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Publication numberUS2920798 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 12, 1960
Filing dateMar 27, 1957
Priority dateMar 27, 1957
Publication numberUS 2920798 A, US 2920798A, US-A-2920798, US2920798 A, US2920798A
InventorsSamuel Arthur J
Original AssigneeGulf Research Development Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dispensers
US 2920798 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. J. SAMUEL Jan. 12, 1960 DISPENSERS 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed March 27, 1957 ATTORNEY A. J. SAMUEL DISPENSERS 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR zmw? .1. s/v/ r/z/a,

ATTORNEY Jan. 12, 1960 Filed Marqh 27, 1957 rim:

DISPENSERS Arthur J. Samuel, Pittsburgh, Pa., assignor to Gulf Research & Development Company, Pittsburgh, Pa., a corporation of Delaware This invention relates to improvements in dispensers for liquids or particulate substances which are maintained 7 under pressure of a gas for discharge through an eduction tube which extends substantially to the bottom of the dispensing receptacle and dips into the contained material.

More particularly, the invention comprises a dispenser in which the eductiontubeis articulated by means of a slip joint connecting its sections, the joint being of balland-socket type orofother suitable design permitting one section of the-tube'to swing relative to the other as the'dispens'ing receptacle is tilted, and to separate the sections of tube sufficiently to open an alternate inlet which lies beneath the --level of the contained material when the receptacle is inverted. Thus, when the dispenser is held upright, gas pressureonthe surface of the liquid forces the liquid upwardly through the entire length of the eduction tube, but when the receptacle is inverted, with the end of the tube exposed above the level of liquid, the alternate inlet opens to admit the liquid to the eduction passageway from the opposite end of the receptacle.

In the general type of pressure discharge dispenser which has heretofore been in common use it has been necessary to hold the receptacle in upright position as it is being emptied, so that the end of the eduction tube dips into the contained liquid or other material, for in such dispensers if the end of the. eduction tube becomes exposed, as when the receptacle is inverted or even appreciably tilted when only part full, gas alone will be discharged and when this occurs pressure within the receptacle is rapidly reduced to a degree which renders it ineffective to expel the remaining contents.

At times it is convenient, if indeed not necessary, to hold the dispenser inverted as, for example, in spraying insecticide into the crevice between a baseboard and floor, in applying paint to ceilings and corners, in applying pharmaceuticals, and in spraying such toiletries as hair dressing, cosmetics, dusting powder and perfume, as well as in dispensing many other products which are sold in pressurized packages.

It is accordingly an object of the present invention to provide a pressurized dispensing receptacle with an articulated eduction tube or passageway which is adapted to break at the juncture of the sections near the top of the receptacle when the receptacle is inverted, the sections being connected by a ball-and-socket joint or other connection permitting one section to swing in suspension from the other, and adapted to open an alternate inlet to theeduction passageway when one of its sections assumes an angular inclination to the other, and to close such alternate inlet when the dispenser is held upright or is only slightly tilted and the sections of eduction passageway are in complete or substantial alignment.

Other and further objects of the invention will be apparent from the following description and drawings in which,

Figure 1 is a longitudinal cross sectional view of a dispenser in upright position.

Figure 2 is a similar sectional view of the receptacle in inverted position.

United States Patent 2,920,798 Patented Jan. 12,1960

"Figure an a detail view of a modified form of slip joint connection in the eduction passageway.

Figure 4 is a similar sectional view of the modification of Figure 3, showing the positions assumed by the sections of eduction passageway when the dispensing receptacle is held in inverted position.

Referring more particularly to the drawings, the disemployed in aerosol dispensers in that it comprises a spring pressed plunger which flexes a diaphragm upon leading to i the nozzle.

In either case, it is in effect a section of the eduction tube or passageway and is to be so considered-as herein described and claimed.

'An eduction tube 15 hangs in suspension from the; v bulbous end 13 and..dips into the liquid or other fluent "material which-is to be dispensed. Thus,'when the receptacle is held in upright position, pressure of gas which fills the upper part of the receptacle forces the liquid through the length of the eduction tube or passageway to the nozzle.

