for advancing said body with said rotating turret into an inspection station, stop means at said inspection station for stopping said container body in a predetermined position temporarily irrespective of continu d rotation of said turret, pressure means also at said station for pressing said 8 container body against said concentric portion of said face and against said stop means to effect rotation of said container body at said station through continued rotation of said turret to maintain and progressively pass the body side wall through a plane tangential to said concentric portion of said face at said station, inspecting means at said station for inspecting the interior surface of said rotating container body, and a clearance recess in said concentric portion of said face of said turret for receiving said container body at the termination of said inspection to pass said inspected body under said stop means to remove said body from said station.

3. A machine of the character defined in claim 1 wherein said means for carrying said body on said concentric portion of said face is a stationary guide rail disposed adjacent the outer periphery of said turret for retaining said body against displacement from said turret face and a finger mounted on and movable with said' turret and engaging behind said body for advancing said body with said turret.

4. A machine of the character defined in claim 3' wherein said finger is pivotally mounted on said turret and wherein there is provided cam means for pivoting said finger away fro-m said body at said inspection station to leave said body at said station.

5. A machine of the character defined in claim 1 wherein said body holding means at said inspection station is'a freely rotatable stop roller disposed adjacent the periphery of said turret in the path of travel of said container body and mounted in a fixed position to act as a stop element.

6. A machine of the character defined in claim 1' wherein said body pressing means at said inspectionstation is a movable pressure element disposed adjacent the periphery of said turret above the path of travel of said container body and mounted on a movable lever arm and wherein cam means are provided for actuating said lever arm to press said pressure element against said body at said inspection station to frictionally engage the side Wall of said body against said stop roller and said concentric portion of the peripheral face of said turret.

7. A machine of the character defined in claim 6 wherein said pressure element is a pair of spaced and parallel freely rotatable pressure rollers engageable against the side wall of said body at Widely spaced points to retain said body against tilting.

8. A machine of the character defined in claim I wherein said turret is provided with a pair of spaced and parallel peripheral flanges and wherein said concentric portions of said face are formed in the peripheries of said fianges to provide a wide support for said body to retain said body in a position parallel to the axis of said turret.

9. A machine of the character defined in claim 1 wherein said clearance recess in said turret face is a pocket for receiving said body at said inspection station and wherein said concentric portion of said turret face is provided with a radial projection disposed adjacent the following edge of said pocket to facilitate removal of said body from said station and to propel said body in said pocket with said turret beyond said station.

10. A machine of the character defined in claim 1 wherein said turret is provided with a plurality of circumferentially spaced concentric portions of said periph: eral face and wherein each of said concentric portions is formed with a pocket and an adjacent radial projection for receiving an inspected container body from said inspection station and for propelling said body with said turret.

11. A machine of the character defined in claim 10 wherein there is provided a guide rail disposed adjacent the periphery of said turret for retaining said inspected bodies in said turret pockets.

12. A machine of the character defined in claim '10 whe'rein there is provideda star wheel disposed adjacent 'said turret for feeding saidbodies individually to said concentric portions of said turret face at a point adjacent and following said radial projections to leave the remainder of said concentric portions for rotation of said bodies at said inspection station, and wherein means are provided for rotating said turret and said star wheel in synchronism for said feeding operation.

13. A machine of the character defined in claim wherein said means for carrying a container body on said turret is a finger mounted on said turret and wherein each of said concentric face portions is provided with one of said fingers, said fingers being disposed adjacent and in spaced relation to said radial projections for retaining a received body in pisition adjacent a said projection for travel with said turret to said inspection station.

14. A machine of the character defined in claim 10 wherein magnet means are disposed in said turret pockets and in said concentric face portions adjacent said radial projections to retain uninspected bodies in place on said faces and to retain inspected bodies in place in said pockets.

