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Publication numberUS2920831 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 12, 1960
Filing dateFeb 28, 1957
Priority dateFeb 28, 1957
Publication numberUS 2920831 A, US 2920831A, US-A-2920831, US2920831 A, US2920831A
InventorsJohnsyn Jr Wadsworth J
Original AssigneeJohnsyn Jr Wadsworth J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fuel atomizing nozzle
US 2920831 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 12, 1960 w. J. JOHNSYN, JR

FUEL ATOMIZING NOZZLE Filed Feb. 28. 1957 vhaving improved features of construction.

United States, Patent FUEL A'roMIzlNG NozzLE j Wadsworth J. Jpimsyn, Jr., Milton, Mass. Application February 28, 1957, Serial No. 643,177 i 2 claims. (ci. 239-464) I 'jlhisinvention relates toA combustonequipment, and,l moreparticularly to an improved `form of fuel nozzle for oil burners and the like. v 1

A This is ya continuation in part of my copending application ASerial No.r 425,843, filed April 27, 1954. Application Serial-No. 425,843y was a continuation in part o'f 'eppendipg application serialNo. 346,101, sled April 1, 1953, now abandoned. Application Serial No. 346,101 was a continuation in part of copending application Serial No. 239,735, filed August l, 1951, now abandoned.

An object of the invention is to provide fuel nozzles Further objects are to provide nozzles which Will atomize oil efficiently at a r-ange of capacities, an-d which are adaptableIfor use with high pressure units or with those operating :at lower oil pressures. Other'. objects are't'o provide nozzles of advantageous character which will preclude drip of'oil when the burners are notin operation, and additional objects are to provide nozzles 'which are non-clogging or self-cleaning in character.

Other objects of the invention will Abe apparent to those skilled in the art from the disclosures herein made.

In the accompanying drawings, illustrating specific embodiments of the invention:

Fig. 1 is a longitudinal section of a nozzle construction of this invention;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary longitudinal section ofthe outlet end of the nozzle shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a transverse section taken on line 3-3 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged end view of the stem of the nozzle shown in Fig. 1; and

Fig. 5 is an enlarged end view ofthe forward portion of the feed sleeve and stem of the nozzle shown in Fig. 1 with the nozzle sleeve in section, and showing the tangential oil feed grooves extending inwardly in clockwise direction. A

In Figs. l-5 inclusive is illustrated a form of nozzle construction which advantageously may be used over a wide range of fuel capacity, and with high pressures.

Referring to Figs. 1-5, nozzle 300 is shown as contained within housing members 302 and 304, member 304 being threaded into member 302. Housing member 302 in turn is threaded onto fuel supply pipe 22d. There is lno fuel return tube.

`Stem 306 is generally cylindrical and solid in character, and at its rearward end has flange 308 which seats on shoulder 310 of housing member 302. Ring 312 seats on shoulder 314 of flange 308 and extends forwardly into contact with shoulder 31-6 of housing member 304. Furthermore, forward extension 313 of yring 312 seats on inner surface 315 of 'housing member 304. Stem 306 and ring 312 are held in axial aligned position by axial pressure between housing members 302 and 304. Forwardly of ,flange 308 is the smaller cylindrical portion 318. A plurality of symmetrically disposed oil passage holes extend through flange 308 at 320 and through flange 308 and cylindrical portion 318 at 322. The forward end v annular passage 338 defined between ring 334 and re-4 y ice of stem 306 is shown as frustoconical in. shape with conical surface 324 and central surface 326 (Fig. 4). Conical surface 324 is provided with non-radial tangential grooves 328. At its forward portion, stem 306 is reduced in diameter at 330 and 332, and ring 334 is disposed on reduced section 330 vwith force fit. Ring 334 extends forwardly sothat its leading edge is in alignment with and forms a spaced extension of conical surface 324. Ring 334 is provided with `symmetrically disposed radial oil passage holes 336 which lead into the duced section 332. v

Nozzle sleeve 340 fits over stem 306 and is arranged to move longitudinally with respect to the latter with` sliding t. Nozzle sleeve 340 is shown as formed of outer cylindrical member 340a and inner cylindrical` member 340b, the two portions 340e and 340b beingv f 346 which extend forwardly to the conical inner forward surface 348 of outer nozzle sleeve member 340m Orifice 350 is formed in outer sleeve umember 340g.

f At the rearward end of outer nozzle sleeve member 340a is retaining flange 352 for oil-sealing gasket 354,

`conveniently composed of neoprene. Forwardly of flange 352 is the larger flange 355, the forward movement of which, and of the nozzle sleeve 340, is Vlimited by shoulder 356 of ring 312.

At the forward end of the nozzle, end portion 358 is threaded into housing member 304. End portion 358 is centrally apertured to receive nozzle sleeve 340 with clearance fit, and is longitudinally adjustable by means of Spanner Wrench grooves 360.

Compression spring 362 is disposed in the annular space between nozzle sleeve 340 and housing members 302 and 304, and bears endwise on the forward surface of flange 355 and the rearward shoulder 364 of end portion 358. The compression of the spring may be adjusted by longitudinal adjustment of end portion 358.

In operation, the fuel oil enters from supply pipe 22d, and some oil passes through apertures 320 into pressure chamber 366 and the remainder of the oil passes through feed holes 322 into annular space 368, through longitudinal grooves 342 into annular space 344, and thence into tangential grooves 346.

