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Publication numberUS2921577 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 19, 1960
Filing dateMar 29, 1956
Priority dateMar 29, 1956
Publication numberUS 2921577 A, US 2921577A, US-A-2921577, US2921577 A, US2921577A
InventorsSmith Edmund D
Original AssigneeSmith Edmund D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Simplified reflector oven
US 2921577 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 19, 1960 E. D. SMITH SIMPLIFIED REFLECTOR OVEN Fild March 29, 1956 INVENTOR 5 EDMUND 0. SM! TH ATTORNEY United States Patent SIMPLIFIED REFLECTOR OVEN Edmund D. Smith, Joplin, Mo.

Application March 29, 1956, Serial No. 574,896

2 Claims. (Cl. 126-274) The present invention relates to reflector ovens and more particularly to an improved and greatly simplified reflector oven of the type particularly useful to woodsmen, hunters, campers, boy scouts, etc. for cooking around an open camp fire.

I am aware that reflector ovens of various'constructions and designs have been proposed heretofore. However, none of the reflector ovens of the prior art have been entirely satisfactory for the purpose intended and under normal conditions of use, i.e., while camped in the field. For example, the reflector ovens of the prior art are ineflicient, complicated, bulky items requiring numerous elements which may get out of order or be misplaced such as rods, bolts, screws, turnbuttons, hooks and wires. Such ovens are not only diflicult to manufacture and thus unnecessarily expensive, but generally have one or more elements which must be removed and separately stored each time the oven is disassembled. Often the separable elements are lost while on a camping trip, or between trips thereby rendering the oven useless at a time when it is needed. Those familiar with reflector ovens have long recognized these and other disadvantages and deficiencies of the prior art, but no one heretofore has offered an adequate solution to the problems involved.

The present invention provides a novel, ingenious and greatly simplified construction for a reflector oven which not only overcomes the disadvantages and deficiencies of the prior art, but which also provides many novel features and advantages not heretofore possible in many respects or even contemplated. The reflector oven in accordance with the present invention consists of a structure made up of flat sheets of metal which are hinged together. Certain of the metal sheets are formed with tongues and slots suitably arranged to provide a stable structure when the oven is assembled, and which will allow folding of the metal sheets to form a flat compact kit for purposes of storage and transportation. The many novel features and advantages provided by such a structure will be further evident from the description hereinafter.

it is an object of the present invention to provide a novel and greatly simplified reflector oven.

structed in accordance with the present invention and shown assembled and ready for baking or broiling; and

Fig. 2 further illustrates the reflector oven of Fig. 1, which is shown knocked-down and ready for folding into a compact kit convenient for storage and transportation or for setting up, as the case may be; and

Fig. 3 is a side view of the assembled and set up reflector oven of Fig. 1, but with the hinged top reflector sheet tilted back to an optimum angle for more efficient baking or broiling and to provide additional space above the baking shelf for larger portions of food.

Referring now to the drawing and more particularly to Figs. 1 and 2, the principal elements of a presently preferred embodiment of the simplified reflector oven 1 constructed in accordance with the present invention comprise a flat generally rectangular baking or broiling shelf 2, a flat rectangular bottom reflector sheet 3, a flat rectangular top reflector sheet 4, and a pair of identical flat generally triangular side wall stabilizing sheets 5. While the various foregoing elements will be described herein and illustrated in the drawing as having certain specific configurations, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that such specific configurations may be modified without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention.

The baking shelf 2 is disposed between the bottom reflector sheet 3 and top reflector sheet 4. These three elements are hinged together near one edge of each, which will be referred to as the rear edge, by a plurality of rings 6 inserted through suitably spaced openings 7, thus allowing swinging movement when desired around the axis defined by rings 6. A pair of triangular sidewall stabilizing sheets 5 are disposed along the side edges of bottom reflector sheet 3 and hinged thereto near their respective edges by a plurality of rings 8 inserted through suitably spaced openings 9, thus allowing swinging movement of each when desired around the axis defined by rings 8.

The bottom and top reflector sheets 3 and 4 may be of substantially the same width. The baking shelf 2 may also be of this same width, but in such event the shelf is too wide to be enclosed entirely within the assembled oven and thus will extend outwardly and slightly past the triangular stabilizing sheets 5. The assembled oven may be given an improved appearance by constructing the baking shelf 2 of a width slightly less than that of reflector sheets 3 and 4 just suflicient to extend up to the outer edge of triangular stabilizing sheets 5, as shown in Fig. 1.

The bottom reflector sheet 3 and baking shelf 2 are of substantially the same length, but top reflector sheet 4 is somewhat longer and extends past the ends of bottom reflector sheet 3 and baking shelf 2 a sufficient distance I to provide space for a pair of transverse slots 10. The

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a reflector oven consisting of a plurality of flat metallic sheets hinged together in a specific manner and formed with a plurality of suitably arranged tongues and slots for the purpose of providing a stable structure when the oven is assembled for use.