The tube is suspended from the bulbous end 13 by an enlargement 16 constituting a socket in which the enlarged end 13 is received and retained by an annular inturned lip 17, the end 13 of the one section of eduction tube being sufliciently smaller than the socket 16 on the adjoining end of the other section of eduction tube to permit swinging movement of the suspended section as well as its axial movement relative to the other. Thus, as shown in Figure 2, when the receptacle is inverted the socket 16 and enlarged end 13 partly telescope and the tube 15 assumes a canted position in which one end will rest against the wall of the receptacle, the annular lip 17 of the socket portion breaking contact with the surface of the bulbous end 13, whereby a passage 18 is opened for flow of the liquid or other fluent contents of the receptacle into the eduction passageway through this alternate inlet, the same being submerged in the inverted position of the receptacle.

Alternatively, as shown in Figures 3 and 4, the eduction tube 19 may be formed with a necked down portion 20 and a terminal spen'cal end 21 which forms a seal with the marginal lip of a socket 22 when the tube hangs in suspension. Upon inversion of the receptacle the tube 19 assumes a canted position, as shown in Figure 4, and slides into the socket to open a passageway around the necked down portion 20 through which the liquid or other material may enter the passageway and pass through the discharge valve assembly 11 to the nozzle.

For purposes of illustration the joint between sections of the eduction tube or passageway are herein shown as being of spherical shape. It will be understood, however, that it is within the contemplation of this invention that the joint between the sections of eduction tube may be conical, or indeed of any other convenient shape which adapts the meeting sections of tube to be sealed against leakage of pressuring gas when they are in axial alignment, but to permit separation of the sealing surfaces when the receptacle is so appreciably tilted as to submerge the joint between the section and the alternate inlet which it controls.

I claim:

1. In a dispensing receptacle for liquids or powdered materials Which are maintained under pressure of a confined gas, an articulated eduction tube connected to a discharge nozzle mounted on the receptacle and adapted to dip into the contained material when the receptaclei's inupright position, said eduction tube comprising two universally jointed sections loosely connected end to end for limited telescoping movement, the adjoining ends of said connected sections having, respectively, outwardly and inwardly extending annular surfaces which are adapted to limit the separation of the sections by their overlapping interengagement and to provide a fluid-tight seal therebetween at the limit of their separation, one of'said sections being telescopically slidable with respect to the other to disengage the sealing surfaces when the receptable is inverted, whereby in such inverted position a secondary inlet is opened into the eduction tube at a level below that of the material to be dispensed from the in- Verted receptacle. I p p 2. In a device according to claim 1, the outwardly and inwardly extending annular surfaces on theends of the sections of eduction tube comprising a ball end on one such section and a cylindrical socket receiving the same on the adjoining end of the connected section, said socket being formed with a circular lip which seats on the ball end with full circumferential contact as the angular relationship of the articulated sections varies with tilting of the receptacle.

3. In a dispensing receptacle for liquids or powdered materials which are mainfainednndrpressure'ofa confined gas, an articulated edduction tube connected to a discharge nozzle mounted on the receptacle and adapted to dip into the contained material when the receptacle is in upright position, the open end of the tube constituting a first inlet, said tube comprising two universally joined sections, one said section having a head at one end of larger diameter than the adjacent tubular portion of that section, the other said section having a socket the internal dimensions of which are larger than the dimensions of the head of the first said section and which has an inturned edge engageable behind the head of the first said section to provide a'fluid-tight seal therebetween at the limit of their separation, one of said sections being slidable with respect to the other to break contact between the sealing surfaces thereof when the receptacle is invertcd,'wvhereby in such inverted position a second inlet is opened into the eduction tube at a level below that of the material to bedispensed from the inverted receptacle.

