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Publication numberUS2920809 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 12, 1960
Filing dateJun 22, 1956
Priority dateJun 22, 1956
Publication numberUS 2920809 A, US 2920809A, US-A-2920809, US2920809 A, US2920809A
InventorsVictor Bray Herschel
Original AssigneeAlton Box Board Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cleat reinforced paperboard containers
US 2920809 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 12, 1960 H. v. BRAY CLEAT REINFORCED PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS Filed June 22, 3.956

2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Jan. 12, 1960 H. BRAY 2,920,809l

CLEAT REINFORCED PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS Filed June 22, 1956 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG 4. FIGS. /25

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States Patent CLAT REINFORCED PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS Herschel Victor Bray, Highland, Ill., assignor to Alton lBox Board Company, a corporation of Delaware Application June 22, 195'6, Serial No. 593,244

3 Claims. (Cl. 229-49) This invention relates to wood frame paperboard containers.

In packaging a heavy bulky item, such as a washing machine, it is customary to bolt the item on a skid, which isrthen covered with a paperboard side and top forming panels. The paperboard walls are spaced outwardly from the enclosed article in order to aiford protection, and since the packaged articles are usuallyV stacked during transportation and storage, it is customary to secure reinforcing posts or cleats to the side walls. A primary problem with this type of container is that of attaching the cleats. The box manufacturer may stitch or glue the cleats to paperboard panels, but this practice introduces diiculties in collapsing and storing containers prior to their use and complicates the box manufacturing operations.

A better practice is to ship the box blanks separate from the cleats, but this procedure creates problems for the user. It is not generally convenient to glue or stitch a wood cleat to an otherwise completed box, and similar proposals for attaching the cleats `tend to slow and complicate the package operation. Accordingly, it is an object of the invention to provide an improved system for attaching cleats to a wood frame paperboard container. More specifically, the invention contemplates an arrangement whereby reinforcing cleats are quickly and conveniently located within a tube-like paperboard enclosure without special fasteners.

A second problem with such containers is that of attaching cushioning pads, which serve the purpose of holding the side walls of the container in proper spaced relationship from the sides of the contained article. There have been various proposals, most of which involve adhering the pads directly to the article or to the inner surfaces of the container. This operation can be time consuming and in certain types of containers, the pads are too easily `detached in setting up the container or in subsequent movement of the package. For example, if it is desirable to employ a tube-like structure for forming the side walls, the pads can be knocked off in lowering the tube over the article, it being understood that the pads should have a relatively close fit between v the tube and article.

Accordingly, it is another object to provide an improved system for locating the cushioning pads within a container of the type referred to. Amongthe several other objects of the invention may be noted the provision of a container wherein the cushioning pads are securely held in position without stitching or gluing to the side walls or contained article; the provision of a container wherein the cushioning pads are readily handled at the packaging station; and the provision of a reinforced container 0f this general class wherein the cushioning pads and reinforcing cleats are combined so as to have a coaction with one another, both in setting up the container and thereafter.

Briefly, the invention contemplates that the article, such .as a washing machine, will be mountedupon a Y2,920,809 Patented Jan. 12, 1960 wooden skid or base, as has been customary in the past. Usually, this article will be in the shape of a block which is slightly Vsmaller than the bottom skid. An elongate corner member combining cushioning pads and reinforcing cleats is then fitted vertically to each corner of the article. The corner members comprise an elongate right angle section of paperboard extending substantially the full height of the article, a wooden cleat held within the corner of the angle section, and cushioning pads fastened to the angle section over the cleat, which cushioning pads may be adhered to both the cleat and angle section.

For example, the angle section might have side webs three inches wide where the cleat is approximately one inch square. The cushioning pads may be blocks built up from laminated sections of corrugated board, or they may be specially folded tube-like elements. Their actual dimensions will depend upon the relative size and shape of the container and contained article.