15. A machine of the character defined in claim 1 wherein said inspecting means is a beam of light and wherein means are provided for projecting said beam into said body at an angle thereto and wherein means are provided for receiving the deflected portion of said beam of light and therethrough indicating the detection of an improperly coated container body. 16. A machine of the character defined in claim wherein said means for indicating the detection of an improperly coated body includes electromagnet means disposed beyond said inspection station and adjacent the periphery of said turret for picking up container bodies from said turret, an'electric circuit connecting with said electromagnets for normally energizing them, a time delay device operable by said deflected light beam for an improperly coated body and operable against said electric circuit to break said circuit for improperly coated body, whereby said electromagnets are deenergized and said bodies remain on said turret, and means for stripping such bodies oif said turret and for segregating them from the bodies removed by said electromagnets.

17. A machine of the character defined in claim 16 wherein said electromagnets are supported in a discharge wheel disposed adjacent said turret beyond said inspection station and wherein means are provided for rotating said wheel and said turret in synchronism to effect the transfer of said bodies to said wheel.

18. In a machine for treating surfaces of cylindrical container bodies, the combination of a rotatable turret having a peripheral face of which at least a portion is concentric with the axis of said turret, actuating means for rotating said turret on its axis, means for carrying a container body on its side Wall on said concentric portion of said face into a treating station, means at said treating station for holding and pressing said container body against said concentric portion of said face in a predetermined position to effect rotation of said body at said station through continued rotation of said turret to maintain and progressively pass the body side Wall through a plane tangential to said concentric portion of said face at said station, treating means at said station for treating a surface of said rotating container body, and a clearance recess in said concentric portion of said face of said turret for receiving said container body at the termination of said treatment to remove said body from said station. v

19. In a machine for treating surfaces of cylindrical container bodies, the combination of a rotatable turret having a peripheral face of which at least a portion is concentric with the axis of said turret, actuating means for rotating said turret on its axis, holding means for releasably holding a container body on its side wall on said concentric portion of said face and for advancing said body with said rotating turret into a treating station, stop means at said treating station for stopping said container body in a predetermined position irrespective of continued rotation of said turret, pressure means also at said treating station for pressing said container body against said concentric portion of said face and against said stop means to effect rotation of said container body at said station through continued rotation of said turret to maintain and progressively pass the body side wall through a plane tangential to said concentric portion of said face at said station, treating means at said station for treating a surface of said rotating container body, and a clearance recess in said concentric portion of said face of said turret for receiving said container body' at the termination of said treatment to pass said treated body under said stop means to remove said body from said station.

20. A machine of the character defined in claim 18.

wherein said means for carrying said body on said concentric portion of said face is a stationary guide rail disposed adjacent the outer periphery of said turret for retaining said body against displacement from said turret face and a finger mounted on and movable with said turret and engagnig behind said body for advancing said body with said turret.

21. A machine of the character defined in claim 20 wherein said finger is pivotally mounted on said turret and wherein there is provided cam means for pivoting said finger away from said body at said treating station to leave said body at said station.

22. A machine of the character defined in claim 18 wherein said clearance recess in said turret face is a pocket for receiving said body at said treating station and wherein said concentric portion of said turret face is provided with a radial projection dispozed adjacent the following edge of said pocket to facilitate removal of said body from said station and to propel said body in said pocket with said turret beyond said station.

23. A machine of the character defined in claim 18 wherein said turret is provided with a plurality of circumferentially spaced concentric portions of said peripheral face and wherein each of said concentric portions is formed with a pocket and an adjacent radial projection for receiving a treated container body from said treating station and for propelling said body with said turret.

24. A machine of the character defined in claim 23 wherein magnet means are disposed in said turret pockets and in said concentric face portions adjacent said radial projections to retain untreated bodies in place on said faces and to retain treated bodies in place in said pockets.

25. In a machine for treating container bodies, the combination of a rotatable turret, actuating means for constantly rotating said turret on its axis, propelling means mounted on and movable with said turret for releasably retaining a container body in a predetermined position on said turret while the turret advances said body into a treating station, holding means at said station for holding said body against advancement with said rotating turret for treatment, and removing means on said turret and spaced from said propelling means for receiving said body at the termination of said treatment to pick up and remove said body from said station.

26. In a machine for treating container bodies, the combination of a rotatable turret, actuating means for constantly rotating said turret on its axis, a finger mounted on and movable with said turret for engaging behind a container body on said turret and advancing it into a treating station, holding means at said station for bolding said body against advancement with said rotating turret for treatment, and removing means on said turret and spaced from said finger for receiving said body at the termination of said treatment to pick up and remove said body from said station.