At oil pressures insuficient to overcome the resistance of spring 362, the oil will pass from tangential grooves 346 through apertures 336, into annular groove 332, through tangential grooves 328, into whirl chamber 370. The oil whirls tangentially in whirl chamber 370 and sprays out of orifice 350 in the form of a cone.

At oil pressures sufficient to overcome the resistance of spring 362 and thus to move the nozzle sleeve forwardly, some of the oil will move as described in the next preceding paragraph, but most of the oil will move directly from tangential grooves 346 into the enlarged whirl chamber 370 formed by the forward movement off nozzle sleeve 340, and thence the oil will move tangentially in the enlarged whirl chamber 370 and outwardly of orifice 350 in the form of a cone.

The nozzle construction shown in Figs. 1-5 provides a smooth ow of oil without turbulence at any capacity. The capacity of the nozzle illustrated in Figs. 1-5 is controlled solely by the pressure of the oil supplied from feed pipe 22d.

"'1`l'1'e` nozzles may be 'adapted' to operate under various conditions by the use'of compression springs of predetermined selected characteristics.

It will be understood that various changes and modifications maybe'fmade inthe nozzle herein disclosed, while still coming within the scope of the invention.

Having disclosed my invention, what I claim as new anddesire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. In a fuel nozzle, in combination, va longitudinally extending stem, a nozzle sleeve 'movable longitudinally o'f said-stem, spring means 'resisting forward movement of said sleeve, the forward interior surface of said nozzle sleeve being cone-shaped and provided with anoriice at Vthe apex of said cone, the forward end of said stem being frusto-conical in shape and arranged to seat on the-adjacent surface of said nozzle sleeve to define a cone-shaped whirl chamber, the inclined surface of the forward end of said stem being provided with tangential grooves of small capacity, va 'second set of tangential grooves 'of larger capacity formed in `said nozzle sleeve and communicating with said smaller tangential grooves, said larger tangential grooves communicating directly with-said whirl chamber when said nozzle sleeve is moved forwardly and the whirl chamber correspondingly enlarged, and oil supply passages formed in said parts to permit oil to pass from 'the rearward portion of said stemto said larger tangential grooves.

2. In a fuel nozzle, in combination, a longitudinally extending stern, a nozzle sleeve movable longitudinally of said stem, spring means resisting forward 'movement of said sleeve, the forward interior surface of said nozzle sleeve `being cone-shaped and provided with an orifice at the lapex of said cone, the forward end of said stem being `frusto-conical in shape and arranged to seat on the adjacent surface of said nozzle sleeve to define a cone-shaped whirl chamber, the inclined surfaceof the forward end of said stern being provided with tangential grooves of small capacity, "a second set of tangential grooves of larger capacity formed in said nozzle sleeve and communicating with said smaller tangential grooves, said larger tangential grooves communicating directly with said whirl chamber when said nozzle sleeve is moved forwardly and the whirl chamber correspondingly enlarged, oil supply passages formed in said parts to permit oil to pass from the rearward portion of said stem to said larger tangential grooves, a rst flange extending outwardly from the rearward portion of said stern, a concentric annular ring extending forwardly from said flange, a second flange extending from said nozzle sleeve outwardly to said ring with sliding t, a third ange, rearwardly of said second ange, extending outwardly from vsaid nozzle sleeve Itoward said ring but stopping short thereof, a resilient annular siding member within said ring directly adjacent to the inner surface of said ring and the rearward outer portion of said second flange, means in said nozzle to hold said ring and first an'ge in assembled relation, and oil supply passages from the rearward portion of said stem to the chamber defined by said ring, anges and adjacent parts.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,326,488 Fisher Dec. 20, 1919 1,644,372 Gray Oct. 4, 1927 `2,079,430 `Bargeboer May 4, 1937 2,092,519 McLean Sept. 7, 1937 2,345,402 Lubbock Mar. 28, 1944 2,595,566 carey May 6, 1952 2,660,474 Lee May 24, 1953

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1326488 *Dec 2, 1918Dec 30, 1919Joseph O FisherFuel-oil burner for boilers.
US1644372 *Apr 21, 1922Oct 4, 1927James H GrayBurner for liquid fuel
US2079430 *Jul 13, 1934May 4, 1937Bargeboer AdolfOil burner device
US2092519 *Oct 1, 1935Sep 7, 1937Mclean William AVaporizing device
US2345402 *Sep 30, 1940Mar 28, 1944Anglo Saxon Petroleum CompanyLiquid-fuel burner
US2595566 *Oct 31, 1949May 6, 1952Dowty Equipment LtdUniversal pipe connection for spill burners
US2660474 *Aug 30, 1950Nov 24, 1953Ii Leighton LeeNozzle
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4945877 *Mar 1, 1989Aug 7, 1990Robert Bosch GmbhFuel injection valve
US5108037 *Mar 9, 1990Apr 28, 1992Hitachi Ltd.Fuel injection valve
US5722598 *May 20, 1994Mar 3, 1998Werding; WinfriedSpraying nozzle for regulating the rate of flow per unit of time
US6089473 *Aug 30, 1997Jul 18, 2000Robert Bosch GmbhValve, in particular a fuel injection valve
US6764033 *Aug 21, 2001Jul 20, 2004Robert Bosch GmbhSwirl plate and fuel injection valve comprising such a swirl plate
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/464, 239/466, 239/488, 239/533.2
International ClassificationF23D11/38, F23D11/36
Cooperative ClassificationF23D11/383
European ClassificationF23D11/38B