The side walls of the container are then formed from a collapsible tube of paperboard. In other words, an elongate rectangular blank is scored to define corner folds and its ends are fastened at a manufacturers joint, thereby providing a collapsible tube, which might also be slotted to have top-closure flaps. In use, the tube is lowered over the article and corner members, the elongate angle sections of the corner members guiding the tube downf wardly around the cleats and cushioning pads. It will be understood that a fairly tight fit is desired between the two cushioning pads and contained article. The sideforming tube may then be stitched to the bottom skid, a gummed reinforcing tape being applied to strengthen this stitched connection if desired. The skid may be built up to permit stitching on all four sides without obscuring the lift fork opening, and the reinforcing tape may incorporate glass bers or the like to improve tear resistance. The top can be formed by folding overvthe top-closure flaps, perhaps with additional reinforcement.

In the preferred embodiment, an additional panel supplements the top-closure flaps. This panel has cleats secured along two opposite margins, which horizontal top'cleats rest upon the upper ends of the vertical corner cleats. Flanges may be turned down along the other two margins to t between the side walls and the corner angle members.

Other features of the invention will be in part apparent from and in part pointed out in the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which: Fig. 1 is an oblique view of the container of this lnvention, parts being broken away;

Fig. 2 is a horizontal detailed cross section taken generally on the line 2 2 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a vertical detailed cross section taken generally on the line 3-3 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a detailed perspective of a corner member combining the cleat and reinforcing pads;

Fig. 5 is an enlarged section taken on the line 5--5 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 6 is a perspective view of the base, parts being broken away;

7 is a detailed perspective of the reinforcing tape;

Flg. 8 is a plan view of a die-cut and scored blank for a cushioning member;

Fig. 9 is a perspective view of the cushioning member made from the Fig. 8 blank; and

Fig. l0 is a top plan view of the Fig. 9 cushioning member.'

Referring now to the drawings, there is shown a con# tamer comprising a bottom skid 1 formed from wooden boards. A pair of lower boards 2 constitute the feet of the base, and they are secured in spaced parallel'relation ship by upper boards 3. The boards 1 and 3 may be nailed together, and provision is made for bolting or otherwise attaching the article onto the skid.

The `side walls of the container are formed of paperboard. An elongateV blank is scored to deiine corner folds 5 and its ends are fastened together along a manufacturers joint 7 in order to provide a tube, which may be collapsed flat or opened to a rectangular cross section. In other words, when the tube `is opened, it provides side walls 9 integrally joined together at corner folds S. This tube may also be scored and slotted in order to define top-closure flaps 15, this arrangement being similar to a slotted carton. The bottom 11 of the tube is left open, but is adapted to overlap the bottom skid, at least in part. A gummed reinforcing tape 13 preferably is secured along the lower margins 11, which tape might incorporate glass fiber strands 16 or other woven material to improve the tear resistance of the board V(Figs. 6 and 7). The tube isultimately secured to the skid by stitching its lower margin 11 to the upper boards 3 as indicated at 17. The staples 17 may be driven only along the sides defined by boards 3, or if desired, additional boards 19 can be secured on boards 2, -so as to permit stitching along all four sides. It will be understood that this stitching operation can be performed by automatic machinery and therefore is adapted for high rates of production with nominal labor costs.

Each article is built up or assembled on a bottom skid moving along an assembly line, which terminates at a packaging station. As the articles reach the packaging station, a tube is lowered thereover, so that its lower margin encompasses the bottom skid. The skid may be carried on a conveyor which then passes a pair of automatic stitching machines, which insert staples along opposed sides, thereby securing the side walls to the skid.

It might also be observed that it is customary to provide a space between the sides of the contained article and the side walls 9 of the container, such space being necessary in order to afford protection to the contents of the box. In other words, a slight puncture or blow directed against one of the side walls of the container should be absorbed by the container before it can reach the side walls of the article. The container also has other purposes, one of which is permitting the packages to be stacked upon one another.