27. In a machine for treating container bodies, the

combination of a rotatable turret, actuating means for constantly rotating said turret on its axis, a finger pivotally mounted on and movable with said turret for engaging behind a container body on said turret and advancing it into a treating station, holding means at said station for holding said body against advancement with said rotating turret for treatment, cam means for pivoting said finger away from said body at said treating station to leave said body at said station under the control of said holding means, and removing means on said turret and spaced from said finger receiving said body at the termination of said treatment to pick up and remove said body from said station.

28. In a machine for treating container bodies, the combination of a rotatable turret, actuating means for constantly rotating said turret on its axis, carrying means mounted on said turret for carrying a container body on said turret into a treating station, holding means at said station for holding said body against advancement with said rotating turret for treatment, said turret being 20 formed with a clearance recess in the periphery thereof and spaced from said carrying means for receiving said 12 body at the termination of said treatment, andra radial projection disposed adjacent the following edge oft'said recess to propel said body in said recess with. the turret beyond said station.

29. In a machine for treating container bodies, the combination of a rotatable turret, actuating means for constantly rotating said turret on its axis, magnetiode vices mounted on and movable with said turret for at trading and retaining a container body on saidturret and for advancing it into a treating station, holding means at said station for holding said body against advancement with said rotating turret for treatment, and removing means on said turret and spaced from said" magnetic devices for receiving'said body at the termination of said treatment to pick up and remove said body from said station.

References Cited in-thefile of thispatent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,809,639 Edwards Oct. 15, 1951"

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2809639 *Jun 23, 1954Oct 15, 1957Filter Tips LtdManufacture of composite cigarettes
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3164081 *Oct 26, 1962Jan 5, 1965Gen Instrument CorpElectronic component printer having rotating magnetic chuck
US3243036 *Dec 11, 1964Mar 29, 1966Western Electric CoCombined mechanical-magnetic article transfer apparatus
US3306421 *Dec 22, 1964Feb 28, 1967Metal Box Co LtdArticle feeding apparatus
US3355009 *Feb 10, 1966Nov 28, 1967Redland Tiles LtdArticle propelling apparatus
US3863763 *Jan 24, 1974Feb 4, 1975Richter Gedeon VegyeszetEquipment for the inspection of filled ampoules
US3977358 *May 8, 1975Aug 31, 1976Alphonse StroobantsCan feeding and coating apparatus
US4074809 *Jul 19, 1976Feb 21, 1978Coors Container CompanyApparatus and methods for inspection of can bodies by use of light
US4458804 *Aug 7, 1979Jul 10, 1984Sun Chemical CorporationContour in-feed means for continuous motion can decorator
US4479582 *Jan 11, 1983Oct 30, 1984Saint-Gobain EmballageSorting device for sorting conveyed objects
US4928511 *Dec 13, 1988May 29, 1990Sequa CorporationRotary cup infeed
US6357982 *Apr 6, 1998Mar 19, 2002Crown Cork & Seal Technologies CorporationApparatus for making can bodies
US6561341 *Jun 29, 2000May 13, 2003Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd.Apparatus for separating and supplying cylindrical cans and method therefore
DE2654068A1 *Nov 29, 1976Oct 27, 1977Paul GoerkeAutomatische vorrichtung zur aufbringung mindestens eines ringfoermigen teiles, z.b. beilagscheibe auf einen laenglichen gegenstand, z.b. schraube
WO1998057763A1 *Apr 6, 1998Dec 23, 1998Crown Cork & Seal Technologies CorporationApparatus for making can bodies
Classifications
U.S. Classification209/587, 198/608, 209/560, 209/561, 209/636, 198/379, 209/914, 414/433, 198/472.1, 209/919
International ClassificationG01N21/90, G01N33/00, B21D51/26
Cooperative ClassificationY10S209/919, G01N2033/0081, B21D51/2692, Y10S209/914, G01N21/909
European ClassificationG01N21/90Q, B21D51/26T