It is still a further object of the present invention to provide a reflector oven, the parts of which can be easily and cheaply manufactured so that the oven can be sold in kit form, at a low price, to be assembled by the purchaser.

Still other objects of the present invention and the attendant advantages thereof will be apparent to those skilled in the art by reference to the following detailed description and the drawing, in which:

' Fig. l is a perspective view of a reflector oven con slots 10 are so cut and spaced as to receive tongues 11 on triangular stabilizing sheets 5 when triangular stabilizing sheets 5 are at substantially a 90 angle with bottom reflector sheet 3. The triangular stabilizing sheets 5 are also provided with suitably cut and spaced slots 12 to receive tongues 14 on baking shelf 2. The tongues 11 and 14 are each provided with any convenient means for holding the elements of the set up oven in place, e.g., openings '15 to receive amatch stick, small twig, or similar object 17. Such means may be omitted if desired.

Referring now to Fig. l, the reflector oven is shown assembled and ready for use with the rear end resting on a log, stone or other similar object 16 for the purpose of maintaining the baking shelf 2 substantially level. The reflector sheets 3 and 4 are each positioned at an angle to baking shelf 2 and with the forward edges of the baking shelf 2, reflector sheets 3 and 4', and triangular stabilizing sheets 5 all being substantially in the same vertical plane. By referring back to Fig. 2, it will as 3 evident that in Fig. 1 the baking shelf-2 has been folded downwardly and to the left from the Fig. 2 position, thus allowing the tongues 14 to be inserted into slots 12 of the triangular stabilizing sheets on movement of the latter upwardly into a position at a 90 angle to the bottom refiector sheet 3. Top reflector sheet 4 is then folded upwardly to rest on triangular stabilizing sheets 5 and with the tongues 11 inserted into slots 10. A match stick 17 may then be inserted into each of the openings 15 to keep the various elements in place.

Referring now to Fig. 3, the oven illustrated in Fig. 1 is shown with the match sticks 17 removed from openings 15 in tongues 11 and with top reflector sheet 4 tilted backwardly somewhat by means of a small stick 18 inserted between triangular stabilizing sheet 5 and top reflector sheet 4. This arrangement permits the top reflector sheet 4 to be adjusted from time to time to the optimum angle for more efliecient and better baking as well as providing additional space above baking shelf 2 when it is desired to cook larger portions of food. It will be recognized by those familiar with reflector ovens that this arrangement also has the important advantage of permitting control of the baking temperature to an appreciable extent and thus frequent adjustments requiring movement of the oven nearer or farther from the fire are not necessary. In this use of the oven the important advantage is the rigidity of the main part of the device, despite the adjustability of the top reflector sheet 4. The tongues and slots remaining in interlocking position hold the oven as a whole in unitary and operative relation. Of course, if this feature is dispensed with, each stabilizing sheet 5 could be hinged to a different reflector sheet.

The reflector oven described herein is extremely simple to assemble and place in operation. All that is necessary is that the oven be removed from its kit, laid on the ground and opened to the position shown in Fig. 2. The baking shelf 2 is folded downwardly to a position allowing tongues 14 to be inserted in slots 12, the triangular stabilizing sheets 5 folded upwardly and tongues 14 inserted into slots 12, the top reflector sheet 4 folded over on triangular stabilizing sheets 5 and tongues 11 inserted into slots 10. Then, if desired, match sticks 17 are inserted into openings 15. The oven is now ready to be placed a suitable distance from the camp fire and once a suitable location is determined, a log 16 is placed under the rear of the oven. Portions of food are then placed directly on the baking shelf 2 since a pan is not needed. Heat rays radiating from the camp fire and reflected by both the bottom and top reflector sheets 3 and 4 onto the baking shelf 2, as well as radiation directly from the camp fire, cook the food efiiciently and in a minimum period of time.

On account of its simple form the oven of the present invention lends itself admirably to sale in the popular kit form. Each kit would consist of the five sheet metal parts and six open rings or other hinge elements. The purchaser would assemble the rings and sheets, closing the rings, and the oven would be ready for use.

The oven is preferably constructed of sheet aluminum or tin plate and thus it is stable and light weight. The construction is such that bolts, screws, wires, tum-buttons or other similar devices are entirely eliminated and thus there are no pieces to be packed separately with the possibility of their being misplaced. Since the assembled oven is stable and cannot be shaken apart, it is easily moved nearer or farther from the camp fire by grasping at any convenient location, or by pushing or pulling with a stake. When the reflector oven is constructed of relatively thin metal sheet, it may be quickly and easily folded into a compact kit having a thickness of about 14 inch to inch, and usually weighing no more than 1 to 2 pounds for the average size oven. It is readily apparent that the many advantageous features provided in a reflector oven of such construction and design are extremely desirable under the particular conditions to which such a device is subjected while in use. Instead of openings 15 for match sticks, the tongues may utilize any other suitable locking means so long as they are readily and cheaply formed in the sheet metal of the tongues or sheets.