References Cited'in the fii of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 750,521 Braymer' Jan; 26, 1904 1,557,127 Wilkin Oct. 13, 1925 2,088,790 Huthsing Aug. 3, 1937 2,403,850 Cowdrey et al. July 9, 1946 2,569,975 Cone Oct. 2, 1951' 2,686,652 Carlson Aug. 17, 1954 2,797,965 McKeman --July 2,1957

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3191816 *Oct 28, 1963Jun 29, 1965Shulton IncFluid dispensing valve
US3191817 *Oct 28, 1963Jun 29, 1965Shulton IncValve for dispensing fluid
US3658215 *Nov 24, 1969Apr 25, 1972Pittway CorpAerosol valve
US3670689 *Mar 20, 1970Jun 20, 1972Falcon Safety ProdTilt-operated hand held gas powered acoustic device
US5195664 *Apr 3, 1992Mar 23, 1993Steven RheaAll directional fluid pick-up
US5381961 *Jan 7, 1993Jan 17, 1995Evans; Robert M.Liquid dispensing devices
US5522548 *Oct 6, 1994Jun 4, 1996Summit Packaging Systems, Inc.Aerosol valve having swivelly mounted dip tube
US5527577 *Jun 22, 1993Jun 18, 1996Aptar Group, Inc.Flexible eduction tube for hand dispenser
US5647511 *Mar 29, 1984Jul 15, 1997Liqui-Box CorporationCollapsed bag with evacuation channel form unit
US5941421 *Dec 17, 1997Aug 24, 1999The Coca-Cola CompanyConduit member for collapsible container
US6027438 *Mar 13, 1998Feb 22, 2000The Coca-Cola CompanyMethod and apparatus for manufacturing a fluid pouch
US6045006 *Jun 2, 1998Apr 4, 2000The Coca-Cola CompanyDisposable liquid containing and dispensing package and an apparatus for its manufacture
US6102252 *Apr 19, 1999Aug 15, 2000The Coca-Cola CompanyConduit member for collapsible container
US6202943 *Jan 13, 1995Mar 20, 2001Evnx Technologies, Inc.Liquid dispensing devices
US6715644Dec 21, 2001Apr 6, 2004David S. Smith Packaging LimitedFlexible plastic container
US6742677 *Apr 16, 2003Jun 1, 2004Valois S.A.S.Fluid dispenser pump
US6935542May 15, 2002Aug 30, 2005S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Device for retaining and for inserting a flexible tube assembly into a fluid container
US6984278Jan 8, 2002Jan 10, 2006Cti Industries, CorporationMethod for texturing a film
US7017781Aug 2, 2005Mar 28, 2006Dr Pepper/Seven-Up, Inc.Collapsible container for liquids
US7357276Feb 1, 2005Apr 15, 2008Scholle CorporationCollapsible bag for dispensing liquids and method
US7972064Mar 29, 2005Jul 5, 2011Cti Industries CorporationOne way valve and container
US20030089737 *Dec 21, 2001May 15, 2003Michael WilfordFlexible plastic container
US20030127178 *Jan 8, 2002Jul 10, 2003Brent AndersonMethod for texturing a film
US20030136798 *Nov 8, 2002Jul 24, 2003Michael WilfordFlexible plastic container
US20030197029 *Apr 16, 2003Oct 23, 2003Valois S.A.Fluid dispenser pump
US20030213816 *May 15, 2002Nov 20, 2003Kevin HarrityDevice for retaining and for inserting a flexible tube assembly into a fluid container
US20050242114 *Feb 1, 2005Nov 3, 2005Chester SavageCollapsible bag for dispensing liquids and method
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US20060131328 *Mar 29, 2005Jun 22, 2006Brent AndersonOne way valve and container
US20070025648 *Jul 27, 2005Feb 1, 2007Kenneth MicnerskiCollapsible bag for dispensing liquids and method
US20070217718 *Mar 14, 2006Sep 20, 2007Kenneth MicnerskiCollapsible bag for dispensing liquids and method
EP0734290A1 *Nov 10, 1993Oct 2, 1996EVANS, Robert M.Liquid pickup components for dispensing devices
WO1994011114A1 *Nov 10, 1993May 26, 1994Evans Robert MLiquid pickup components for dispensing devices
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/402.19, 222/402.24, 222/464.3, 239/344, 239/573
International ClassificationB65D83/14
Cooperative ClassificationB65D83/32
European ClassificationB65D83/32