In dealing with such large bulky items as washing machines and other major household appliances, the warehousing and transportation thereof is a considerable problem because of their bulk. Consequently, it is customary to stack the packages, perhaps to a height of twenty feet. Such stacking `is Vnot desirable if the container is formed solely of paperboard, because the board may weaken under excessive humidity to a point where the vertical stacking strength is substantially weakened. In that event, an entire stack of packages might collapse with damage to their contents. For this reason, it is customary to provide wood reinforcing members, which impart stacking strength to the packages. Preferably, these cleats are inserted within the corners of the package so thatthe bottom skid of a superimposed container is supported on the cleats.

' As explained previously, there is a considerable problem in manufacturing and attaching these cleats, and the present invention contemplates an arrangement whereby the cleats arersupplied separately from the side-forming or body section of the container. Moreover, the cleats are incorporated within a paperboard corner member, which serves also as a cushioning device. Such a corner member comprises an elongate angle section adapted to extend substantially the full height of the container. For example, an elongate blank of corrugated board may be folded at 21 to have side webs 23 and 2S extending at right angles to one another. A wood cleat 27 is laid Within the fold, the cleat having any suitable cross section; although a. square section is thought best. Cushioning elements 31 are then secured to the inner surfaces of the side webs 23 and 25 and to the cleat, as by gluing or stitching. These pads may be blocks built up by laminated sections of corrugated board or they may take other forms.

In the embodiment illustrated in Figs. l-5, blocks 31 are glued to the side webs 23 and 25. The exposed faces of the blocks 31 are then covered with a waxed piece of board 35, the wax being desirable in order to prevent the board from scratching the nish of the article. The cover piece 35 also is die-cut and scored to have end walls 37 and flanges 39, the latter being stitched to the corner member. As such, the cushioning pads are firmly secured against inadvertent detachment. Preferably, at least two such cushioning devices are secured on the angle member in longitudinal spaced relationship from one another, but the location thereof will depend upon the character of the article being packaged. For example', the cushioning devices should bear upon portions of the article which are relatively strong and adapted to withstand stresses.

It will be understood that the pads can be built up quite easily in any size or shape by laminating together large blanks of corrugated board, which assembly isv then cut into individual blocks. In some instances, the pads would be of equal thickness, in which event, the block assembly could be partially slotted while otherwise remaining integrally connected at one face, as indicated in Fig. 5. In other instances, it will be necessary for one pad to be somewhat thicker than the other pad. In any event, the pads should be at least as thick as the posts 27, although the latter might be beveled at their inner corners. Certain standards are recognized in the industry as to the extent of special padding required, one to one and one-half inches being a value usually assigned.

A corner member is readily built up with a jig. In

other words, a flat scored section is laid upon a jig, a cleat is laid on the fiat angle section and pressed down so as to fold the section to a right angle shape and the cushioning pads are then glued to the cleat and board so that the cleat is held in proper position. It is contemplated that these structures will be manufactured by the box company and shipped separate from the body sections described previously. Y A supply of corner members is maintained at the packaging point, and four such units are tted to the corners of the article to be packaged as an initial part of the packaging operation. Although it might sometimes be possible to insert the corner members after the tube is lowered over the article, this practice is not always possible because of the particular shape of the article. Accordingly, the preferred practice is to place the corner members against the corners of the article, the tube then being guided down over the article while the elongate angle sections facilitate the telescoping action of the tube. Understandably, the cleats extend the full height of the container and rest on the bottom skid. The package is completed by stitching the tube to the bottom skid and folding over the top-closure iiaps 15.

In order to avoid punching of the top by the corner cleats, a cleated panel 45 is inserted within the top. This panel 45 has a pair of cleats 47 extending along two margins so as to rest upon the corner cleats 27. The other two margins have flanges 49 which interlit with the side walls and corner members.