While the present invention has been described and illustrated herein with particular reference to a presently preferred specific embodiment, it is understood that the invention is not limited thereto and that the invention may be practiced within the scope of the appended claims other than as specifically described.

What is claimed is:

1. A reflector oven comprising first and second reflector sheets and a baking shelf, the first and second reflector sheets being of substantially the same width and the baking shelf having a width not greater than that of the reflector sheets, each of the reflector sheets and the baking shelf having a rear edge and side edges, hinge means for pivotally connecting the reflector sheets and the baking shelf together near their respective rear edges to allow relative swinging movement around the hinge axis, the baking shelf being between the first and second reflector sheets, a pair of upright triangular stabilizing sheets, each side edge of the first reflector sheet having one of the stabliizing sheets adjacent thereto, second hinge means for connecting each stabilizing sheet near the edge of a first side thereof to a side edge portion of the first reflector sheet to allow swinging movement around the hinge axis, at least one portion of the second hinge means for each stabilizing sheet being remote from the rear edge of the first reflector sheet, each of the stabilizing sheets extending upward from its hinged connection to the first reflector sheet with the baking shelf being between the stabilizing sheets, a tongue extending past each of the side edges of the baking shelf at a point remote from the rear edge thereof, the tongues being integral extensions of the baking shelf and in substantially the same plane as the baking shelf, a slot in each of the stabilizing sheets, the slots in the stabilizing sheets. receiving the tongues on the baking shelf, second tongue means extending past a second side of each of the stabilizing sheets at a point remote from the rear edge of the second reflector sheet, the second tongue means being integral extensions of the stabilizing sheets and in substantially the same plane as the stabilizing sheet, a pair of slots in the second reflector sheet for receiving the second tongue means on the stabilizing sheets, and fastening means located near the upper surface of the second reflector sheet for retaining the second tongue means on the stabilizing sheets in the slots in the second reflector sheet.

2. A reflector oven comprising first and second flat reflector sheets and a fiat baking shelf, the first and second reflector sheets being of substantially the same width and the baking shelf having a width not greater than that of the reflector sheets, each of the reflector sheets and'the baking shelf having a rear edge and side edges, hinge means for pivotally connecting the reflector sheets and the baking shelf together near their respective rear edges to allow relative swinging movement around the hinge axis, the baking shelf being between the first and second reflector sheets, a pair of flat upright triangular stabilizing sheets, each side edge of the first reflector sheet having one of the stabilizing sheets adjacent thereto, second hinge means for connecting each stabilizing sheet near the edge of a first side thereof to a side edge portion of the first reflector sheet to allow swinging movement around the hinge axis, at least one portion of the second hinge means for each stabilizing sheet being remote from the rear edge of the first reflector sheet, each of the stabilizing sheets extending upward from its hinged connection to the first reflector sheet with the baking shelf being between the stabilizing sheets, a tongue extending past each of the side edges of the baking shelf at a point remote from the rear edge thereof, the tongues being integral extensions of the baking shelf and in substantially the same plane as the baking shelf, a slot in each of the stabilizing sheets, the slots in the stabilizing sheets receiving the tongues on the baking shelf, second tongue means extending past a second sideof each of the stabilizing sheets at a point remote from the rear edge of the second reflector sheet, the second tongue means including integral extensions of the stabilizing sheets which are in substantially the same plane as the stabilizing sheet, a pair of slots in the second reflector sheet for receiving at least a portion of the second tongue means on the stabilizing sheets, and fastening means located near the upper surface of the second reflector sheet for retaining at least a portion of the second tongue means on the stabilizing sheets in the slots in the second reflector sheet.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US34468 *Feb 18, 1862Himself And MImprovement in camp-stoves
US132167 *Oct 15, 1872 Improvement in broilers
US216003 *Mar 29, 1879May 27, 1879 Improvement in domestic ovens
US240639 *Feb 18, 1881Apr 26, 1881 William a
US449432 *Jun 7, 1890Mar 31, 1891 Domestic oven
US2469885 *Jan 20, 1945May 10, 1949Molla Charles PCollapsible firebox
US2543115 *Dec 4, 1947Feb 27, 1951Lindstaedt Frank FReflector oven
US2580925 *May 28, 1947Jan 1, 1952Jarvis Kenneth WReflector oven
US2757664 *Jul 7, 1953Aug 7, 1956Mcdowell Lonzo AReflector oven
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2969055 *Oct 10, 1958Jan 24, 1961Rolland A MartinReflector camp ovens
US3026866 *Apr 24, 1961Mar 27, 1962Edmund LynchCollapsible reflector oven
US4535753 *Apr 12, 1984Aug 20, 1985Leo ZayauskasRadiant heat collector
US5983887 *Apr 9, 1999Nov 16, 1999Bourgeois; Edward T.Reflector oven
Classifications
U.S. Classification126/274, 126/304.00R, 126/9.00B
International ClassificationF24B1/00, A47J37/07, F24B1/20
Cooperative ClassificationF24B1/205, A47J37/0763
European ClassificationA47J37/07H, F24B1/20B2