From the foregoing description, it is apparent that those skilled in the art will understand the structure, function and mode of operation of the invention herein disclosed, and appreciate the advantages thereof. Although one embodiment has been disclosed in detail, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited thereto, but the drawings and description thereof are to be understood as being merely illustrative. For example, the cushioning pads may be of other types. Figs. 8 and 9 illustrate a pad formed from a die-cut and scored blank.v

In making a cushioning pad, the blank is folded to provide an open-work structure formed with a cleat-holding corner pocket 101 and cushioning surfaces 103 and 105 spaced to bear against the corner of the contained article. It is realized that many modifications and variations will present themselves to those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit of this invention or the scope thereof as set forth in the appended claims.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

l. ln a packing case of the character set forth, having a tube of generally rectangular cross section for forming the side walls of the container, the improvement that comprises discrete corner members tted within the corners of said tube, each of said corner members being constituted by a paperboard angled section having a telescoping cooperation with the tube and extending substantially the length thereof, a wood reinforcing cleat secured Within the inner corner of said angled section and extending the full height of the container, and cushioning means secured to the inner surfaces of said angled section on opposite sides of said cleat, said cushioning means projecting inwardly from the angled section a distance -greater than the inward projection of said cleat, thereby to hold the contents of the container in spaced relationship from the cleat, and said cleat being held in position by said cushioning members.

2. A. packing case as set forth in claim 1, wherein said cushioning means comprises a die cut scored blank, which is folded to have outer Walls of .right angular relationship and inner walls of right angular relationship held in spaced relationship from said outer walls, said cushioning element further having portions thereof defining a cleat-holding pocket between the inner and outer walls at the corners thereof.

3. In a packing case of the character set forth, having 6 a tube of generally rectangular cross section for forming the side walls of the container, the improvement that comprises discrete corner members fitted within the corners of said tube, each of said corner members being constituted by a paperboard angled section having a telescoping cooperation with the tube and extending substantially the length thereof, a wood reinforcing cleat secured within the inner corner of said angled section and extending the full height of the container, and cushioning means secured to the inner surfaces of said angled section on opposite sides of said cleat, said cushioning means projecting inwardly from the angled section a distance greater than the inward projection of said cleat, thereby to hold the contents of the container in spaced relationship from the cleat, and said cleat being held in position by said cushioning members, said cushioning means comprising blocks of corrugated paperboard secured to the angled sections by means of cover members having an inner face and end Walls extending from said inner face across the ends of the blocks and flanges extending from said end walls in overlying relationship with said angled sections, said flanges being secured to said angled section.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,792,626 Bowersock Feb. 17, 1931 2,013,346 Gomes Sept. 3, 1935 2,240,256 Elmendorf Apr. 29, 1941 2,319,641 Speir May 18, 1943 2,346,003 Bishop Apr. 4, 1944 2,488,692 Talbot Nov. 22, 1949 2,737,136 Ryder Mar. 6, 1956 2,780,572 Carlson Feb. 5, 1957 FOREIGN PATENTS 799,967 France June 24, 1936

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1792626 *Oct 20, 1928Feb 17, 1931Rochester Folding Box CompanyPacking case
US2013346 *Jan 11, 1934Sep 3, 1935Gomes Earl SShipping container
US2240256 *Dec 5, 1938Apr 29, 1941Armin ElmendorfBox and corner construction therefor
US2319641 *Apr 29, 1941May 18, 1943Reynolds Metals CoCarton
US2346003 *Jul 2, 1942Apr 4, 1944Container CorpCollapsible carton
US2488692 *Mar 29, 1947Nov 22, 1949Talbot Frank MPacking case
US2737136 *May 3, 1951Mar 6, 1956Donald F RyderProcess of making a protective gun case
US2780572 *Mar 3, 1953Feb 5, 1957Carlson Arthur EMethod of making reinforced sheet material
FR799967A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3322321 *Apr 12, 1965May 30, 1967Int Paper CoContainer
US5115917 *Jul 8, 1991May 26, 1992Schrage David ACorner support assembly
US8375534 *Feb 19, 2013Batesville Services, Inc.Cremation container
US20120060334 *Sep 6, 2011Mar 15, 2012Batesville Services, Inc.Cremation container
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/521, 229/199, 229/199.1, 206/320
International ClassificationB65D85/64, B65D85/68
Cooperative ClassificationB65D85/64, B65D2585/6815, B65D2585/6855
European ClassificationB65D85/64